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review 2016-12-18 05:50
Agnes Grey, Anne Bronte
Agnes Grey - Anne Brontë

This is Anne's first novel and it's a lesser work than the subsequent Tenant of Wildfell Hall but it shows some similarities; it is most powerful when tackling social issues of autobiographical concern to the author; the protagonist is a bit self-righteous; it never suffers the dullness that afflicts the lesser parts of Jane Eyre; it never tilts over into the almost insane hysterical passion of Wuthering Heights.

 

It seems fairly obvious that Anne wanted to tackle the plight of poorly treated governesses and bolted a very conventional and largely uninspired romance on the end in order to make it a novel. This romance section in itself serves more to act as a warning about the potential fate of people who marry merely for money or social status than to provide any satisfying against-the-odds meeting of soul-mates; the outcome is dictated by convenient chance. I note that as with other Bronte novels, the protagonist wishes to be appreciated for her moral, educational and intellectual capacities and achievements. This was clearly what was valued by the Brontes and what they wanted to be esteemed for having.

 

I found the book never tedious, being short in length and brisk enough, unlike Jane Eyre which bogs down frequently, but the early parts, loaded with the protagonist's early experiences away from home before romance enters the picture are surprisingly the most memorable. It would seem governesses were frequently treated badly by both parents and pupils and, being isolated from their previous "support network" as well as usually young and inexperienced, they often suffered greatly. It is obvious that Anne is speaking from experience in these passages and they act as a precursor to the later and greater similarly autobiographically informed sections of Tenant of Wildfell Hall, which remains by far the stand-out Bronte novel I've read.

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text 2016-12-16 01:36
Reading progress update: I've read 20 out of 248 pages.
Agnes Grey - Anne Brontë

I'm having a bit of Century Shock, this book being circa 150 years older than the previous one I read...

 

Master Tom seems to be an extremely unpleasant character!

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text 2016-12-15 12:10
Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 248 pages.
Agnes Grey - Anne Brontë

When I decided it was overdue time to give Austen and the Brontes a fair chance as an adult, I thought the thing to do would be to buy one book by each of them; this is the last of them, following Pride and Prejudice, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and Jane Eyre.

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text 2016-11-14 09:41
Agnes Grey - Anne Bronte

W literaturze pedagogicznej bardzo często możemy natknąć się na definicję nauczyciela z powołania. Tak więc teoretycznie nauczyciel to zawód i zarazem powołanie, to zdolności wrodzone i wyuczone, to odpowiedni zbiór cech osobowości temperamentu, to umiejętność poświęcania się dla dobra osób, to miłość do dzieci. Praca w zawodzie nauczyciela powinna przynosić nauczycielowi przyjemność i satysfakcję, bez względu na różne okoliczności i sytuacje, na przykład, bez względu na stan materialny*.

 

A jak powyższa kwestia wygląda w praktyce? Ile z teorii zamieszczonej w rozmaitego rodzaju publikacjach posiada swoje odzwierciedlenie w klasach szkolnych? Obawiam się, że niewiele. Ktoś powie, że czasy się zmieniają, a wraz z nimi także priorytety nauczyciela. I w pewnym sensie będzie miał rację. Być może moja wizja współczesnego nauczyciela przedstawia się zbyt pesymistycznie, ale tak sobie myślę, że obecnie tych prawdziwych nauczycieli z powołania jest już niewielu. W swojej pracy większość z nich skupia się jedynie na tym, co musi i czego wymaga od nich program nauczania, choć i ten nie zawsze realizowany jest do końca.

 

 

 

Przeczytaj całość

 

 

 

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text 2016-09-29 17:05
Bookhaul #32

In my last bookhaul I told you guys that I was planning on going to a huge booksale thing, so here's my bookhaul! I would too many books in my opinion, but I really want to read them all and I paid less than 20 euros in total for like 8 books, so yay! I also ordered two books and they came in the mail today, so I thought it would be the perfect time to finally show them. 

As you can see, all above are classics. Those are the ones I bought for less than 20 euros. I'm so excited to read all of them (I've already read Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, but I wanted to get his entire collection) and some of them are on the Rory Gilmore list as well. Which one of these are you most looking forward to seeing a review?

I've been wanting to collect (almost) every book of both of these authors so I thought it was about time to get them. The only book I now need to get of Adichie is We Should All Be Feminists (but I already watched her speech on TedTalks so not sure if it's worth to buy it). I also bought This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab. First I wanted to wait until this entire series is out, but because I want to get all her books in hardcover I decided to buy them once in a while. My plan is to buy A Darker Shade of Magic and the second book in that series too, because the third and final book in that trilogy will be coming out in February. I also cannot wait to read more by these authors!

 

What is your latest book purchase?

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