Comments: 7
YouKneeK 3 years ago
Very interesting! I’ve used many of these phrases without ever guessing they came from Shakespeare. In particular, I’d always associated “off with his head” with “Alice in Wonderland”. I hadn’t realized Shakespeare said it first.

The person who designed this was a bit off the mark with “baited breath”, though! It always makes me laugh when I see somebody spell it that way; it makes the meaning much funnier. It should be “bated breath”. http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/baited-versus-bated
Lillelara 3 years ago
I bought a whole quotation dictionary at the Globe Theater. It´s unbelievable how many known quotes and phrases are from Shakespeare. And I know a lot of them, even though I´m a non-native speaker.

I have never heard the phrase "bated breath" so I wouldn´t have noticed the wong spelling. Maybe the designer prefers this way of spelling too ;).

YouKneeK 3 years ago
In the U.S., it’s fairly common to hear somebody say they were "waiting with bated breath”. Basically it means that you were so anxious or excited about something that you forgot to breathe properly while you were waiting. The expression "don't hold your breath" implies a similar meaning and may be more familiar.

“Baited”, on the other hand, means you tried to attract something using bait. Like cheese on a mouse trap. Totally different meaning! :)
Lillelara 3 years ago
Ha, I never want to meet a person with a "baited breath". Sounds ominous ;).
Murder by Death 3 years ago
YouKneeK - your version is much more appealing than mine - my first thought of "baited breath" was fish: either using a smelly fish or a worm as the bait - so fish breath. bleh.
YouKneeK 3 years ago
LOL, baited breath actually always makes me think of mint because, if something smells bad, it’s not likely to be very good bait. My cat is always attracted toward my face if he gets a whiff of mint on my breath after I’ve brushed my teeth. If that’s not baited breath, I don’t know what is. :)