logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: 2star-ok
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-11-21 18:23
Seeker by Arwen Elys Dayton
Seeker - Arwen Elys Dayton

Full review on my blog.

I was in the mood for fantasy. I read this book’s synopsis and it seemed like one of those fantasy quest stories. The cover also made it look that way. It’s not the best cover in the world but I can imagine a fantastic story from the symbols and images on it.

When I added this one on my Goodreads account, I saw the reviews and the outlook didn’t look good. Regardless I decided to give it a try.

Seeker is the story of Quin, John and Shinobu, three teens in Scotland who are training to be “Seekers”. They’ve worked hard and have dreamt all their lives for the day they finally “graduate” their training and join the Seekers. John is not allowed to take his oath as Seeker, only Quin and Shinobu make it. It is after they take the oath as Seekers that they discover the dark secrets that come with the “job”. Quin is not happy about this and feels she needs to make things right. This leads her to a series of events that put her life at risk, take her to Hong Kong and to a parallel world that makes this story a wild ride.

I had several problems with this book. I'll list them here, I explain more on the full review on my blog.

1. Seeker is an easy and hard read at the same time.

2. The world building is not great. First you think you are in the Scottish farmlands, you feel like in a medieval setting but suddenly sci fi cars appear, and then the fantasy stuff happens, and then you are in Hong Kong but then you go through some sort of portals that take you to dark worlds.

3. My other problem is that you never know what a Seeker really is.

4. There is a teenage love triangle in the midst of all this madness, but I couldn’t really care much about the love story.

I finished reading this because I don’t like to have DNFs. I don’t plan to read any sequels of this. I see why there are so many bad reviews. Seeker is not your average alternate world’s story. I gave it two stars because I was feeling generous.

There’s nothing wrong about adults reading YA, but having read this I can say that this is a book that can’t cross the border into adult’s bookshelves. I really don’t know who I could recommend this book to. I’m going to go with: If you’re looking for a fast paced fantasy YA story that keeps you figuring out what and why from start to finish, this is the story for you.

 

 

 

BUY ON AMAZON US | BUY ON AMAZON UK

 

DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
I received an Electronic copy of this book but was not financially compensated in any way nor obliged to review. The opinions expressed are my own and are based on my personal experience while reading it. This post contains affiliate links
Source: bloggeretterized.wordpress.com/2015/11/21/read-reviewed-73-seeker-by-arwen-elys-dayton
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-09-12 18:03
Keep the Ends Loose by Molly Campbell
Keep the Ends Loose - Molly D. Campbell

The pretty cover and the blurb give you an idea of a lovely and sentimental coming of age story about a girl helping her aunt. Who can resist a story like that? Not me. I had to check it out.

Keeping the Ends Loose is the story of Mandy, a 15-year-old girl in junior high, a bookworm who would prefer life in another era; a girl with big dreams of leaving her town and moving to New York or Toronto to have a career. She is also a girl who fears sex and has no interest and time for sexting, nude selfies, etc. Yes, this is our main character.

Mandy lives with her parents, her brother. Other important characters in her life are her “statuesque, tall, willowy and graceful” Aunt Iris and her best friend Barley (yes, that’s her name). Mandy’s world was OK until one day her mom talks to her about her Aunt Iris being in love and unable to marry her new love interest because she hasn’t divorced the guy she married back when she was in college, a man who just disappeared into thin air. Her mother tells her, that they have to do something to find Frank, so Iris can divorce him and move on with her life.

And so we read about Mandy and what she does to fulfill this “noble” cause in favor of her beloved Aunt Iris. What Mandy doesn’t know, is that this quest will lead her to uncover hidden secrets in her mother’s life that affect her once happy family and turn her world into a total dysfunctional crazy one.

The premise of the story is a good one. This book had everything to be one of those powerful lesson filled books. But sadly it was not executed in a good way. It had its good moments, it had some humor, but it also lacked power, and felt contradictory and annoying at times. I’m sorry to say this was not irresistible, I didn’t recognize or relate to any of the characters and this was not an unforgettable life-changing story. This was only an OK read, nothing more.

My beef problem with the book is (read the full review on my blog for more about this):

1.- The main character. The target audience for this book will have a hard time relating to the main character, which in turn won’t motivate them to engage in the story.

2.- I signed up for a story about a girl helping her aunt; instead I got a story about an irrational, immature mother, who made huge mistakes in her youth and chose an inappropriate way to reveal them and clean her conscience. This woman was not fit to be a mom.

3.- There's a double standard in terms of the messages the author wants to communicate to teens:
--> Teens should stay away from sex yet they can get wasted when they can't deal with life.
--> It’s not OK for kids to judge their parents (or anyone) for their mistakes but they can think of them as stupid.
--> Even though it's OK to fear sex, you should do it anyway because you can't go to college all virginal and unwordly.

