logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: 30-s-horror
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-08-11 16:18
STOKER'S WILDE WEST by Steven Hopstaken and Melissa Prusi
Stoker's Wilde West - Stephen Hopstaken,Melissa Prusi

STOKER'S WILDE WEST is a follow-up to last year's STOKER'S WILDE. I think this book is even better than the first.

 

Bram Stoker is about to take the theatrical group he manages for Henry Irving to play NYC. He plans to bring his wife Florence and their new son, Noel, along for the ride. Oscar Wilde has recently returned from touring the states and has developed a bit of fame there. When Stoker is asked by Robert Roosevelt to help the Americans in sussing out a nest of vampires, Wilde joins him and we're off for a Wilde ride!

 

Like Dracula, this book is in epistolary form, which I love. Culled from the characters' journals, reports to the White Worm Society, (a group which formed to investigate the occult, among other things), and diary entries, we are treated to different viewpoints of several events. These are really what makes the book, because these entries are often hilarious as Stoker and Wilde do not really care for each other.

 

All kinds of famous people from that time in history show up or are otherwise mentioned. Personalities such as Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, the Roosevelt family, and Arthur Conan Doyle, to name just a few. All of which contribute to make this book as funny and interesting as it is.

 

The historical fiction, a respect for the original works of these authors, and a great sense of humor all combine with some amazing storytelling in this fun wild west story. Highly recommended!

 

Available today, here: STOKER'S WILDE WEST

 

*Thank you to NetGalley and Flame Tree Press for the ARC of this book in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it!*

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2020-08-07 13:30
#FridayReads 8.7.20

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review SPOILER ALERT! 2020-08-07 08:33
Bird Box by Josh Malerman
Bird Box - Josh Malerman

TITLE:  Bird Box

AUTHOR:  Josh Malerman

__________________________

DESCRIPTION:

"Something is out there, something terrifying that must not be seen. One glimpse of it, and a person is driven to deadly violence. No one knows what it is or where it came from.

Five years after it began, a handful of scattered survivors remains, including Malorie and her two young children. Living in an abandoned house near the river, she has dreamed of fleeing to a place where they might be safe. Now that the boy and girl are four, it's time to go, but the journey ahead will be terrifying: twenty miles downriver in a rowboat—blindfolded—with nothing to rely on but her wits and the children's trained ears. One wrong choice and they will die. Something is following them all the while, but is it man, animal, or monster?

Interweaving past and present, Bird Box is a snapshot of a world unraveled that will have you racing to the final page.
"

_____________________________

REVIEW:



****************************SPOILERS!!!!****************************



*************************LOTS OF SPOILERS*****************************



I watched the movie and read the book.  I don't get what the fuss was about.  As a horror novel, it might have gory bits, but it just didn't work for me.  I was neither scared, left in suspense or terrified.   Too slow, no details about the "creatures" (their motivations or what they were, which is completely unsatisfying and incredibly annoying), limited atmosphere, limited drama (psychological or otherwise) and I simply didn't give a damn about any of the characters (they were bland).  Also, Malerman needs to do some research on child birth, especially if he is going to write about it.  And calling the kids "Boy", "Girl" instead of their names? What if it had been two girls or two boys?  "Boy1", "Boy2"?  "Firstborn", "Secondborn"?  I'm also failing to see 4 year old kids do any of the stuff the kids do in this novel.  Unless my husband's 4-year old nephew is on the bottom end of the physical and mental scale?  The novel basically comes down to "a bunch of people stuck in a house" dynamics, with the usual associated messiness (no need for nebulous monsters if people want to kill each other or themselves - they do this perfectly well on their own).  The "creatures" come across as simply irrelevant - an excuse for people to lock themselves up.   

Interesting concept, flat execution.

PS:  I did not appreciate reading about the poor dog!!

Like Reblog Comment
text 2020-08-05 16:41
The Salisbury Poisoning Brings Back the Horrors of Novichok Attack

 

The three-part arrangement is based on the occasions of March 2018, revisits the horrors when the Wiltshire cathedral city confronted one of the greatest dangers to UK public health in later years.


