Comments: 19
Witty Little Knitter 9 years ago
I haven't actually read any of those (I did once read one where Empress Elisabeth of Austria was secretly a vampire hunter which rode on the same wave but wasn't actually a mashup...that was awesome...I disgress) but I think if there's enough own work from the author I am willing to pay, just like I'm willing to pay for an actuall classic that is annotated/has an introduction about the work etc. basically anything that required the new author to do more than slap on a new cover and offer it on amazon.
Linda Hilton 9 years ago
I have literally hundreds of these, all downloaded from Project Gutenberg or free Kindle versions of same from Amazon. I'm also now obtaining original-language versions (Spanish and French) of some of these classics.
Witty Little Knitter 9 years ago
Dito (things like 'great free stuff' are the resons why I don't throw my e-reader against the wall when it's shows me a black screen and refuses to work for the xth time...) They also have some not-very-well known classics for free I probably would never have heard of otherwise
Linda Hilton 9 years ago
I love being able to get 19th and early 20th century popular fiction, stuff long out of print and not even available at most libraries. Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth, Ann Radcliffe, Marie Corelli, H. Rider Haggard, Wilkie Collins, etc. etc.
Witty Little Knitter 9 years ago
I enjoyed Collin's The Moonstone but haven't gotten round to anything else by him. I'm also really loving R. Freeman's Thorndyke novels ("Sherlock Holmes with real science") and The Scarlet Pimpernell books
Tomes and Tea Leaves 9 years ago
A. I so agree.
Tomes and Tea Leaves 9 years ago
B. Open Library is the best thing ever.
Sock Poppet at Play 9 years ago
I like Open Library, but I have to read it on my computer as they won't let you transfer it to a Kindle and it's really hard reading on my computer. :(
Tomes and Tea Leaves 9 years ago
That's too bad. I put it on my nook (I have a nook and a kindle. I'm hopeless!)
Sock Poppet at Play 9 years ago
How do you transfer Open Library books to your Nook?
Tomes and Tea Leaves 9 years ago
They can be downloaded as epubs, and then you plug in your nook with the usb, and transfer them via Adobe Digital Editions, which is the software many libraries use for transferring ebook loans. When you've got the nook plugged in it shows up on your digital editions dashboard and then it's just a matter of dragging and dropping the files.
Sock Poppet at Play 9 years ago
I never tried transferring a book with the USB. I'll give that a try and see if it works.
Linda Hilton 9 years ago
Can you do that with the regular Digital Editions software? I think I have that on my other computer. Or move it into Calibre?

There is so much stuff I need to learn!!!
Sock Poppet at Play 9 years ago
I've got the book on Adobe Digital Editions and the Kindle plugged in, but the Kindle is not showing on Adobe DE. :(

Maybe it only works on the Nook.
Tomes and Tea Leaves 9 years ago
You have to go through the step of authorizing your computer. I forget exactly how to do it, but it's not hard. It's under the 'file' menu, I think?
Sock Poppet at Play 9 years ago
I don't see any option for authorizing my computer in the File menu on Adobe DE.

I've also tried to change the books in Calibre, but that didn't work, either.
Tomes and Tea Leaves 9 years ago
I just checked, it's under the help menu in Adobe Digital Editions.
Sock Poppet at Play 9 years ago
My computer is already authorized. It looks like Open Library won't transfer to a Kindle. Sad. :(