(read the full review on my blog for more about this)

Despite all of this, I kept reading because the conflict had a promising solution. I hoped the book would leave me with an uplifting message. But it only left me feeling like it was too long of a story for a: Shit Crap Life happens, move on lesson.

Come on! We need to give teens some hope. I’m not saying we should sugar coat their lives and minds with lies, but one of the reasons teens read books is to find stories that help them cope with their woes. Why can’t we show them there’s a light at the end of every tunnel? Teens already know they must go on. We need to give them examples of how they can go on.

I can’t see a teen feeling uplifted or inspired by this story. This book will not leave teens with a sense of closure but with their ends loose.

Needless to say, I don’t see a movie coming out of this YA book. I don’t know who I could recommend this book to. I went ahead and read five 5-star reviews of this book on Goodreads to see who could like this book. They were very succinct reviews from what teenagers would call “old people”. It’s ironic that a book whose target audience is the young adult audience is loved by full grown adults. These reviews made me feel like these people read a completely different book from the one I read.

So based on this and on my honest experience reading the book, I don’t recommend this book for young adults. I would recommend it to adults, as a book to learn what crappy parenting is; in hopes that they don’t even dare to imitate the bad parenting done by the “adults” in this book.

 

Buy on Amazon US

Buy on Amazon UK

 

 

 

DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
I received an Electronic copy of this book but was not financially compensated in any way nor obliged to review. The opinions expressed are my own and are based on my personal experience while reading it. This post contains affiliate links

 

 

Source: bloggeretterized.wordpress.com/2015/09/12/read-reviewed-66-keep-the-ends-loose-by-molly-campbell
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-08-15 18:16
Winter at the Door by Sarah Graves
Winter at the Door: A Novel (Lizzie Snow) - Sarah Graves

Winter at the Door by Sarah Graves is the first book I’ve read by this American author. It is also the first book in her Lizzie Snow series featuring a big city female cop. I was attracted to read this book because of the title, the cover and the blurb. More about this on the full review on my blog.

The premise sounded good. Lizzie Snow, a homicide detective, moves to Bearkill, Maine where she will be given the mission of solving a series of suspicious suicides of local cops, that may or may not be murders. What the people of Bearkill don’t know is that she has ulterior motives for moving there: she’s on a personal mission to find her long lost niece.

Sadly as much as I had high hopes for this female fronted story, it ended up not measuring to my expectations. Don’t get me wrong, it was not a bad book, but it lacked that oomph to make it one of those unputdownable and unforgettable stories. It was an OK read, nothing else.

It started OK. The first few chapters are a good intro so you can get to know the weird people of Bearkill. I kept reading and after the first quarter of the story there were still no thrills, only a bunch of weird characters whose relationship to the murders was still a mystery to me.

Half-way through, just when I thought the story couldn’t lack more spice it twisted into things that didn’t make sense. I kept hoping to be thrilled but at that point I wasn’t thrilled at all, just confused. And as the story progressed, I wasn’t fond of the sudden story-line changes. Once I was getting the hang of a story-line it changed into another one.

I kept waiting for the thrills, suspense and mystery of and I quote: “a showdown that could leave the deep, driven snow stained blood red”, but that never happened. It turned out to be a predictable story in the end. And that last chapter felt like a terribly long afterword.

I was glad when I finally ended reading this book. Like I said in the beginning, Winter at the Door is not a bad book. In fact there are some rave reviews about it out there. It just didn’t do it for me. But feel free to check it out as well as the second installment in the Lizzie Snow series which will come out in 2016.

 

Buy on Amazon US

Buy on Amazon UK

 

 

 

DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
I received an Electronic copy of this book but was not financially compensated in any way nor obliged to review. The opinions expressed are my own and are based on my personal experience while reading it. This post contains affiliate links
Source: bloggeretterized.wordpress.com/2015/08/15/read-reviewed-62-winter-at-the-door-by-sarah-graves
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-07-18 21:55
The Butterfly and the Violin by Kristy Cambron
The Butterfly and the Violin (Hidden Masterpiece, #1) - Kristy Cambron

Full review on my blog.

 

I am a big fan of historical fiction. I utterly enjoy reading stories that take you back in time to real places and historical events. There’s something magical about romancing past lives. It feels like all the suffering and horrors of the past can be rectified or somehow honored with historical fiction stories. Sadly as a reader of this genre, I am often deceived by publishers who in an effort of trying to get religious messages out there, abuse historical fiction readers by not mentioning the fact that the stories are religious fiction.

