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text 2018-11-20 17:13
Moonlight Snow's 2018 Bookish Advent Tracking Post

 

I will be tracking my bookish advent season here! I'm still in the process of organizing things, but I think I've got things dialed in at this point, and I can focus more on the tasks/reading

 

 

RUNNING TOTAL: 9

 

Planning update:

 

With U.S. Thanksgiving on Thursday, I should have a bit of extra time to read and post. Like MBD, I plan on a bit of a flood of catching up on tasks - including some for my as yet uncompleted holidays: Diwali & International Day of Tolerance.

 

I've also got some books on my agenda: I picked up one of Cara Black's Aimee LeDuc books on my last trip to Wallace Books, which will fulfill the reading component of International Day of Tolerance (set in Paris), and I have the second Jane Harper mystery - Force of Nature - checked out of the library, which will fulfill the reading component of Melbourne Cup (set in Australia). I'm also considering between a few non-fiction possibilities for the reading element of Diwali.

 

Door 7: Mawlid

 

Task 1:  Make two “prophesies” you think will come to fruition in 2019 in your personal or reading life.

 

Task 2: The Five Pillars of Islam include almsgiving and the pilgrimage to Mekka. Tell us: Have you ever donated books or rescued them from (horror of horrors) being trashed? Alternatively: Is there a book-related place that is a place of pilgrimage to you?

 

Task 3: Prophets are messengers. Tell us: Which book characters are your favorite messengers (no matter whether humans, angels, (demi)gods, etc.)? Samwise Gamgee!

 

Task 4: Muhammad was a merchant before becoming a religious leader. List 5 books on your shelves in which a key character makes / undergoes a radical career change.

 

Book:  If you can find a copy, read Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet.  Or read any book about a leader of a movement, nation, religion or large group, OR read a book with a green cover OR with a half moon on the cover.

 

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text 2018-11-20 15:31
Mawlid - Characters as Messengers

 

In my view, at least, Samwise Gamgee is the ultimate book character messenger. He is among the most quotable characters (of a lot of quotable characters) in the Lord of the Rings.

 

"It's like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger they were. And sometimes you didn't want to know the end… because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened? But in the end, it’s only a passing thing… this shadow. Even darkness must pass.” 

 

He was endlessly loyal, a characteristic that is not sufficiently prized in this time of selfishness as virtue. 

 

“His love for Frodo rose above all other thoughts, and forgetting his peril he cried aloud: 'I'm coming Mr. Frodo!” 

 

He didn't shrink from doing hard things, and he didn't do them for the adulation at the end (although he wasn't entirely averse to being known as "Samwise the Brave"). He is the ultimate expression of perseverance.

 

“I don't know how to say it, but after last night I feel different. I seem to see ahead, in a kind of way. I know we are going to take a very long road, into darkness; but I know I can't turn back. It isn't right to see Elves now, nor dragons, nor mountains, that I want - I don't rightly know what I want: but I have something to do before the end, and it lies ahead, not in the Shire. I must see it through, sir, if you understand me.” 

 

He also loved little things - growing plants, children, and all of the best things about The Shire. He had integrity. He was a hero in the smallest of ways, which makes him the greatest of hobbits.

 

“But Sam turned to Bywater, and so came back up the Hill, as day was ending once more. And he went on, and there was yellow light, and fire within; and the evening meal was ready, and he was expected. And Rose drew him in, and set him in his chair, and put little Elanor upon his lap.
He drew a deep breath. ‘Well, I’m back,’ he said” 

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review 2018-11-20 13:28
24 Festive Tasks: Door 18 - Winter Solstice / Yuletide, Book
The Thirteenth Tale - Diane Setterfield
The Thirteenth Tale - Juliet Stevenson,Diane Setterfield

Somewhat too self-involved for my taste, though in a first novel dealing with identity and the autobiographies we create for ourselves that probably shouldn't have come as a total surprise ... and I'll grant Setterfield that it doesn't exactly have "first novel" written right across its forehead.  The story's central underpinning is one of my absolute no-go tropes, however

(a secret baby)

(spoiler show)

-- and I'm sorry, but the days when I would have found the two (!) generations of Angelfield / March children's upbringing and childhood, or the household as such for that matter, anything even approaching romantic, wild or desirable are long gone. 

