Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: After-the-Apocalypse
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-05 03:03
Suspend your disbelief for this wild novel about a girl with healing powers who kickstarts the apocalypse; also takes on topics like suicide and bullying
The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza - Shaun David Hutchinson

I wanted to read this crazy book from the moment I read the synopsis, and a kind soul surprised me with a pre-order of it.
It’s the sort of book that you’ll either be stoked, like me, when you get your hands on it, or one that you will steer clear of because it’s way too outlandish. And that’s because if you fully intend to immerse yourself in a book where a young girl called Elena Mendoza exists because she is the product of a virgin birth (parthenogenesis), it means suspending your disbelief (a lot), but not reading if you are prone to seeing that very premise alone as blasphemous.

The concept of the book becomes even more interesting after Elena realizes she has the gift of healing people, but she discovers this only after her crush, Freddie, is shot outside the Starbucks she works at. Big problem with this though: innocent people are ‘raptured’ every time Elena heals someone, and the number grows the longer she does it, and she has inanimate objects telling her she must do these healings. Not to mention that this all kicked off the apocalypse.
There’s so much else in here other than this wild story though, that will have the reader thinking all the way through. Having the main character as a bisexual girl of Cuban descent (kudos to Hutchinson) struggling with the ‘voices’, dealing with bullies, and her feelings toward her crush (who honestly isn’t very nice to her), there are a whole host of teenage issues even without the impending apocalypse and feeling like an outcast because she’s a product of a virgin birth. There are also lots of other things brought up such as grief, suicide, gun use, and ultimately the fate of the world becomes the final big conversation.

It’s hard not to read this and not have yourself thinking about how Elena is ‘playing God’ and also about how the world might end. So you can read this and think about how silly it is that Elena is hearing a voice coming from the siren on the Starbucks cup, but you can also appreciate that there are some big questions and topics that Hutchinson is tackling within this wonderful, thought-provoking novel. Sometimes you have to tackle the big subjects within these parameters because otherwise they’re even more overwhelming!
My only major issues with the book were with some passages that seemed to drag that made pacing odd, and a little bit of preachiness at the end. Overall though, this is a wonderfully-written, decidedly different and fun YA novel. A unique read!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-01 17:03
The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza
The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza - Shaun David Hutchinson
This was an interesting novel, one that I couldn’t put down once I started it. I needed to know what happened in the end and what was that path that the characters walked on to get there? As the main character was fixated on one central aspect of the equation, I was looking for all the other key components to see how everything else fit together.
Elena has always known that she was a bit special. It began with her virgin birth and continued on when the sirens began talking to her when she was little. One day while working at Starbucks a girl is shot. Luckily Elena is on break and witnesses the shooting. A siren, the mermaid Starbuck logo, summons for Elena to heal the girl. Confused, Elena doesn’t know anything about healing and confronts the siren. The siren explains to Elena how to touch the girl. Apprehensively, Elena lays her hands on the dying girl and Elena feels something within her as the dying girl slowly begins to awaken. Elena speaks to the victim and she explains how the shooter has vanished. Elena has now created a new name for herself, one she cannot explain and one that she is not sure she wants. Each life that she saves, must come with a price and these prices are ones that she has no control over.
This novel fascinated me yet it also made me think about life and the options that we have. Elena had individuals approaching her constantly asking her to heal a sick loved one and Elena had to consider the price for that one life. It becomes overwhelming at times for her while the sirens are yelling at her to do her part for humanity. I thought the conversation that Freddie and Elena have over an individual’s existence speaks volumes. I felt sorry for Freddie but I am glad that Elena became a part of her life. Not a novel that everyone will enjoy but one that put a spark in me.


Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-19 06:21
Terminal Alliance (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse, #1) by Jim C. Hines
Terminal Alliance (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse) - Jim C. Hines

TITLE:  Terminal Alliance - Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse, #1.


