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Philip Freeman
Philip Freeman is the Orlando W. Qualley Chair of Classical Languages at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in Classical Philology and Celtic Languages and Literatures. He has taught at Boston University and Washington University in St. Louis and lectured... show more



Philip Freeman is the Orlando W. Qualley Chair of Classical Languages at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in Classical Philology and Celtic Languages and Literatures. He has taught at Boston University and Washington University in St. Louis and lectured at the Smithsonian Institution. His books have been reviewed in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and other national publications.

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Community Reviews
Musings/Träumereien/Devaneios
Musings/Träumereien/Devaneios rated it 2 years ago
Cicero was full of shit.Though I did some Classics in the 80s, I barely read any Cicero. (This was out of personal indolence, not the fault of my courses...) He is one of the people from the Graeco-Roman world I really would like to read a bit more of than I did back then - probably in translation o...
That's What She Read
That's What She Read rated it 5 years ago
The Blogging of a Book Addict
The Blogging of a Book Addict rated it 7 years ago
Not nearly as in depth as it could have been, hence the missing star, but interesting, insightful, intelligent, and very well arranged. Definitely a must read for anyone with an interest in politics, either modern or ancient, or someone with an interest in Cicero himself.
Victoria Reads Books
Victoria Reads Books rated it 7 years ago
Although men running for positions of power in the Roman Republic were deemed candidati- ‘made shining white’, due to their artificially white togas- their methods of winning elections were oftentimes anything but. In fact, Quintus Tullius Cicero informs readers in his Commentariolum Petitionis (Lit...
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