Comments: 5
Treatment methods could be slow to change. A vaccine was developed starting in the 1920s, but it wasn't until the mid-50s that it came into widespread usage (in developed countries like the UK).
Person Of Interest 4 years ago
Isoniazid was introduced in 1952 and is still considered one of the most important drugs in the treatment of TB. What's even more interesting -- I read about this years ago -- is a closely related drug called iproniazid was developed a year later for TB treatment as well, and physicians noticed patients treated with it had a marked improvement in mood. It was subsequently developed into the first MAO inhibitor antidepressant in 1958. Here's a link to the long version of the story:

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/bodyhorrors/2016/01/27/2081/#.WP2qjGY2yM8
BrokenTune 4 years ago
Cool. Thank you both for the background and links.

I had supposed that antibiotics had not been in wide-spread use to treat TB and that maybe the antibiotics that were available may not have been researched for use on this specific infection. It was getting a bit late for Google-fu last night. :)

Isn't it amazing to think of how much the availability of antibiotics and vaccines have changed life over the last 100 years, tho?
I think streptomycin was the first used against TB, and not until the very late 40s/early 50s, I think.
Person Of Interest 4 years ago
Yes, streptomycin is part of the drug protocol. As a kid I tested positive for the tuberculin skin test they screened with in school during the 60's & 70's. Fortunately I never needed treatment. My exposure probably happened through unpasteurized milk, cream and butter which I ate when I visited my grandparents' farm.