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Svetlana Alexievich
Svetlana Alexievich was born in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine, in 1948 and has spent most of her life in the Soviet Union and present-day Belarus, with prolonged periods of exile in Western Europe. Starting out as a journalist, she developed her own nonfiction genre, which gathers a chorus of voices... show more



Svetlana Alexievich was born in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine, in 1948 and has spent most of her life in the Soviet Union and present-day Belarus, with prolonged periods of exile in Western Europe. Starting out as a journalist, she developed her own nonfiction genre, which gathers a chorus of voices to describe a specific historical moment. Her works include The Unwomanly Face of War (1985), Last Witnesses (1985), Zinky Boys (1990), Voices from Chernobyl (1997), and Secondhand Time (2013). She has won many international awards, including the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature “for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.”

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Birth date: May 31, 1948
Category:
History, Non Fiction
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Chris' Fish Place
Chris' Fish Place rated it 2 weeks ago
I read this after watching the HBO mini series about the disaster. If you have seen it, the firefighter’s wife, the one who follows her husband, her account opens this collection of oral histories. It pretty sets the stage for the rest of the history that follows. It is not easy reading. There are b...
Lillelara
Lillelara rated it 2 years ago
I went into the Zone from the very beginning. I remember stopping in a village being struck by the silence. No birds, nothing. You walk down a street … silence. Well, of course, I knew all the cottages were lifeless, that there were no people because they had all left, but everything around had fall...
philoSophie
philoSophie rated it 2 years ago
I used to understand our way of life… The way we lived used to make sense to me… Now, I don’t understand anything anymore… None of it makes any sense at all…Προφορικές διηγήσεις νοσταλγίας, στέρησης, υπερηφάνειας και ντροπής, απομυθοποίησης, εθνικισμού• οι ιστορίες υφαίνονται από εκατοντάδες συνεντε...
Tannat
Tannat rated it 2 years ago
This just wasn't what I was expecting. It's just a bunch of snippets of women telling their war stories without any kind of overarching narrative or background. Not a bad book in itself, but I'm not interested in reading 300 pages of this.
Muccamukk
Muccamukk rated it 3 years ago
It took me a long time to read this because it was so brutal, but it was exceptionally well written and put together. I really liked the progression of stories told in it, and how well she captured her subjects and compiled them. It really did feel like a huge discordant chorus of voices.I would hav...
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