Comments: 24
Tannat 7 years ago
Hey, you forgot your Bookstooge Lady Romance Project tag.
Darth Pedant 7 years ago
There's a tag?!?
Tannat 7 years ago
A lot of people are using the tag "Bookstooge Lady Romance Project" tag to make the posts easier to find, especially if you don't happen to be following everyone participating.
http://booklikes.com/tag/bookstooge-lady-romance-project

I noticed because I saw your post, but didn't remember it popping up when I searched by the tag.
Darth Pedant 7 years ago
Tags added. Thanks for the heads-up! :) I hardly ever pay attention to tags and hadn't even noticed.
Tannat 7 years ago
I've frequently had to go back in to edit my posts to add them, myself.
Murder by Death 7 years ago
I put off reading more last night because I didn't want to get too far ahead and not be able to talk about stuff without revealing spoilers.

But yeah, that was some killer rationalisation wasn't it? Between the scene in the blackberry brambles and the outright use of "wanton slut" I'm having to radically revise my mental image of Heyer. Up until this book, everything of hers I'd read was light and clever, or languid and Bright Young Thing-ish (her mysteries).

I'm not opposed to the woman getting some blame - I've seen male friends of mine get twisted around and manipulated by women and lose their common sense - but the total absolution Venetia leans towards is a fantasy, and the brutal judgement and use of terms like "wanton slut"... well, Heyer is let her 1950's mentality slip through.
Darth Pedant 7 years ago
I'm a little worried about getting too far ahead, but I'm a one-book-at-a-time reader and I have a lot of downtime this week and no self-control. Maybe I should start putting my updates under spoiler tags, just to be safe. :)

My previous Heyer experience consists of two books (one mystery, one romance), and I don't remember them being so 1950's sexist. If this had been my first Heyer I may not have bought eight more Heyers during a Kindle sale. I'm hoping this book is an outlier, or that Venetia gets some common sense knocked into her while the rogue reformation gets underway. Buyer's remorse is a terrible thing. ;)
Tannat 7 years ago
I'm hoping her others are better too. So far this is risking turning into a "Book bust or bummer" square rather than maybe the "Dead author" square. I don't necessarily mind showing a cad with a heart of gold or whatever but this just doesn't seem to be done in a convincing manner. I'm going to read a bit more of Venetia and may post an update later. I have been juggling multiple books.(four if you count the audio).
Murder by Death 7 years ago
I'm not hating it so far, but I am having to suspend my disbelief further than I expected to (and my patience).

Perhaps Heyer is pulling a "look how besotted Venetia is even though she denies it" sort of thing?
Tannat 7 years ago
Well, I'm judging it partly on what you have said since you have read further than I at this point. It's not a question of suspending disbelief so much as having no sympathy for Venetia. Plus my language complaints...
Abandoned by user 7 years ago
Thinking about this, I think that what Venetia is essentially accepting is a framing of Damerel's story where he was the besotted young man who was manipulated by the older, beautiful, and more experienced married woman. She may even see Aubrey as a stand-in for the person that Damerel was when he made the decision to run away with the married woman. If she sees him as fundamentally an innocent (like her beloved Aubrey), even if she is factually incorrect, then she would certainly hold him less accountable in her mind for his behavior.

I wasn't paying as much attention to this part of the story as I might have had I thought to focus on it, but I can certainly conceive of a situation where the woman would be more responsible than the man under such circumstances - and one of them would include an older woman manipulating a callow youth (in the same way that an older man can manipulate a young woman). So, what I don't know is: how old and inexperienced was Damerel when this happened versus how old and experienced was the woman who ran off with him.
Murder by Death 7 years ago
This is the angle I'm guessing Heyer is working from, and I *think* somewhere in that first 100 pages, he alludes to his age when he ran off (he did get as far as Oxford, but I think Aubrey makes a comment about a pity he hadn't finished), and earlier on, when there was gossip about Lord D. someone mentions the woman was x years older (8 maybe? - but I might be confusing that with the 6 year difference between Oswald and Venetia).

His description of events to Venetia certainly paints him as a stupid young boy swept away by the romance of it all, but then, it's in his best interests to paint himself that way.
Darth Pedant 7 years ago
He was 22, she was "a few years older" according to Lady Denny (chapter 3). I haven't come across a more specific age for her.
Murder by Death 7 years ago
Ah, thanks! You'd think 22 would be old enough to have some sense, but it isn't always. I know; I have that t-shirt. :P
Abandoned by user 7 years ago
It is old enough to have some sense, definitely.

One of the common themes in Heyer's books seems to be a theory that young men are accorded total freedom with little responsibility. She permits them to frequently gamble away the family fortune necessitating unfortunate sisters and mothers to live in penury, to fall in love with actresses and moon about like ninnies, and to maul unsuspecting young women (cough, Oswald, cough) without repercussion.

It's actually one of the things that I find most irritating about her books and it is a constant theme of Regency romance in general. I don't know if this was an actual societal construct or if it is just a plot device that she used and that other authors therefore copied.
Murder by Death 7 years ago
Me at 22 = chock full of good intentions but not even the amount of sense god gives doorknobs. :D
Abandoned by user 7 years ago
I bet you had enough sense not to live so far beyond your means that your family was required to live in penury to support your debts of honor and gambling habit. ;)
Murder by Death 7 years ago
Safe bet. Sadly not enough sense to avoid a marriage that left *me* in penury, but oh well. If I had to learn that lesson, I'm glad it was at 22 not 44. :P
Murder by Death 7 years ago
But, hang on, did Lord D's idiocy leave his parents in penury? I was under the impression that they were find, but he blew through his "handsome" inheritance partying hard after his parents both died. Did I read that wrong (I might have)?
Abandoned by user 7 years ago
I was really thinking more broadly of the character tropes in regency novels in general. Not of Damerel!
Murder by Death 7 years ago
Ah, ok. Of course. Just making sure I hadn't missed an (additional) character flaw.
Darth Pedant 7 years ago
These lady romances are not for the faint of heart! Or the high of blood pressure. (Actually, I'm laughing more than I'm growling, but still. Oy.)