Comments: 9
Opinions of Saturn 5 years ago
I dimly recall reading this one back in middle school, definitely on my endless list of re-reads. Ariadne is indeed quite the gem.
BrokenTune 5 years ago
I love Ariadne. She is so much fun.
Mike Finn 5 years ago
I've never read a Poirot book, but if you'd asked me to whom I would attribute that wonderful quote about elephants, it wouldn't have been Agatha Christie. it sounds intriguing.
BrokenTune 5 years ago
You know, some of the Poirot books are really quite different from the popular adaptations and do not pander to the "image" of Poirot. I think this is one of them, Curtain is another (but Curtain should ALWAYS be the last Poirot book you'll ever read). Orient Express was also changed in the adaptations with respect to its outlook, atmosphere and, in some cases, ending.
Mike Finn 5 years ago
Ok. I'm hooked. I'll give it a try.
BrokenTune 5 years ago
Exciting. I'll keep a look out for what you make of Poirot. :)
BrokenTune 5 years ago
I was wondering about the same thing.
Abandoned by user 4 years ago
I thought this one was quite good. Several of her late mysteries seemed to play with the concept of identity and whether or not individuals can ever really be "known" by others. This one does it better than many of the others.
BrokenTune 4 years ago
Yes, it does. Just when I think I got Christie sussed, she adds in a little something else. And the theme of whether someone can ever really be known crops up a few times in her work - Murder in Mesopotamia, where one of the most ridiculous premises hangs on someone not recognising someone, The Moving Finger or A Murder is Announced where Christie takes the idea that everyone knows everyone in a small village and tilts it on its head, etc.