 

Far and away the best scene is the one summed up in isanythingopen's 70% mark status update -- a doctor's prescription of Sherlock Holmes as a cure for a cold and for getting overly romantically caught up in an identification with 19th century women's literature.  (Writer, heed thy own words, I'm bound to add.)

 

3 1/2 stars because I'm feeling generous and the writing actually is quite atmospheric whenever it isn't trying too hard.

 

The framework narrative mostly takes place in December, so I'm counting this book towards the Winter Solstice / Yuletide square of 24 Festive Tasks.

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text 2018-11-20 12:13
24 Festive Tasks: Second Week Stats

Admittedly a bit late (work and kitty adoption got in the way), but since we've got a busy schedule for the rest of this week with a total of four doors to be opened -- the first one of which is today's for Mawlid -- I at least wanted to get the 2d week stats out before everyone gets busy on this week's tasks and books.

 

And just as a "by the way" ... as of the end of last week, the sum total of all points accrued was just short of 250 -- which is almost half the total number of points accrued last year in the entire two-month game!  Woohoo!  How cool is that?? 

 

Keep 'em coming ... and please remember to report your progress in the bingo group!

 

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text 2018-11-20 11:00
24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 - Mawlid

<!--row 1-->

Guy Fawks Night

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veteran's and armistace day

Diwali

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dio de los meurtos
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International Day of Tolerance

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Melbourne Cup Day
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Mawlid

 

Mawlid or Mawlid al-Nabi al-Sharif is the observance of the birthday of Islamic prophet Muhammad, commemorated in Rabi' al-awwal, the third month in the Islamic calendar. The 12th or 17th day of Rabi' al-awwal is the accepted date among most of the Sunni scholars, while Shi'a scholars regard the 17th day of Rabi' al-awwal as the accepted date. In 2018, these dates correspond with November 20 and 25 of the Gregorian Calendar.

 

The history of this celebration goes back to the early days of Islam, when some of the Tabi‘un (second generation of Muhammad's followers) began to hold sessions in which poetry and songs composed to honour Muhammad were recited and sung to the crowds. The Ottomans declared it an official holiday in 1588, known as Mevlid Kandil. The term Mawlid is also used in some parts of the world, such as Egypt, as a generic term for the birthday celebrations of other historical religious figures such as Sufi saints. Today, most denominations of Islam approve of the commemoration of Muhammad's birthday; some however, including Wahhabism / Salafism and Deobandism disapprove its commemoration, considering it an unnecessary religious innovation. The Mawlid observance is generally approved of across the four Sunni schools of law and by mainstream Islamic scholarship, and Mawlid is recognized as a national holiday in most of the Muslim-majority countries of the world (except Saudi Arabia and Qatar, which are officially Wahhabi / Salafi). Often organized by the Sufi orders, Mawlid is celebrated in a carnival manner, with large street processions and homes or mosques being decorated. Charity and food are distributed, and stories about the life of Muhammad are narrated, while children recite poetry. Scholars and poets celebrate by reciting Qaṣīda al-Burda Sharif, a famous ode of praise for Muhammad composed by the eminent 13th-century Egyptian Sufi mystic Imam al-Busiri. Sometimes considered an expression of the Sufi concept of the pre-existence of Muhammad, the main significance of these festivities is the expression of love for Muhammad.

 

Tasks and Book

Mawlid

Task 1:  Make two “prophesies” you think will come to fruition in 2019 in your personal or reading life.

 

Task 2: The Five Pillars of Islam include almsgiving and the pilgrimage to Mekka. Tell us: Have you ever donated books or rescued them from (horror of horrors) being trashed? Alternatively: Is there a book-related place that is a place of pilgrimage to you?

 

Task 3: Prophets are messengers. Tell us: Which book characters are your favorite messengers (no matter whether humans, angels, (demi)gods, etc.)?

 

Task 4: Muhammad was a merchant before becoming a religious leader. List 5 books on your shelves in which a key character makes / undergoes a radical career change.

 

Book:  If you can find a copy, read Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet.  Or read any book about a leader of a movement, nation, religion or large group, OR read a book with a green cover OR with a half moon on the cover.

 

 

(Click "Read More" for the previous days' tasks and books.)

 

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