Comments: 4
Familiar Diversions 4 weeks ago
I wrote a comment earlier, but it must have gotten eaten when the site briefly went down. ::sigh:: I thought this was an interesting mystery, but I agree with you about it being somewhat emotionally detached. I didn't really get into it until the author was finally done setting the stage, because the focus was so much more on the puzzle than on the characters as people.
Ani's Book Abyss 4 weeks ago
As a murder mystery, it was very cleverly put together; and at the risk of being called blasphemous =P, I think it had a better puzzle than 'And Then There Were None.' As a story, though, I found it a bit lacking, and Christie's take on the character's reactions and behaviors as the killings progressed seemed better presented. Still, I'm glad I read this book--it had it's moments and I enjoyed myself.

The introduction by Soji Shimada also mentions a lot of other honkaku mysteries that he regards highly, so if any of them have been translated, I might try to find them.
Familiar Diversions 4 weeks ago
I've read one other and am currently reading another, so if you're interested in info: The one I read a short while ago, The Tokyo Zodiac Murders by Soji Shimada, was excellent. A little too much "two guys sitting around and talking about the facts of the case," but the characters and situation were more interesting than The Decagon House Murders. The one I'm reading right now, The Moai Island Puzzle by Alice Arisugawa, seems to have all of The Decagon House Murder's problems plus a few extra. That said, I haven't gotten to the first (?) murder yet, so it may improve.
Ani's Book Abyss 4 weeks ago
I might check out The Moai Island Puzzle, then. The Tokyo Zodiac Murders was actually one of the first Bingo books I read last month, lol. In fact, it was from Zodiac Murders that I found The Decagon House Murders. A lot of dialogue with the two guys just sitting around and discussing the murders, but I did really like it.

Thanks for the recommendation!