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Reading Lolita in Tehran - Azar Nafisi
Reading Lolita in Tehran
by: (author)
4.00 5
We all have dreams—things we fantasize about doing and generally never get around to. This is the story of Azar Nafisi’s dream and of the nightmare that made it come true.For two years before she left Iran in 1997, Nafisi gathered seven young women at her house every Thursday morning to read and... show more
We all have dreams—things we fantasize about doing and generally never get around to. This is the story of Azar Nafisi’s dream and of the nightmare that made it come true.For two years before she left Iran in 1997, Nafisi gathered seven young women at her house every Thursday morning to read and discuss forbidden works of Western literature. They were all former students whom she had taught at university. Some came from conservative and religious families, others were progressive and secular; several had spent time in jail. They were shy and uncomfortable at first, unaccustomed to being asked to speak their minds, but soon they began to open up and to speak more freely, not only about the novels they were reading but also about themselves, their dreams and disappointments. Their stories intertwined with those they were reading—Pride and Prejudice, Washington Square, Daisy Miller and Lolita—their Lolita, as they imagined her in Tehran.Nafisi’s account flashes back to the early days of the revolution, when she first started teaching at the University of Tehran amid the swirl of protests and demonstrations. In those frenetic days, the students took control of the university, expelled faculty members and purged the curriculum. When a radical Islamist in Nafisi’s class questioned her decision to teach The Great Gatsby, which he saw as an immoral work that preached falsehoods of “the Great Satan,” she decided to let him put Gatsby on trial and stood as the sole witness for the defense.Azar Nafisi’s luminous tale offers a fascinating portrait of the Iran-Iraq war viewed from Tehran and gives us a rare glimpse, from the inside, of women’s lives in revolutionary Iran. It is a work of great passion and poetic beauty, written with a startlingly original voice.From the Hardcover edition.
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Format: kindle
ASIN: B000FC0XY6
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
Pages no: 384
Edition language: English
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Community Reviews
Feminism in Cold Storage
Feminism in Cold Storage rated it
5.0 Reading Lolita in Tehran
This is one of those books that comes along and turns everything you thought you knew upside down. I loved every minute of it and can't wait to read more from Nafisi. She manages to do so much in this book. It just amazes me. She makes me want to read everything over again (except Lolita which I rea...
Silvie's bookshelf
Silvie's bookshelf rated it
3.0 Reading Lolita in Tehran
Excellent book. The mix of literature as a way to escape the drama of war and the author's desire to stay true to her self make this memoir an essential reading for any woman living in a liberal country.
A Reading Vocation
A Reading Vocation rated it
4.0 Book 54/100: Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi
Around the Year Reading Challenge Item #11: A Book from the Rory Gilmore Reading ChallengeGosh, I wish I hadn't waited so long to write this review.This book was different than I expected it to be. Based on its descriptions, I thought it would be focused on the lives of the girls in the authors book...
Summer Reading Project, BookLikes Satellite
Summer Reading Project, BookLikes Satellite rated it
5.0 Reading Lolita in Tehran, by Azar Nafisi
Literature matters. I could argue for hours about the importance of stories and the transformative powers of words. But whatever I say pales in comparison to the experience of people like Azar Nafisi, who lived in Iran for 18 years during a time when literature was a matter of life and death. Her me...
Lisa (Harmony)
Lisa (Harmony) rated it
4.0 Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books
This did lure me in and eventually beguile me, but certainly not from the first. Nafisi warns from the introduction that she would be changing details of the people presented not just to shield them from persecution but protect their privacy. I admit, I’ve become wary of creative non-fiction that ad...
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