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review 2017-08-20 00:46
Review: Clean Room Vol 3
Clean Room Vol. 3: Waiting for the Stars to Fall - Gail Simone,Jon Davis-Hunt

This series continues to kick ass and cost me sleep. Love the writing, love the art. I don't want to give anything away for those who haven't tried. If you're up for a violent, creepy, weird ride full of awesome female characters, try this series out!

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review 2017-08-20 00:21
Poison Ivy!
Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #3 - Matthew Manning,Jon Sommariva

I do miss her relationship with Harley, which was, true, more explicit in the comics than the TV show.   (This was on sale on Comixology recently, under their all-age sale, and I don't regret the buck I spent on each issue.   Gotta admit: I'm more excited about a possible Inhumans sale for the IMAX movie and later the TV show premiere at the end of September.)

 

Anyway, I love what they did with Poison Ivy and how everyone worked together to send her back to Arkham.   

 

Still not crazy about the art, and still not finding this the very best crossover, or even media tie-in, that IDW has produced.   (The Ghostbusters/TMNT and Edward Scissorhands ones were WAY better.)

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review 2017-08-19 18:49
Adeline (Lady Archer's Creed) by Christina McKnight
Adeline (Lady Archer's Creed Book 3) - Christina McKnight,Amanda Mariel

 

An impressive slight of hand. She flipped the script on me. Adeline pays homage to a classic tale while reversing the roles of the main characters. The hero has a beautiful soul trapped inside of a damaged shell, while the heroine is beautiful on the outside and scarred by ugliness within. Adeline marks the first character of Ms. McKnight's that I did not like at first sight. She was rude, mean spirited and judgmental. Yet to love her is to understand her and through the eyes of a broken man and the heart of a gifted writer, readers are given that chance. Adeline proved that even the ugliest of hearts can change. No matter how many times I hear those words, it never tarnishes the value of the lesson.

 
 

 

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review 2017-08-18 21:38
WILDFIRE BY: ILONA ANDREWS
Wildfire - Ilona Andrews
fangirling
 
 
Ilona Andrews books are pure magic! Everything they come out with only makes me want MORE. And the Hidden Legacy series is no exception. Here is yet another vast urban fantasy world that I could live in forever and never tire of.
 
 
Not only does the world have me completely enamored, but the characters are so fabulous too! Obviously I am over the moon for Nevada and Mad Rogan, they are top ships undisputedly. But I am also completely in love with the whole Baylor family. The way they always have each other's backs, the way the tease each other, and that's not even touching on the fact that they each have really interesting magical talents that I feel like we only just touched on. If I had one wish right now it would be to get more books from each of the Baylor family members! I NEED MORE!
 
 
for the love of
 
 
PLEASE PUBLISH MORE HIDDEN LEGACY BOOKS! 
 
 
give it to me
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review 2017-08-18 20:57
The Cost of Sugar by Cynthia McLeod
The cost of sugar - Cynthia Mc Leod

This is a lively, melodramatic work of historical fiction set in mid-18th century Suriname. At that time, the small nation on the northern coast of South America was a Dutch colony consisting of sugar and coffee plantations carved out of the jungle, many of them run by Jewish owners who arrived in Suriname via Portugal and Brazil, and all of them worked by slaves. Unlike in North America, however, proximity to the jungle meant that slaves often escaped to form their own communities, which were in constant conflict with the colonial government.

The story spans 14 years and has a large cast for under 300 pages, but its protagonists are stepsisters Elza and Sarith, both daughters of Jewish plantation owners. The two are best friends as girls, but soon find themselves opposed, primarily because Elza is a sweet young woman who treats the slaves well while Sarith is short-sighted and willing to ruin the lives of everyone around her in order to get her way. Yes, it’s that kind of book. The book focuses on Elza early on, then shifts its attention later in the story to Sarith, Sarith’s slave Mini-mini, and a young mercenary named Jan.

Which is to say that there’s no single plotline, and characters come and go rather oddly (I expected Alex to become more important than he did, and Amimba, as the first character we meet, to have something more than a walk-on role). But as a story about a place and a society, rather than any single protagonist, it flows well. The plot moves quickly and stays interesting, the translation is fluid, and the characters – if not particularly complex – are sympathetic, except when not intended to be. It presents a detailed picture of a historical era that doesn’t feel overly influenced by modern views, though it can be a little ham-fisted. The author has clearly done her share of research on Surinamese history and is able to bring her cultural knowledge to the pages.

Interestingly, most of the novel was originally written in Dutch, but slaves at the time were forbidden from learning Dutch, so conversed among themselves and with whites in Sranan, a creole language related to English as well as other European and African languages. The author originally wrote conversations involving slaves in Sranan, which is evidently still sufficiently widely-spoken in Suriname for the original audience to understand. In the English version, the Sranan dialogue is translated, but you can see the original in the footnotes. Helpful footnotes also explain those words or concepts that will be unfamiliar for the English-speaking reader (there’s a glossary at the end too, but I didn’t need it).

Overall, this is an entertaining work that will likely appeal to those who enjoy popular historical fiction. It’s not great literature but doesn’t try to be. And props to the author for writing a book for a country she was told “doesn’t have a reading tradition” – this book is now apparently beloved in Suriname after all.

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