Comments: 7
Debbie's Spurts 4 months ago
The stew on the Bunsen burner is so burned into my childhood memories from this one!
JL's Bibliomania 4 months ago
:-)
Mystereity 4 months ago
All of this confirms my reluctance to watch this. You can't improve on a classic.
Debbie's Spurts 4 months ago
I haven't seen the movie yet. One of the worst movie adaptations for twisting things, IMHO, was "The Scarlet Letter" movie where the reverend wound up redeeming himself tiowards the end hy standing up for her, taking responsibility, becoming good dad ... just way too different from the book.
JL's Bibliomania 4 months ago
Despite my quibbles above, I'd urge going to see it. One of my friends, who says that A Wrinkle in Time was her favorite book as a tween, absolutely loves it and while different thinks it does an admirable job capturing the soul of the story.
Moonlight Madness 4 months ago
One of L'Engle's greatest strengths as a writer, in my opinion, is her ability to write family life vignettes in a way that is appealing without devolving into twee. Like J.K. Rowling, when she gives us the opportunity to visit The Burrow, L'Engle's family scenes are lovely, realistic and filled with warmth. The bunsen burner scene is definitely one of those scenes.

I really enjoyed the adaptation, even if I do think that du Vernay was a bit too unkind to Mr. Murry, and the bit where Reese Witherspoon transforms into a leaf of what looks like flying lettuce was over-the-top weird even for a sci fi film.
JL's Bibliomania 4 months ago
"One of L'Engle's greatest strengths as a writer, in my opinion, is her ability to write family life vignettes in a way that is appealing without devolving into twee." - Exactly! Though as an SF/Fantasy obsessed tween, I didn't read many of her other stories.