Comments: 17
Do you like Kit Marlow?
BrokenTune 3 years ago
I don't know. The only one I have read by him is Doctor Faustus, and it's been so long that I can't remember much about it.
"Is this the face that launched a thousand ships?"

I think it was TA that told me that many scholars now believe that Henry VI (all three parts) was a Marlow-Shakespeare collaboration or possibly one adapting pre-existing work by the other.
BrokenTune 3 years ago
I started with H VI Pt.1 and even this edition lists this part as written by Shakespeare "and others".

There is a bit of an explanation from Wells et al., too, tho they do not mention Marlowe in this edition, yet:

"Nashe may have had personal reasons to puff this play: a variety of evidence suggests that Shakespeare wrote it in collaboration with at least two other authors; Nashe himself was probably responsible for Act i. The passages most confidently attributed to Shakespeare are Act 2, Scene 4 and Act 4, Scene 2 to the death of Talbot at 4.7.32."
BrokenTune 3 years ago
Btw, I didn't get very far with the play last night but am delighted with is so far:

- great obituary speeches to set things off
- Joan of Arc (even if portrayed in a horrible light...which does make sense in the time and place this description of her inhabits)
- a porter scene (there was one in Taming of the Shrew also but it is nice to see them evolve and to see that porter scenes were used throughout...not just in Macbeth). Btw, did Shakespeare's contemporaries use porter scenes as much? (Provided this part was written by S, rather than one of the "others".)
I don't remember any other porter scenes amongst other plays from the period, however, my memory is terrible.
BrokenTune 3 years ago
Let me see if I can find the the first one I noticed - the on in The Taming of the Shrew. It was a fledgling porter scene, essentially a knock-knock-joke...but still what would something leading up to a "porter scene".
BrokenTune 3 years ago
Found it: Act I, Scene 2:

"1.2 Enter Petruccio and his man, Grumio
PETRUCCIO
Verona, for a while I take my leave
To see my friends in Padua; but of all
My best-beloved and approved friend
Hortensio, and I trow this is his house.
Here, sirrah Grumio, knock, I say.

GRUMIO
Knock, sir? Whom should I knock?
Is there any man has rebused your worship?

PETRUCCIO
Villain, I say, knock me here soundly.

GRUMIO
Knock you here, sir?
Why, sir, what am I, sir, that I should knock you here, sir?

PETRUCCIO
Villain, I say, knock me at this gate,
And rap me well or I'll knock your knave's pate.

GRUMIO
My master is grown quarrelsome.
I should knock you first,
And then I know after who comes by the worst.

PETRUCCIO
Will it not be?
Faith, sirrah, an you'll not knock, I'll ring it.
I'll try how you can sol-fa and sing it.
[He wrings him by the ears. Grumio kneels]

GRUMIO
Help, masters, help! My master is mad.

PETRUCCIO
Now knock when I bid you, sirrah villain.
BrokenTune 3 years ago
It cracked me up, so if I ever came across other plays of the time I'd probably be on the look-out for similar scenes. :D
3 years ago
We've apparently got 5-7 cm. of snow coming. Brrr....
BrokenTune 3 years ago
Brrr...indeed. I hope it doesn't stay.
Murder by Death 3 years ago
We're having the same weather here (minus the fog, sadly; I like fog). There will be hot chocolate in my immediate future, though I haven't yet picked a read.

Enjoy!
BrokenTune 3 years ago
What read did you pick?
The fog was nice, but I'm glad it is gone now.
Murder by Death 3 years ago
I ended up going with the newest LynDee Walker not-cozy-not-thriller. About half way through so far and really hooked! :)
BrokenTune 3 years ago
Nice! That was the thriller in high heels that had a make-over, wasn't it? It sounded really good. :)
Murder by Death 3 years ago
Yes, same book. It's been so long since I've read a 'thriller' I don't know how it stacks up to others, but I enjoyed it very much. :)