Comments: 15
Lillelara 1 month ago
And that´s why I´m looking forward to the visit of the Surgeons museum :).


BrokenTune 1 month ago
I totally understand! I am looking forward to that, too!
BrokenTune 1 month ago
I wonder whether they have one of his carbolic steam apparatuses. I know there is one in Glasgow, but it would be neat if there was one at the Surgeon's Hall Museum, too.
Lillelara 1 month ago
As for Arthur Conan Doyle: I just ordered a book called "The Remedy". It´s about a guy, who has claimed to found a cure against Tuberculosis, until ACD found out that this remedy didn´t work. Apparently medical fraud was a thing even back then.
Honestly, I cannot wait to read that book. I bought it second hand, though, so I have to wait a couple of weeks until I´m holding it in my hands.
BrokenTune 1 month ago
Koch? I believe ACD fell out with Koch about his claim to have found a cure for TB. Let me check the Stashower biography...
Lillelara 1 month ago
That would be amazing if they have one of these apparatuses. We make a carbolic acid solution for one of our dermatologists and I genuinly hate that stuff. I´m definitely not happy that we have to work with it.
Lillelara 1 month ago
Yeah, it´s been Koch. I didn´t read the blurb, as you can tell ;D.
BrokenTune 1 month ago
Here's what Stashower's biography of ACD says about this:


"In August of 1890, the bacteriologist Robert Koch announced a bold new treatment for tuberculosis at the International Medical Congress of Berlin. Doctors from all over the world were traveling to Germany in huge numbers to see demonstrations of the new technique, which involved inoculation of the lymphatic system. Conan Doyle, who had recently defended the practice of compulsory smallpox vaccination in a letter to the press, could claim a legitimate medical interest in the topic. Even so, his abrupt decision to rush off to Berlin—literally at a few hours’ notice—speaks more of a restive spirit than a desire for medical enlightenment. “I could give no clear reason for this,” he admitted, “but it was an irresistible impulse and I at once determined to go. Had I been a well-known doctor or a specialist in consumption it would have been more intelligible, but I had, as a matter of fact, no great interest in the more recent developments of my own profession.”
Nevertheless, Conan Doyle left Southsea with his coattails flying, determined that he should witness this breaking story firsthand. On the way, he passed through London and called on the influential newspaperman W. T. Stead, then the editor of the Review of Reviews. Stead, Conan Doyle reported, was “very amiable to this big unknown provincial doctor,” and commissioned an article on Koch’s cure.
Conan Doyle arrived in Berlin and found himself unable to get tickets for any of Koch’s demonstrations. Undaunted, he went to the home of Koch himself, but got no farther than the doctor’s front hall. There, he watched as a postal worker dumped out a huge sack of letters onto the floor of Koch’s reception area. As he ran his eye over the letters, which bore stamps from all over Europe, Conan Doyle felt a sense of shock over “all the sad broken lives and wearied hearts which were turning in hope to Berlin.” He knew that hundreds of stricken consumptives were struggling to reach Germany for the miracle cure, many of them so ill that they died en route. It seemed to him, given that Koch’s findings had not yet been verified, that a “wave of madness had seized the world.”
Having failed to get a ticket for one of the demonstrations, Conan Doyle had to satisfy himself with a set of lecture notes. These convinced him that the extravagant claims for Koch’s new treatment were premature. In his view, countless victims of tuberculosis were clinging to a vain hope.

He returned to his hotel and dashed off a letter to the Daily Telegraph. While praising the “noble modesty” of Koch himself, who remained at work in his laboratory while others demonstrated his technique, Conan Doyle attacked the Berlin findings as incomplete and inconclusive.
“The sooner that this is recognized the less chance will there be of serious disappointment among those who are looking to Berlin for a panacea for their own or their friends’ ill-health,” he wrote. He amplified the point in his article for the Review of Reviews: “It would be an encouraging of false hopes to pretend that the result is in any way assured.”
One may well question the authority by which Conan Doyle could make such a pronouncement. He was an unknown doctor with little experience of tuberculosis, and he had not even seen an official demonstration of the technique. Under the circumstances, he had little to gain in swimming against the tide of medical opinion. It pained him, however, to think of all the cases of suffering represented by that enormous sack of letters, and he felt a duty to express his reservations in the most public forum available to him.
As it happened, subsequent events confirmed his doubts about Koch’s findings, and Conan Doyle took great pride in the fact that his warnings had been justified. This was the first time he had taken up what might be called a public crusade, and he developed a taste for it."

Stashower, Daniel. Teller of Tales (p. 113). Henry Holt and Co.. Kindle Edition.
Lillelara 1 month ago
Thanks! This sounds fascinating.
Lillelara 1 month ago
Tbh, this makes this book even more interesting.
BrokenTune 1 month ago
It does!
BrokenTune 1 month ago
I'm intrigued by The Remedy. Let me know when it arrives and how it works out!
Lillelara 1 month ago
Will do :)
BrokenTune 1 month ago
That was a bloody brilliant book. Thanks for recommending it. :D
Lillelara 1 month ago
You‘re welcome. And I‘m so glad that you enjoyed it too :D