Sergei Skripal and his girl Yulia were found drooped and frothing at the mouth on a city middle seat, having been harmed with the dangerous nerve specialist Novichok.


The government would afterward conclude it was a death endeavor by two operators of Russian insights benefit the GRU. It's an uncommon story, which Salisbury is still recouping from. But the performance isn't a few kind of James Bond-style spy thriller.


The Skripals are as it were seen briefly at the starting of the primary scene, and the Russian suspects are not appeared at all. Instep, it centers on the reaction of the neighborhood community and wellbeing authorities.


"We were drawn to the stories of the people who had to clean up this mess, rather than the people who made it," says Declan Lawn, who co-wrote the script with Adam Patterson.


"It's about ordinary people who have to pick up the pieces. We thought that's where the drama was, where the emotion was. We didn't want to do the obvious thing, which would have probably been an espionage drama.


"But I hope that what we've done is show that there are people out there who take a bullet for us, they are a hidden network of people who keep this society together."


At the middle of the The Salisbury Poisonings is Tracy Daszkiewicz (played by Anne-Marie Duff), the director of public health for Wiltshire. She had been named just three months before the Skripals were harmed, but had worked for Wiltshire Committee for more than a decade.


You can easily be able to watch BBC iPlayer in USA to stream the series, for more information on the real incident you can check out this news.


In reality, Daszkiewicz played an indispensably part of the reaction to the harming, but dodged media introduction - in portion to not deceive the belief of nearby residents.


Together with the police, she utilized CCTV to work fastidiously to discover out who the Skripals might have come into contact with on the day they were harmed, and took a cautious approach to securing the open.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-08-03 18:50
THE LIVING DEAD by George Romero and Daniel Kraus
The Living Dead - George Romero,Daniel Kraus

in this truly epic novel, we follow a variety of different characters as they deal with this new version of zombies. What a trip!

 

From a young, black woman in a trailer park to a Japanese officer on an American navy boat; from a woman who inputs medical information into a national database, to a Spanish medical examiner and his assistant, Charlene; (hey, that's my name!), we travel all across the nation over the span of 15 years or so. What's different about these zombies? Why isn't this the same old zombie story, that Romero himself invented? You'll have to read this to find out!

 

What made this different for me, (and Romero did this in his films too,) was the focus on consumption and the American need to have everything, to have the best, to be better than the next. There was also a bit of climate change commentary in here. In fact, there was a good amount of philosophy within these pages. Does Mother Nature reach out to protect herself when she's used and abused? Does the world, or our environment, do the same? Does humanity need a reset button at times, to get things back to an even keel? Has this happened in the past? Will it happen the future? All valid questions to be sure.

 

Combine all these philosophical issues with a cast of characters that is truly memorable and you have yourself the nearly perfect novel that is THE LIVING DEAD. I found myself thinking about THE STAND quite a bit-there are some similarities: a large cast of characters to start, all in different places and situations across the United States. Of course the cast eventually come together and over the course of more than a decade we see how they've changed or not, as the case may be.

 

Another thing these books have in common is that they both made this black heart cry. (Acocella will always have a place in my heart.) And never again will I hear about the La Brea Tar Pits and not shed a tear. The only issue I had with this novel is that it is so long. Not that that's a bad thing, but I think a tiny bit could have been cut without damaging the story as a whole. For that I deducted half a star.

 

So, let's wrap up here! A novel of epic proportions? Check! A novel filled with characters that feel real and that the reader cares for? Check! Major differences in these zombies from the zombies populating so much of American culture? BIG check! A novel in which you can immerse yourself until you emerge, battered, but stronger for it? Check! I really loved this novel if you couldn't tell by now and I give it my highest recommendation!

 

Available everywhere tomorrow, or you can pre-order here: THE LIVING DEAD

 

*Thank you to TOR for the paperback in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it!*

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?