Comments: 15
Murder by Death 5 years ago
I dislike Orwell's stuff in the strongest possible terms. It's so dark and disturbing that I'd argue his message gets lost by a lot of people who can't get past the awfulness of the story - they want to forget about what they've read asap instead of thinking about any of it. I found Jasper Fforde's Shades of Grey a much more effective exploration of the same themes (although others do disagree with me) because Fforde's humour is much more interesting and palatable than Orwell's clinical terror.
Carpe Librum 5 years ago
That one does look interesting, so, of course, my library doesn't have it on audio. I'm not getting much read besides research if it's not on audio right now, but I've at least added it to my TBR. Thanks!
Carpe Librum 5 years ago
I'm always a little bit reluctant to admit it when I don't like a classic (though it happens with frightening frequency) because most people do love them. I mean, I assume that's why they are classics, but this one just didn't interest me.
Ceridwen 5 years ago
I think some of these classics have to hit you at the right age. I read 1984 at maybe 12 or 13, and it was completely devasting. But I'm sure I would not have that reaction now. Like I read Brave New world recently for the first time, and it was a fascinating historical object, but in no way did it hit me in the feels. Younger me for sure would have LOVED it, but wouldn't have appreciated the historical context part. So.
Carpe Librum 5 years ago
That is very true. It would have been kinder to say that this wasn't the right time for me with this book. ;-)
I totally agree that the age you read particular books is important. I read Brave New World, and 1984 in my teens and they hit me hard, and I still re-read them regularly. On the other hand, I read Catcher in the Rye in my thirties, and wanted to beat young Holden senseless with a cricket bat. Whiny little snot with his #FirstWorldProblems.
Ceridwen 5 years ago
Eh, there's no reason to be kind to classics. They're classics, after all, and incoming freshmen will be subjected to them until there's another dystopia of choice. I would vote for Handmaid's Tale, given the current political climate, but I know many folk find that one boring as well.

I read Catcher at 14 and wanted to punch him in the throat, but I suspect it would resonate more now, weirdly. He's clearly suffering from depression -- I mean, insofar as one can armchair diagnose a fictional character -- which I do as well. Not sure though. Sometimes it's the depression, and sometimes you're just an asshole. And teenagers suck. :)
Tannat 5 years ago
I'm not sure how much I *liked* 1984 as a teenager, but parts of it stuck with me, and I haven't gotten around to rereading it to see what I'd think of it now. I wasn't forced to read it though; I read it by choice. I do think it's a good book to have read, if only to get all of the references to it. I'm not sure how well it would work as an audiobook, however, even with a good narrator.
Carpe Librum 5 years ago
Yeah, it has some thought provoking quotes buried in there amid the tedium.
Midu Reads 5 years ago
Have you read Animal Farm yet? Asking because I liked it much more than 1984.
Carpe Librum 5 years ago
I have not. That was another audiobook that I was considering, but this one made me reconsider it. Maybe after a bit of a break.
Midu Reads 5 years ago
I'll wait to see what you think of that one!
Carpe Librum 5 years ago
I used to feel like there must be something wrong with me when I didn't like a classic, but it has happened so much that I decided that can't be it. ;-)