Comments: 20
I haven't (read it). Looking at the cover, I wondered why the heck you were going anywhere near this ... now I understand. Fingers crossed.
Abandoned by user 2 years ago
I have not. It's extremely unlikely that I would ever read this, although you can let us know if it is at least bearable.
BrokenTune 2 years ago
Well, I've given this 64 pages and I had issues:

1. Chick-lit style of writing from the mother's point of view. (I don't like her.)
2. The voice of the child is creepy. Not because it is scaring me, but because it is precocious and makes me cringe a lot.
3. Does this couple who have lost a child ever actually talk to each other?

Anyway by page 64, I was bored with the writing and skipped to the end of the book.

The is a veritable feast of tropes (as if the dysfunctional couple, twins, remote Scottish island, and Dad's drinking aren't enough already).
So, I'd say safe yourselves the trouble.
Darth Pedant 2 years ago
Ack, if I had gotten up earlier I could have warned you, but alas. I made it all the way through and I didn't hate it, but my main questions were "So where was the thrilling part?" and "Why did I bother?" (In case you're curious, the answers are "LOL What thrilling part?" and "To fill in a Halloween Bingo square." XD
BrokenTune 2 years ago
*****SPOILERS*******

It's definitely one of those books that only has a story because the main characters are idiots and don't talk to each other. Thrilling it was not. And - LOL - that ending ... Bwahahaha. I laughed out loud at the letter revealing the Transient Global Amnesia already but it could only get more ridiculous after that.
Darth Pedant 2 years ago
More ridiculous and EVEN MORE TROPE-ERRIFIC. At the end, it just felt like one clumsy fake-out after another. If eye-rolling burned calories, I would have lost ten pounds in two days.
BrokenTune 2 years ago
Oh, I hear you! One of these days, I'll create a "trope bingo card" for books like this one.
BrokenTune 2 years ago
DP, I saw you just started The Dry. I hope you like it better than I did. :)
Darth Pedant 2 years ago
Haha, yes. I picked it up while browsing at the library. I knew I'd seen it somewhere recently, and I couldn't remember where. It wasn't until I was adding it to my shelf that I realized it was one of the books you'd just dnf'd. Ah, well. If I don't like it, I can't say you didn't warn me. XD
BrokenTune 2 years ago
I'm really curious how you'll like it. I can't even put my finger on why it didn't grab me.
BrokenTune 2 years ago
Btw, DP, in The Ice Twins, did you also find it odd how Angus (the hubby) reacted when Sarah confronts him with accusations about what she thought he had done (after she talked to the surviving twin)? He was all like "But I didn't. So, there. Let's move on." It was the least realistic conversation ever.
Darth Pedant 2 years ago
I didn't think many of their interactions resembled normal human behavior, and in my opinion it's because the author tried too hard with the unreliable narrator thing. There were a bunch of disconnects like the one you mentioned, and the author tried to justify the total breakdown in communication by having Angus be afraid of triggering another depressive episode in Sarah, which is why he never just sits down and tells her the whole truth. The result was that whole "let's never talk anything out and just have angry sex instead" thing, and I was not a fan of it. I think my favorite part was when Sarah accused Angus of having an affair *during* angry sex, and they just keep going. Yep. Just a totally normal human interaction.
Darth Pedant 2 years ago
Re: The Dry, I'm a little bit past where you stopped. I'm wondering if the flatness of the characters is intentional. It's almost hyper realism. The setting of an outback farming community going under after years of unrelenting drought is all too real, and the utter hopelessness of the situation grinds people down. I've seen it on the news every week for almost as long as I've been in Australia. So the problem might not be flat characters so much as an accurate and depressing-as-hell depiction of characters watching their town and farms shrivel up and die and their hearts and souls with it.
BrokenTune 2 years ago
Ok, that could well be and in that case the book might have worked for me because of lack of context.
I really hope the book as a whole works better for you than for me.

Re Ice Twins - Omg that scene was so...incomprehensible.
As much fun as a trope bingo card sounds, somehow a clean, easy, early DNF sounds like the more economical (and ultimately less painful) solution ...

Totally with you on the "get out of my life" sentiment.
BrokenTune 2 years ago
I did come away with a sense of pride that my instincts about plot descriptions and style (gathered within the first few pages) work pretty well for me. ;)
Well, you did have ample "training" lately ... :(
BrokenTune 2 years ago
To be fair, some of those I expected. In a way, it's a way to clear out some of the less promising Mt. TBR titles.
Abandoned by user 2 years ago
In the post-Gone-Girl world, most of those "domestic thrillers" seem to use poorly executed unreliable narrators. Unfortunately, all that means is that readers are hyper vigilant looking for them, so even if they are well executed (and they almost never are), they are scarcely a surprise. Also, idiotic behavior among characters is de rigeur.

I basically don't read anything that fits into that category anymore, after a series of really bad experiences (The Girl on the Train; The Girl Before; The Turn of the Key).
BrokenTune 2 years ago
I kinda feel bad that I have read none of them, including Gone Girl. I feel like I should at least read Gone Girl, but every time I've tried to look for it at the library I ended up bringing home a Highsmith instead.