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Search tags: Amy-Krouse-Rosenthal
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review 2017-06-02 19:33
Slice of life is fun to say
Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life - Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Not very long ago, I saw an article that had gone viral about a woman who knew that she was going to die and she wanted to make sure that her husband found someone (it was like a dating profile but way better). The author was one that somehow hadn't made it onto my radar before this time and I couldn't help feeling thankful that I had found her even though it was under very tragic circumstances. You might have guessed who I was talking about at this point but just in case it was Amy Krouse Rosenthal and the article I'm talking about can be found here. Ten days after the article was published she passed away. It turns out that not only was she a prolific writer of children's books but she also wrote for adults. I thought I'd start with one of her well-known adult nonfiction pieces called Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life. It's somewhere between a memoir which depicts a slice of Rosenthal's life and a quirky encyclopedia. It's one of the most unique books that I've ever read and after doing some research into the author that seems to adequately describe her. She took the events and circumstances of the year in which she wrote the book to record alphabetically (as one would do in an encyclopedia) different aspects of herself (and the world around her somewhat). For example, under the letter J you would find information about her husband, Jason, with a "See Also Husband" at the end of the entry. It was a lot of fun to dip in and out of it and learn about this totally singular individual. It's a shame that I'm late to the game discovering Amy's work but I am certainly glad that I've found her now. 9/10

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-04-08 04:47
Duck! Rabbit! - Amy Krouse Rosenthal,Tom Lichtenheld

This book will have you turning the book all kinds of ways to see if you think the main character is a duck or a rabbit. The reader may turn it one way and it could be a duck and another way it can be a rabbit. I can use this book in my classroom to do a lesson on compare and contrast. I can also use it to see my students visual perspectives are of the main character. 

RL: AD2OL

LS:Lexile

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review 2017-04-05 15:54
Duck! Rabbit!
Duck! Rabbit! - Amy Krouse Rosenthal,Tom Lichtenheld

This book would be good for looking at the perception of situations or for looking at the creative minds of others. After we read the book, I would give them a piece of paper and they will draw a duck or a rabbit and we will vote on which animal we thought it was. Perception in a child's eye is important because they see things that we don't. I would want to foster their creativity and allow them to express themselves in whatever way they want. The reading grade for this book I think is Kindergarten and up. You can use this in any grade to show differences and perception. The Lexile Level is AD20L.

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review 2017-04-01 03:29
Duck! Rabbit!
Duck! Rabbit! - Amy Krouse Rosenthal,Tom Lichtenheld

Lexile Level: AD20L

 

This book is made up of pictures that could trick your brain into seeing different animals. The reader has to decide in the book if what they are looking at is in fact a duck or a rabbit. This book would be a great discussion starter to see what your students are thinking and to see who sees a duck and who sees a rabbit. I think kindergarten through second grade would love this book and to really open their minds to different possibilities. 

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review 2017-03-31 20:47
Duck! Rabbit!
Duck! Rabbit! - Amy Krouse Rosenthal,Tom Lichtenheld

This book would be great to use with younger grades such as kindergarten and first grade.  The Lexile level of this book is AD20L. It features two people who discuss whether or not the animal is a duck or a rabbit. This would be great to open a lesson on differences. While reading the book, students could make predictions about whether the animal is a duck or a rabbit. After the book has been read, students could use an activity sheet to draw the rest of the duck or rabbit in their habitat. The teacher could then talk to students about how many people can see the same thing differently, but that each opinion is still important and valuable. 

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