AUTHOR:  Jim C. Hines



From the blurb:

The Krakau came to Earth to invite humanity into a growing alliance of sentient species. However, they happened to arrive after a mutated plague wiped out half the planet, turned the rest into shambling, near-unstoppable animals, and basically destroyed human civilization. You know--your standard apocalypse.

The Krakau's first impulse was to turn around and go home. (After all, it's hard to have diplomatic relations with mindless savages who eat your diplomats.) Their second impulse was to try to fix us. Now, a century later, human beings might not be what they once were, but at least they're no longer trying to eat everyone. Mostly.

Marion "Mops" Adamopoulos is surprisingly bright (for a human). As a Lieutenant on the Earth Mercenary Corps Ship Pufferfish, she's in charge of the Shipboard Hygiene and Sanitation team. When a bioweapon attack wipes out the Krakau command crew and reverts the rest of the humans to their feral state, only Mops and her team are left with their minds intact.

Escaping the attacking aliens--not to mention her shambling crewmates--is only the beginning. Sure, Mops and her team of space janitors and plumbers can clean the ship as well as anyone, but flying the damn thing is another matter.

As they struggle to keep the Pufferfish functioning and find a cure for their crew, they stumble onto a conspiracy that could threaten the entire alliance... a conspiracy born from the truth of what happened on Earth all those years ago.


Terminal Alliance is a fast paced, humorous, science-fiction novel with an original alien cast and world building.  It's not everyday that the janitorial team ends up in the spotlight or saves the galaxy with disinfectant, so this makes for an original book concept too.  The main character is likeable, though the secondary cast are a bit flat (in this book anyway - maybe we learn more about them in following books?).  The book cover is both funny and beautiful!  This book was great fun and I'm looking forward to the next one.

NOTE:  This book is a complete story, but "what happens next" will be covered in another book.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-12 13:11
Nightfall by Isaac Asimov & Robert Silverberg
Nightfall - Isaac Asimov,Robert Silverberg

From the blurb:

"Imagine living on a planet with six suns that never experiences Darkness. Imagine never having seen the Stars. Then, one by one your suns start to set, gradually leading you into Darkness for the first time ever. Image the terror of such a Nightfall.

Scientists on the planet Kalgash discover that an eclipse - an event that occurs only every 2049 years - is imminent, and that a society unfamiliar with Darkness will be plunged into madness and chaos. They realize that their civilization will end, for the people of Kalgash have a proven fear of Darkness, but they are unable to predict the insanity and destruction that will accompany the awesome splendor of Nightfall."

Originally published in 1970, this book has a pulp feel to it.  This story explores the events before, during and after a total eclipse and resulting complete darkness on a planet with six suns and perpetual light.  The doomsday/apocalypse concept is interesting but the execution falls a bit flat - the characters are a bit two dimensional and some events and their timing are just too convenient.  However, the book is still enjoyable and would make a nice addition to the shelf of an apocalypse fan.


Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-22 07:27
Dust by Charles Pellegrino
Dust - Charles Pellegrino

From the blurb:

 "In an idyllic Long Island community, paleobiologist Richard Sinclair is one of the first to suspect that the environment has begun to wage bloody, terrifying war on humanity. What initially appear to be random, unrelated events are actually violent eruptions in a worldwide biological chain reaction. Along with a brave group of survivors, Sinclair must learn to understand the catastrophe while it roils around them, slowly crumbling a panicked world and threatening apocalypse. The survival of humankind depends on finding an answer immediately--or else they will face the final, tragic destiny of their species. "


This book may not be the best writing on the planet, but it does take a fairly accurate look at what could happen should all the insects disappear - the collapse of ecosystems, food crops, the economy, society and ultimately civilization.  The book is rather interesting, scary and thought provoking.  The author doesn't provide all the answers and the reader needs to pay attention.  It does not have zombies (!!) despite the prions.  It does have some unusual voracious critters. Most of the science discussed in this book is accurate, which is what makes this book so fascinating (to me anyway). 




More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?