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A Passage to India - Pankaj Mishra, Oliver Stallybrass, E.M. Forster
A Passage to India
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3.40 545
Exploring issues of colonialism, faith and the limits of comprehension, E.M. Forster's "A Passage to India" is edited by Oliver Stallybrass, with an introduction by Pankaj Mishra. When Adela Quested and her elderly companion Mrs Moore arrive in the Indian town of Chandrapore, they quickly feel... show more
Exploring issues of colonialism, faith and the limits of comprehension, E.M. Forster's "A Passage to India" is edited by Oliver Stallybrass, with an introduction by Pankaj Mishra. When Adela Quested and her elderly companion Mrs Moore arrive in the Indian town of Chandrapore, they quickly feel trapped by its insular and prejudiced 'Anglo-Indian' community. Determined to escape the parochial English enclave and explore the 'real India', they seek the guidance of the charming and mercurial Dr Aziz, a cultivated Indian Muslim. But a mysterious incident occurs while they are exploring the Marabar caves with Aziz, and the well-respected doctor soon finds himself at the centre of a scandal that rouses violent passions among both the British and their Indian subjects. A masterly portrait of a society in the grip of imperialism, "A Passage to India" compellingly depicts the fate of individuals caught between the great political and cultural conflicts of the modern world. In his introduction, Pankaj Mishra outlines Forster's complex engagement with Indian society and culture. This edition reproduces the Abinger text and notes, and also includes four of Forster's essays on India, a chronology and further reading. E. M. Forster (1879-1970) was a noted English author and critic and a member of the Bloomsbury group. His first novel, "Where Angels Fear To Tread" appeared in 1905. "The Longest Journey" appeared in 1907, followed by "A Room With A View" (1908), based partly on the material from extended holidays in Italy with his mother. "Howards End" (1910) was a story that centred on an English country house and dealt with the clash between two families, one interested in art and literature, the other only in business. Maurice was revised several times during his life, and finally published posthumously in 1971. If you enjoyed "A Passage to India", you might like Rudyard Kipling's "Kim", also available in "Penguin Classics". "His great book...masterly in its presence and its lucidity". (Anita Desai).
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Format: paperback
ISBN: 9780141441160 (014144116X)
Publisher: Penguin
Pages no: 376
Edition language: English
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Community Reviews
Summer Reading Project, BookLikes Satellite
Summer Reading Project, BookLikes Satellite rated it
4.0 A Passage to India, by E.M. Forster
Forster’s 1924 classic, A Passage to India, is a bitingly caustic look at race relations in British India. Anyone with any knowledge of the British Empire will know that the average British attitude towards any indigenous person in the colonies was a blend of condescension, racism, and paternalism. ...
Bloodorange
Bloodorange rated it
0.0 A Passage To India
context - from E. M. Forster's letter - his opinions may seem offensive, and I have yet to see whether and how they surface in the novel, so for the time being, I'll mark it as a "to his closest Indian friend Syed Ross Masood - almost certainly the main model for the character of Aziz in A Passage t...
The better to see you, my dear
The better to see you, my dear rated it
5.0 The unstable bridges
What a beautiful piece about a sad limitation of humanity: the bridging of cultures. It's uncomfortable, poignant, lovely, and human. I don't know how much more I can say, since there is actually little plot to the work itself, the pages being driven by description, be it of places, of people and ...
So.... Nicky?
So.... Nicky? rated it
0.0 A Passage to India
SPOILERSSo well done. I was so deeply invested in all the story people, especially Dr. Aziz, that when he finds himself in great trouble (at end of Part One), I could not continue reading. I even went to Wikipedia to read the synopsis to make sure he survived, but I still couldn't make myself go on ...
Darth Pony
Darth Pony rated it
I really struggled through this one. The star rating is as objective as I can make it under the circumstances. The writing is beautiful, the characters vivid and engaging, and the story is poignant. However, my reading experience was heavily colored by current events (i.e. Ferguson and all the abhor...
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