Comments: 3
Ugh. Worse than expected, then! :( Thanks for taking this one for the team ... (or, Flat Book Society readers).
Elentarri's Book Blog 3 years ago
It's not quite in the "burn on the bonfire"categorie, but if I had actually bought the book, it would be in a box labelled "emergency toilet paper".

I managed to find decent pictures on the first try. Switek didn't even try! And using The Guardian and, I think it was, the Daily Mail as a reference!!!????!! Not to mention all the personal opinions about stuff he doesn't understand properly. Switek should have read a forensic anthropology textbook or at least watched "Bones". He would then have had a bit more accurate information than what he blathered about in his book.

BTW - Mutants: On Genetic Variety and the Human Body by Armand Marie Leroi is a decent book about genetics and the end physical result when things go a bit wrong. It also has illustrations. I learnt more about bone "diseases" from that book than the book specifically about bones.
Well, the Guardian at least takes their science seriously (and they're definitely not a tabloid), but the Daily Mail?? Honestly ...

I mean, I'd still expect him to use the actual science publication as his source obviously. But if you're going to show that the story (whichever it is) was important enough to make headlines in more than "merely" the science community, do me a favor and at least don't pick the newspaper that's so notorious for its sensationalist and flat-out wrong science reporting that even Wikipedia has banned it as a source! (https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/feb/08/wikipedia-bans-daily-mail-as-unreliable-source-for-website; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daily_Mail)

Noted about "Mutants".