Comments: 5
Darth Pedant 8 years ago
I didn't say it wasn't. I said the racism goes beyond that. Mitchell herself held a lot of racist views, which come out pretty plainly in the voice of the omniscient narrator. The slaves for the most part are described as stupid, sly, slow creatures who need their benevolent masters to give them purpose and direction. At 17% I'm still forming overall impressions, but so far one of those impressions has a distinct racist propaganda flavor. Not so much a "this is how it was" feel as a "this is how it should be" feel. I'm having trouble articulating my impressions, so I hope that makes sense in some fashion.
Darth Pedant 8 years ago
Upon further reflection, maybe both the book and Mitchell are purely products of their time and environment. The Georgia Mitchell grew up in was still hella racist and boiling over with resentment over the outcome of the Civil War (hell, parts of the deep south are STILL like that). I guess what's really bothering me is that by most people of my present-day predominantly white acquaintance this book is hailed as an epic Civil War romance with nary a mention of the romanticizing of slavery. (We've probably got the movie to thank for that.) Anyhow, I'd like to think I'm not the only white person I know who died a little inside when Dilcey thanked Gerald for buying both her and her daughter. And it kind of kills me that this won a Pulitzer. F you, humanity! :p