When I saw the title and cover of this book I knew I had to read it. But you know what they say, never judge a book by its cover.

The Butterfly and the Violin is the story of Sera James and Adele Von Bron. Sera’s story takes place in our present time. Adele’s story takes us back in time to Austria in the 1940s.

I was very pleased as I started reading this book. The first 7 chapters were entertaining. I liked the parallel stories. Sera and Adele were two characters with whom I could easily relate to. They felt real and their stories felt credible. When I reached the Auschwitz part I knew I was in for an emotional ride.

Forty percent into the book was when my first red flag appeared. I was misled by not knowing this was Christian fiction. But the religious statements at this point were small and subtle so I let them pass.

But sadly as charming as William was with Sera and as compelling as Adele’s time in Auschwitz was, the love stories ended up being too PREDICTABLE for my taste. Yes, the capital letters are intended. The historical facts around them were promising and captivating. Anything you read about the Holocaust has emotional power. The author had a story that had romantic tear-jerking potential but it lacked that dramatic effect and left me waiting for it to come. And the final turn off for me was that from approximately page 230 until the end, it got really religious which was something I hadn’t signed up for; nothing in the blurb of this book said religious fiction.

In the end I felt like the author focused too much on Sera and used Adele as a historical filler. It should’ve been the other way around. Adele’s story was much more interesting and would’ve liked this book better if it had been only about Adele. I wanted to know more about Adele in the end, but the author focused so much on pouring the religious messages that Adele’s ending felt rushed and wasted.

With that said, this book is an OK read, 2 stars it gets, nothing more. If you’re into holocaust fiction this is not the book for you. There are better options out there. If you are looking for religious fiction, then this might be the book for you. Can’t say if it’s good religious fiction or bad though, that would be for fans of this genre to say.

 

Buy on Amazon US

Buy on Amazon UK

 

 

 

DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
I received an Electronic copy of this book but was not financially compensated in any way nor obliged to review. The opinions expressed are my own and are based on my personal experience while reading it. This post contains affiliate links
Source: bloggeretterized.wordpress.com/2015/07/18/read-reviewed-58-the-butterfly-and-the-violin-by-kristy-cambron
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-06-21 19:45
The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine
By Genevieve Valentine The Girls at the Kingfisher Club: A Novel - Genevieve Valentine

The Girls at the Kingfishers Club is the retelling of the Twelve Dancing Princesses fairy tale, set in Manhattan during the Jazz Age.

The year 1927, there were 12 girls, the Halmilton sisters, confined by their father at their Manhattan townhouse. This led them to sneak out of their house when the sun went down to dance the night away at fabulous jazz clubs. The sisters enjoy their nocturnal ventures, but for the sake of keeping their identity safe they never give their real name; hence everyone at the dancing scene calls them “princesses”.

Mr. Halmilton has heard some rumors that the daughters of storied families were

“lured in numbers, by immodest music and the demon drink, like princesses into that dark underground which leaves no innocent unsullied”.

This made him realize that his daughters are reaching a certain age, so he decides to arrange lunches/interviews at their home with possible suitors for each of their daughters.

This doesn’t keep the girls from their nightly dancing adventures, until one day, they are caught in a raid that separates them. They are forced to run for their lives and to live for the first time apart from each other and away from home. Will they be able to survive on their own? Will they find true love, rejoin as a family and live happily ever after? That’s for you to find out. ;)

The setting is marvelous. I felt transported to the 1920s. I could picture the underground clubs, listen to the jazzy tunes and imagine the outfits and hairdos in my mind. The lovely feminine woman in the cover was also a great aid for my imagination.

The story is OK. It’s not a bad book. I had trouble with these:
- There were too many characters and I couldn’t completely bond with them.
- The sisters don’t get the same exposure in the story.
- I also felt like there where loose ends.
- The other thing that didn’t do it for me was the lack of romance. More in depth thoughts about this on the full review on my blog.

The Girls at the Kingfishers Club is a book I recommend as transitional read, a short quick story in between long and heavy books. If you like stories about sisterhood this is the book for you. If you like to listen to 1920s jazz this is the book for you. If you’re of age, this story is the perfect companion for your gin on a summer afternoon. If you’re a fan of fairy tales retold, this is the book for you. It takes you away back to a place and time that is more believable than the original fairy tale.

 

Buy on Amazon US

Buy on Amazon UK

 

DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
I received an Electronic copy of this book but was not financially compensated in any way nor obliged to review. The opinions expressed are my own and are based on my personal experience while reading it. This post contains affiliate links.
Source: bloggeretterized.wordpress.com/2015/06/21/read-reviewed-54-the-girls-at-the-kingfisher-club-by-genevieve-valentine
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?