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Angela Y. Davis
Angela Y. Davis is a political activist, scholar, author, and speaker. She is an outspoken advocate for the oppressed and exploited, writing on Black liberation, prison abolition, the intersections of race, gender, and class, and international solidarity with Palestine. She is the author of... show more



Angela Y. Davis is a political activist, scholar, author, and speaker. She is an outspoken advocate for the oppressed and exploited, writing on Black liberation, prison abolition, the intersections of race, gender, and class, and international solidarity with Palestine. She is the author of several books, including Women, Race, and Class and Are Prisons Obsolete? She is the subject of the acclaimed documentary Free Angela and All Political Prisoners and is Distinguished Professor Emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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Birth date: January 26, 1944
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"So it goes."
"So it goes." rated it 9 months ago
Patrisse Khan-Cullors' life story is not an easy one. Living in Los Angeles with her family, including a brother who we will learn suffers from schizoaffective disorder and a mother who works from sun up to well after dark to keep her children together, sheltered and fed is not easy, but it is what ...
Odd and Bookish
Odd and Bookish rated it 12 months ago
I received this book for free through LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers. This was such a powerful read. Andrea Ritchie did an amazing job making the invisible visible. Women are often left out of the narrative when it comes to police brutality and mass incarceration. I love how inclusive she was of a...
Muccamukk
Muccamukk rated it 1 year ago
I would strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in US history or the history of the protest movement. The story is divided between Shakur's youth and entry into the Black Power movements, and the four years she spent on trail in the early to mid '70s, and both parts are illuminating, thoug...
Obsidian Blue
Obsidian Blue rated it 2 years ago
I really really really wish I had liked this more. Instead I found myself bored throughout the book. If the author, Maryse Conde had actually I think been able to make me feel like she had a good sense of who Tituba was I would have enjoyed this more. Conde decides to have Tituba tell her mother's s...
Odd and Bookish
Odd and Bookish rated it 3 years ago
I read this book for my Women in Politics class. This book's central focus is intersectional feminism. It highlights how gender, race, and class factor into inequality. This book started off incredibly strong, but lost its way a bit in the later chapters. However, still a fantastic and insightful ...
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