Comments: 9
BrokenTune 4 years ago
This one was a bit odd. It certainly was a book that illustrated how a book can keep a reader at a distance just as some of the characters kept Ono at a distance, too.
Chris Blocker 4 years ago
You're right. I do think Ishiguro is really great at helping the reader feel what the characters are feeling. I just wish I knew the truth of what Ono was saying.
BrokenTune 4 years ago
But in an era of "reconstruction" are we meant to know what really happened? I found this book fascinating because Ishiguro, astute as ever, seemed to throw in trails of bread crumbs and a flurry of birds - so who knows where the trail started and ended. It certainly was a book that asked a lot of questions without asking them openly, which I thought may have added to sense of place and time of the novel.

I did not love it as much as his other books (even The Buried Giant), tho precisely because I wasn't allowed to really get into it.

Love your comparison to his other works, especially your observation that the situation between reader and main character is inverted.
What's next on your Ishiguro journey?
Chris Blocker 4 years ago
No, we're probably not meant to know, but that lack of knowing definitely creates some distance between the reader and the story.

What's next? I'm hitting all the unread works in chronological order. Since I've already read The Remains of the Day some years ago, next up is The Unconsoled.
BrokenTune 4 years ago
The Unconsoled is the one I still have left. I hope to read it this year. It's been sitting on my shelf at home for far too long.
Chris Blocker 4 years ago
The Unconsoled is the only one of the three I haven't read that I do not own. Fortunately, I work at a library, so it's almost like I own it.

My expectations for the remaining three aren't the highest, but I'm hoping I'll be surprised. Since you've read all but The Unconsoled, which has been your favorite so far?
BrokenTune 4 years ago
The best was Remains, without a doubt, closely followed by Orphans - and I know I am in the minority here. Maybe it was the circumstances under which I read the book, but I really loved it.

I also really enjoyed The Buried Giant, which a lot of people were not over the moon with.

The worst ones for me were Nocturnes and Never Let Me Go. Again, a lot of people loved NLMG but I found it absolutely, shrug-inducingly boring. Tho, I remember that I had finished some Atwood right before I started it, which may have something to do with it.
Chris Blocker 4 years ago
Never Let Me Go has been my favorite so far, but it was also the first Ishiguro I read. That certainly may have something to do with it. Remains is a close second.
BrokenTune 4 years ago
Sorry, had to edit my comment above - there was a "not" missing (the part about Giant).

Well, there is always something special about the first book of an author that speaks to a reader.

I may not have been able to connect with NLMG, but I love that others love it. And whatever the book, Ishiguro is one author that people should try. My first book was Remains, and it changed my view at the time of what literature can do.