Comments: 7
Char's Horror Corner 3 years ago
Good luck!
Murder by Death 3 years ago
I've been eyeing this book for ages and had just about talked myself out of it - now you have me curious again. I might try to find it at my library. I can see a day coming when I go vegetarian, although it's still a long way off, but no way can I go vegan. I don't see a moral issue with eating eggs or honey or dairy as long as the animals are ethically raised and bred and allowed their natural habitat and variety.
Person Of Interest 3 years ago
Animal protein tends to get a bad rap when it comes to health outcomes. There's increasing evidence that's due to the shift in agri-business post WWII and large scale food production (grain fed vs. pastured or free-range livestock). I'm not a paleo advocate, but some people don't necessarily do well on vegetarian diets. Ditto for the current gluten-free craze; not necessary unless you're genuinely intolerant, sensitive or have some type of auto-immune condition (maybe). People's diets seem to veer to one extreme or another depending on the latest nutritional hype, but it really comes down to your genes.

Look to your ethnic background and its traditional diet. Take your blood type into consideration (the oldest blood group O supposedly doesn't tolerate grains as well as A, B or AB). What health conditions do you or family members have? These are clues to your genetic make-up and can guide your diet choices. Then eat as unprocessed and naturally as your wallet, time and energy permit. That's pretty much it in a nut shell, unless you want to get hard core and follow a strict diet regiment which can definitely make your life feel a lot longer. :) And of course eat less and get more exercise if weight is an issue. Simple yet oh, so hard.













Murder by Death 3 years ago
For me it's not about giving animal proteins a bad rap - I LOVE meat, but I also love animals and it's becoming increasingly difficult for me to maintain the hypocrisy and ignore the connection between the two. :)

But I do agree with everything you say regarding diet (although I'm an O-type and have no issues with gluten except the tendency to eat too much of it, lol); I've never gone on a diet in my life, but avoid processed foods whenever possible (the Eggos in my freezer notwithstanding). My policy since I've been on my own is to eat nothing that comes out of lab, and I refuse to own a scale. That's as close to a 'diet' as I'll likely ever get. Someday I'll likely give up most meat, if not completely, then at least a strict reduction. But again, that's ethical.
Person Of Interest 3 years ago
I worry about consuming animal protein more for environmental reasons, as well as simply producing enough food for the world's growing population. Plant based diets are more sustainable and feed larger numbers of people, so they definitely have an advantage over meat. And while I respect other people's ethical objections to consuming animals or animal products, I also realize it's not an option for me. I do limit my meat consumption to poultry or occasionally fish or pork, though, and keep my portion sizes small (2-3 oz. twice daily).

I just tossed out my personal credo about diet because the scientific/medical establishment has pushed a one size fits all approach for decades, and we've only just started to tease out the complexity of genetic variability over the last 10-15 years. Wanda mentioned the pernicious blood sugar creep that's classically associated with type II diabetes, and I wanted to inject a cautionary note because there are a lot of 'diet prescriptions' out there addressing this epidemic. :)
Wanda's Book Reviews 3 years ago
I'm mostly going to add things to my diet (more flax, hibiscus tea, more nuts & seeds, more veg) and delete at least some of the meat. I go for more blood tests in about 3 months and we'll see what the effect is.
Person Of Interest 3 years ago
Good luck!

I'm not really over-weight but have put on the post menopausal 5-10 extra pounds which refuse to come off. My cholesterol and triglyceride levels are also good. I realized my slightly elevated fasting glucose didn't fit classic type ll diabetes, so I had my primary refer me to an endocrinologist. After some additional blood tests to check insulin levels and rule out antibodies for type l diabetes, my suspicions were confirmed; low normal insulin levels and no antibodies. There are other forms of diabetes, and I appear to have a benign type within a group classified as MODY (mature onset diabetes of the young). It never hurts to do a little research. :)