logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: 2017-reads
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-29 01:35
Hidden Figures
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race - Margot Lee Shetterly

Hidden Figures tells the story of the role that women “computers,” particularly female African-American “computers” played in the birth of the aeronautics industry.  This is an important story, a story that should have been better known a long time ago, especially considering how important race and gender were, and still are, in the US.

 

Biographies tell what people did; the best also tell who people were – their personalities and what they cared about.  1st time author, Ms. Shetterley generally does a good, though dry, job telling a story about Dorothy Vaughn, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden.  But at the end I didn’t feel like I know the women themselves. I am currently #65 on the hold list for the movie.  I wonder if I’ll have a better sense for who Dorothy, Mary, Katherine and Christine really are after watching some of the scenes I just read about come to life.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-04-28 22:45
A bit scientific but a book for lovers of words, all words
What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves - Benjamin K. Bergen

A couple of books published recently have tackled the heretofore taboo yet titillating topic of taboo/profane words. This is the one that I just happened to buy but I guess that it could have been anyone of them. The title was read by the author and I usually avoid self-read titles because just because you can write beautifully doesn't mean that you are pleasant to listen to for multiple hours. Bergen is an exception to the rule; he reads as well as he writes. The book is nicely organized. It has a basis in scientific research and is filled with anecdotal evidence to support the points he is trying to make. He writes for a broad audience not academia.

 

Warning, if you hearing/reading taboo/obscene/profane language in any context offends, this book might not be for you. Bergen's over-all intent is not to offend but to explore the topic and discuss its social ramifications. Four-letter words are here to stay; we might as well learn a little bit more about them.

 

If nothing else, this book made me think and it made me want to set my thoughts to paper. I don't have a problem with declaring some words to be taboo--particularly slurs. In fact, I am actually in favor of it. Except for slurs, I also don't have a problem with judiciously using taboo words in my own speech. However, I think that one should not use them with impunity (that is the way I was brought up); there is a time and a place and an appropriate audience. I still don't drop f-bombs in front of my parents, who I don't think I have ever heard use the word, and I don't regularly sprinkle my speech them (to the effect that when I use them, they are powerful!). I don't full agree with Bergen's take on our attempts to censor speech.  I'm in favor of censorship on the airwaves and of ratings of TV, movies and videogames that protect my right not to have to hear any of these words or to have my children hear these words. It should be up to me when I want to hear taboo speech and under what circumstances. I'm not against free speech; I'm just against those who think that just because they say it that others want to hear it or even have to reach positively to their utterances. If you insist on peppering each sentence you utter with f-bombs this that and the other, you will soon find that we aren't having very many conversations. Daddy always said that smart people don't need to use taboo language to express themselves and that has always formed the way I try to speak. But yeah, I'm no goody-two-shoes; I do have my moments.

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-28 14:51
Destined for an Early Grave (Night Huntress #4) by Jeaniene Frost
Destined for an Early Grave - Jeaniene Frost

 

 

Her deadly dreams leave her in grave danger

Since half-vampire Cat Crawfield and her undead lover Bones met six years ago, they've fought against the rogue undead, battled a vengeful Master vampire, and pledged their devotion with a blood bond. Now it's time for a vacation. But their hopes for a perfect Paris holiday are dashed when Cat awakes one night in terror. She's having visions of a vampire named Gregor who's more powerful than Bones and has ties to her past that even Cat herself didn't know about.

Gregor believes Cat is his and he won't stop until he has her. As the battle begins between the vamp who haunts her nightmares and the one who holds her heart, only Cat can break Gregor's hold over her. She'll need all the power she can summon in order to bring down the baddest bloodsucker she's ever faced . . . even if getting that power will result in an early grave

 

 

 

This book was another roller coaster live that is Cat and Bones. While Cat is moving around a lot in this book she still is with all the familiar faces, some more than others.

Since meeting Bones and teaming up with him, Cat had many challenges but this one might be one of the biggest yet. This book pushed Cat like never before with people and events all over the place. Past things that she forgot will be revealed to her and that will cause many changes with a lot of trouble, for Cat and Bones and them as a couple.

