Comments: 29
markk 5 months ago
I've been meaning to read up on the history of women's suffrage. Mind if I join you?
BrokenTune 5 months ago
But of course! That'll be kinda cool.
markk 5 months ago
Fantastic! I may have to deviate from a couple of the books you're doing, though, as my German proficiency isn't up to book-reading level.
BrokenTune 5 months ago
Sure. And I'm already looking forward to seeing which books you'll pick up, too.

Btw, the Scottish one might be hard to find, too. I'm sourcing that one from the university library. I hope they have it. They should. The author works at the university.
markk 5 months ago
That one I should be able to get through inter-library loan. I'm thinking of starting with Flexner's "Century of Struggle" and I'll probably use the opportunity to read DuBois's "Feminism and Suffrage," which I've had on my shelf for years. I need to do some research on the historical literature on German suffrage (a topic I never considered reading about until now!), but if I can't find anything accessible I'll probably turn to Adams's "Women & the Vote: A World History."
BrokenTune 5 months ago
They all sound tempting. I'll need to check if any of the libraries here have them.
This will make for nice complementary reading projects with the women writers challenge. I expect I'll be dipping into some suffrage movement texts at some point as well -- I just don't want to limit it to that.
BrokenTune 5 months ago
Yeah, I have been planning this one for quite some time, and of course I have more books that fit the topic, but don't want to limit myself to a specific reading list. So, I'll draw on related books authors as the moods takes me.

As for the writers' challenge, I like the idea but again don't think the format fits my reading nor that the purpose will really benefit my reading, as currently my books read are spread pretty much 50/50 between men and women (yeah, I have a spreadsheet....) - not on purpose, it's just the way it works out. I'd much rather focus on topics than who wrote it.
Well, my reading list for the women authors challenge are all authors (and books) that already were on my TBR anyway, so all I'll be doing is moving them up a bit! :)
BrokenTune 5 months ago
That's a winner, then. :)
I hope so, anyway ...
Tea, Rain, Book 5 months ago
Great minds think alike, as I am looking at 2020 as my year of reading how (certain groups of) women got the vote in the US. 2018 is earmarked for all things WWI as the 100th anniversary of the Armistice is in November.
BrokenTune 5 months ago
Great minds indeed think alike. I am planning on re-reading the Remarque novels next year for the very same reason!
markk 5 months ago
I'm currently working on a podcast with a couple of historians that looks at the interrelationship between the war and the granting of women the vote in the U.S.
Yeah, the war and the vote are intertwined, in the US and Britain, anyway. (In France, women would wait for the aftermath of another war, and I don't know enough about the movement in Germany to make a statement of that nature, one way or the other.)
BrokenTune 4 months ago
It's true for Germany, too.
That was my suspicion, but it's been a while since I did a lot of reading on the international suffrage movement (about 25 years or so), and I the books I had access to did not have much material that I remember on Germany. (At any rate I was concentrating on the American and British movements.)
BrokenTune 4 months ago
It was intertwined but less directly so than one imagines. The change-out of government in November 1918 put up a government that was lead by a party that had long (since 1891) sought constitutional reform, including a reform of the right to vote to include both men and women irrespective of income/tax contribution from the age of 20, and for elections to be held on days that no one was working, i.e. national holidays (German election today are still held on Sundays - and it is only a recent development that shops open on Sundays).
So, it was not the war itself that promoted an equal right to vote but rather the change of government following the surrender.
Makes sense. SDP, yes?
BrokenTune 4 months ago
SPD, yes. :)
Obsession with words 4 months ago
I love projects like this.
BrokenTune 4 months ago
Me, too. Do you have projects lined up 2018?
Obsession with words 4 months ago
I´ll be reading books about Colonial America.
BrokenTune 4 months ago
Ooh! Are there any particular aspects that you're reading for?
Obsession with words 4 months ago
I want to learn more about that time for my Genealogy research. I really want to learn more about the various immigration to America, especially those that were escaping religious persecution. I have learned that some of my ancestors were Quakers. Some of my ancestors were Irish and Scottish. I also am interested in the wars and other interactions with the Indians. Some of my ancestors fought in the Creek War and I am told that I am part Indian on both sides of my family.
markk 4 months ago
Do you have any specific titles picked out yet?
Obsession with words 4 months ago
So far I have two books 1. A New World: An Epic of Colonial America from the Founding of Jamestown to the Fall of Quebec
by Arthur Quinn 2. Big Chief Elizabeth: The Adventures and Fate of the First English Colonists in America
by Giles Milton
markk 4 months ago
If you're open to suggestions, I'd recommend Alan Taylor's "American Colonies" for a general overview, David Hackett Fisher's "Albion's Seed" for how emigration from various areas of Britain shaped American regionalism, Fred Anderson's "Crucible of War" for the Seven Years War (if its length is an issue he also did a condensed volume), and Richard White's "The Middle Ground" for native-settler relations.
Obsession with words 4 months ago
Thanks, I am definitely open to suggestions. I´ll look these up.