Comments:
Abandoned by user 6 years ago
I'm thinking I'll read this one, too. I have a copy of it on my shelves, and it is super short!
BrokenTune 6 years ago
My edition had some of her other short stories, too. They were also worth reading. I had no idea she was the niece of Harriet Beecher Stowe and was such a prominent campaigner. Her short stories Making a Change (1911) and If I Were A Man (1914) were also pretty interesting. (They're not horror, tho.)
BrokenTune 6 years ago
Sorry, I now added a picture which kinda acts as a page break, so nothing spoilery will show in your feed.
BrokenTune 6 years ago
She wrote a novel????? Thanks Tigus. Am off to find it...
BrokenTune 6 years ago
:D Just found it.
BrokenTune 6 years ago
And there is a LibriVox recording. :D
Kitty Horror 6 years ago
I liked the ending with this one, her behaviour towards her husband was very fitting.
A story where "circumstances that once described the fate of real people will now pass as classic horror" -- that pretty much is precisely what freaks me out about this story. Yes.
BrokenTune 6 years ago
That's exactly what gets me every time, too. There is very little that is as horrifying as finding out that fictional horrors were fact, even more so when it was not a single incident.

I have a just moved on the the other book on the Halloween bingo list that falls into the same category: Shirley Jackson's account of the Salem Witch Trials.
I think I may need to return to Granny after that!
That very much sounds like Granny is sorely going to be called for afterwards, yes. Shirley Jackson on the Salem Witch trials ... *shudder*.
BrokenTune 6 years ago
Interestingly, she keeps it factual. I guess even Jackson realised that she didn't need to add much to the official records to make this chilling.
That's why she's such a great author -- she has a pitch-perfect sense for what will work to best effect. Did you know that most of the "original" readers of "The Lottery" actually thought she was relating facts when the story was first published in the New Yorker?
BrokenTune 6 years ago
I can believe it.
BrokenTune 6 years ago
That is exactly the effect that reading The Yellow Wallpaper had on me.
BrokenTune 6 years ago
Yes, I thought it was one way to show that the is a fundamental difference between a child and the woman, and how treatment is, effectively, aimed at a child but not the adult. Like there was no difference.
BrokenTune 6 years ago
I would love to see this as a play. I would be horrified, but it would be great to have that experience of being in the same room.