I really liked Cat in this book, while she was strong and never gave up she also had some weak moments that made her even more likeable.

Bones, oh man I really wanted to kill him in this book, while it all turned out okay I don’t think he was right to be such a big jerk to her and even his friends.

I really loved the friendship that grew between Vlad and Cat, I think it is good for Cat to have him as a friend. 

There is so much going on in this book that I don’t know what to say or write without spoiling it to everyone who hasn’t read it yet, so I will keep this review shorter.

There are some major things happening not only to Cat who is battling with Gregor in her sleep as well while she is awake but also to her friends and family.

We have some big battles and with those some big loses, that were both surprising and heartbreaking.

This book kept me on the edge of my seat throughout the book. Some big twists are happening and every time you think, that it will calm down it picks you right back up.

I laughed, and I cried and was honestly shocked at some outcomes of the book.

While Cat and Bones are pretty much in the outs in this book and apart for the better part of it we still get plenty of them together .

Overall great book, best so far, at least for me and I rate it 5★

 

 

Some of my favorite quotes

 

“Movies. Drinks. Headless chickens. You know, girl stuff. ”

 

***

 

“Bloody hell, Kitten. Never thought to be flogged by my own furniture. Do you know I saw bloomin' stars when that cracked over my nog?”

***

“Slumber party with Dracula, all things considerd why not?”

 

***

 

“Trying to wake you,” Bones answered crisply. “I cut you, threw water on you, slapped you, and set a lighter to your legs. For future reference, which one

of those do you think worked?”

“Good God,” I hissed. “No wonder I thought you were Death incarnate in my dream, and that made me run toward Gregor at first!”

 

***

 

 

goodreads-badge-add-plus-

 

 

Available NOW 

 

 

amazonBig bnbuy KoboButton

 

 

Jeaniene Frost

 

Jeaniene Frost is the New York Times, USA Today, and international bestselling author of the Night Huntress series, the Night Prince series and the Broken Destiny series. To date, foreign rights for her novels have sold to twenty different countries. Jeaniene lives in North Carolina with her husband Matthew, who long ago accepted that she rarely cooks and always sleeps in on the weekends. Aside from writing, Jeaniene enjoys reading, poetry, watching movies with her husband, exploring old cemeteries, spelunking and traveling – by car. Airplanes, children, and cook books frighten her.

For information on Jeaniene's books, reading the first 20% of each book free, book trailers, deleted scenes, creature mythology, and more, please visit: www.jeanienefrost.com

 

 

Links

 

Website *** Faceboook *** Twitter *** Amazon

Snoopydoo sigi

Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/destined-early-grave-night-huntress-4-jeaniene-frost
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-04-27 23:32
Bucket List Reading
The Iliad of Homer - Elizabeth Vandiver
The Odyssey of Homer - Elizabeth Vandiver,The Great Courses,The Great Courses
The Iliad & The Odyssey - Homer,John Lescault

I finally checked off another item on my literary bucket list: The Iliad and the Odyssey. I've had the audio version in my TBR for a couple of years now but very recently picked up these two Great Course lectures to read along with the The I & The O so that maybe I would get more out of the story. It was a good move on my part.

 

However, I bought and listened to the two lectures in the wrong order, thinking that they were two free standing lectures lecture series. Actually, they should be read in the same order as the two epics. Not that they weren't helpful but that there was general info in The Iliad lectures that would have been helpful to have heard before listening to the two epics--not after.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-04-27 16:00
Just not as good as I was hoping for
The Crime at Black Dudley - Margery Allingham,David Thorpe

The narrator killed this book for me--and not in a good way. I listened to the whole thing but it was a battle, with a lousy narrator who made very poor choices for the voicing of the various characters (none of them sounded realistic, especially Albert Campion)) and a plot that was full of holes and full of inconsistencies.Other words that come to mind to describe this book are melodrama, caricature and misogynistic (or perhaps just dated the attitudes toward women). It might do better as a film--a period piece in black and white.

 

Fortunately, a couple of the other titles in the series use a different narrator and I may try them to see if this author improves with age and a different narrator.

 

Overall, two stars-- three for the story reduced by one for the narration.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?