Comments: 11
"Publisher's Own Ads." Author's other works = card page; not counted as advertising. Other books in a series by other authors called "series page" and not counted as advertising.
Batgrl: Bookish Hooha 7 years ago
Yay, I was really hoping someone would know this! You can imagine how I kept coming up with non-useful search results when I was using the words "book advertising." TY!
I love the old publishing blurbs in the back.

(Does it make me weird that I've read or had read to me 10 of the books on that list? I read a lot of old-fashioned books in my childhood and adolescence.)
Bettie's Books 7 years ago
I scored ten too. And I love the section at the back where other books by the publisher are featured, especially if a £sd postal order is required to purchase the book.
:O)
Batgrl: Bookish Hooha 7 years ago
I think I've only read 4 of those books, but I remember seeing the others - in fact I'm pretty sure I've at least looked through the pages of some. Like Uncle Remus - I never could get into reading anything in "southern" dialect. This probably has something to do with being related to people who speak that way, but that dialect thing in books always annoys me. I know if I'd seen the Heidi books around after I'd read Heidi I'd definitely have picked them up.

I also had NO idea that Bambi was originally written as a book for adults. Or so wiki says anyhow, for whatever that's worth.
SilverThistle 7 years ago
I haven't read any Mills & Boon in a while, but I think they still do the back advert thing (and the middle tear-out card thing...and the front ad thing...)
Bettie's Books 7 years ago
I'd forgotten about the card in the middle thing - it doubled up as bookmark.
:O)
Batgrl: Bookish Hooha 7 years ago
Oh yes, that middle section - sometimes it was a card plus a few full pages in color filled with book adverts - I only remember them in paperbacks. And they always annoyed me because you couldn't easily remove them without risking tearing something.
Portable Magic 7 years ago
I found Penrod on my grandfather's bookshelves on one of those seemingly endless childhood summer vacations that I spent visiting them. I remember it as a fun read, although much of the early 20th century mores and activities were a mystery to me. Did people really chew tar like chewing gum? But I recall Penrod as a Huckleberry Finn-like character, a boy full of mischief who is always trying to escape his mother's civilizing influence. I found it on Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/402/402-h/402-h.htm
Batgrl: Bookish Hooha 7 years ago
Gutenberg has a lot of Tarkington - it made me think I really should check out some of his work. I have my grandparents to thank for a lot of these old reads too! Well, them and the fact that they never tossed out the old kids books my mother and uncle read - the ones that hadn't fallen apart anyway.

Immediate ew and no way to the chewing tar thing! You'd have to be seriously desperate - I kind of hope no one did. I know my parents have fond memories of chewing sugar cane, but they're also from the southern US where it's easy to grow.
Oh yes, I've read (or had read to me) Penrod, Penrod and Sam, and Seventeen - my grandparents had a lot of Tarkington.