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Laurie R. King
New York Times bestselling crime writer Laurie R. King writes both series and standalone novels.In the Mary Russell series (first entry: The Beekeeper's Apprentice), fifteen-year-old Russell meets Sherlock Holmes on the Sussex Downs in 1915, becoming his apprentice, then his partner. The series... show more

New York Times bestselling crime writer Laurie R. King writes both series and standalone novels.In the Mary Russell series (first entry: The Beekeeper's Apprentice), fifteen-year-old Russell meets Sherlock Holmes on the Sussex Downs in 1915, becoming his apprentice, then his partner. The series follows their amiably contentious partnership into the 1920s as they challenge each other to ever greater feats of detection. The Kate Martinelli series, starting with A Grave Talent, concerns a San Francisco homicide inspector, her SFPD partner, and her life partner. In the course of the series, Kate encounters a female Rembrandt, a modern-day Holy Fool, two difficult teenagers, a manifestation of the goddess Kali and an eighty-year-old manuscript concerning'Sherlock Holmes.King also has written stand-alone novels--the historical thriller Touchstone, A Darker Place, two loosely linked novels'Folly and Keeping Watch--and a science fiction novel, Califia's Daughters, under the pseudonym Leigh Richards. King grew up reading her way through libraries like a termite through balsa before going on to become a mother, builder, world traveler, and theologian. She has now settled into a genteel life of crime, back in her native northern California. She has a secondary residence in cyberspace, where she enjoys meeting readers in her Virtual Book Club and on her blog. King has won the Edgar and Creasey awards (for A Grave Talent), the Nero (for A Monstrous Regiment of Women) and the MacCavity (for Folly); her nominations include the Agatha, the Orange, the Barry, and two more Edgars. She was also given an honorary doctorate from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific. Check out King's website, http://laurierking.com/, and follow the links to her blog and Virtual Book Club, featuring monthly discussions of her work, with regular visits from the author herself. And for regular LRK updates, follow the link to sign up for her email newsletter.
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Community Reviews
Obsession with words
Obsession with words rated it 3 years ago
Anne Waverly, a respected University professor who specializes in alternative religious movements, goes undercover again to learn more about a community called Change that has branches in Arizona, England, and Japan. She found it easy to get into the community when a young girl, who looked a lot lik...
Impulsive Reader
Impulsive Reader rated it 3 years ago
Don't get me wrong, I owe a lot to Laurie R. King. Her Mary Russell series is what really got me into Sherlock Holmes in the first place. (It also gave me a healthy, if often unfulfilled, love of Sherlockian romance--but that's a conversation for another day.) That being said, I have never read a ...
YA Fantasy - K.A. Wiggins
YA Fantasy - K.A. Wiggins rated it 3 years ago
Another brilliant read, full of characters, places, and situations that it's a joy to get to know. While I love the Mary Russell character/stories best, this near-present-day urban mystery is beautifully written, elaborately detailed and philosophically complex. Reaching for the next already!
YA Fantasy - K.A. Wiggins
YA Fantasy - K.A. Wiggins rated it 3 years ago
Enjoyable 1920s mystery-thriller with a distinctly creepy vibe. Works in a large and colourful cast of American and Parisian artists of note. Complex, twisty plot with more of an edgy note than King's Holmes & Russell mysteries.
YA Fantasy - K.A. Wiggins
YA Fantasy - K.A. Wiggins rated it 3 years ago
Effective period spy thriller. It seems to pick up on elements of her longer Holmes/Russell series, with Watson & Holmes type traits spread among the cast and an emphasis on discussing the woman's role(s) in society at the time. Enjoyable and unexpected. In the style of classic literature, it has ...
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