logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Ancient
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-17 21:27
A straightforward survey of the Persian empire
Ancient Persia: A Concise History of the Achaemenid Empire, 550-330 BCE - Matthew Waters

Considering the limited amount of materials available to study it there are a considerable number of surveys of ancient Persia for readers to choose from, ranging from A. T. Olmstead's classic History of the Persian Empire to Lindsay Allen's recent The Persian Empire. Matt Waters concise survey, which covers the history of the Achaemenid empire from the reign of Cyrus I to its conquest by Alexander the Great in 330 in a little more than 200 pages, offers little that is substantially different from these books. Its merits are in it concision and organization, as Waters presents his information in a clear and unadorned manner. Though some might find its style a little dry, its straightforward coverage of the basics of Persian history and the operations of the empire makes it an excellent book for anyone seeking a starting point for understanding a subject long distorted by ancient Greek authors and modern-day artists (I'm looking at you, Frank Miller!).

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-10 18:40
Baby trees -- but I don't need another hobby!
Bonsai Basics: A Step-by-Step Guide to Growing, Training & General Care - Christian Pessey,Remy Samson
Bonsai: Illustrated Guide to an Ancient Art - Sunset Books,Buff Bradley

I'm not sure when I bought these books, but it was probably around 2002 or 2003.  They've been in a box out in the workshop, untouched since at least 2006.  They may never have been opened or read.

 

Believe it or not, one of the reasons in favor of my staying in Arizona is that I don't want to leave my ironwood tree, especially after it bloomed so spectacularly last spring.  I had to leave a magnificent white oak tree when we moved from Indiana, and I'm just not sure I can uproot myself -- pun intended -- from another beloved tree.

 

It's possible, from what I've seen online, to grow desert ironwood trees as bonsai.  I think I can still find some seeds in the yard, but I'm not sure how well they sprout.  I haven't seen any seedlings in the yard, though we've had quite a bit of rain lately that has other little plants shooting up.

 

So, I gotta think about this.

Like Reblog Comment
url 2018-10-10 11:55
Why is subconscious mind an Amoeba covered in Mold
Conscious Parenting: Mindful Living Course for Parents - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Art of 4 Elements - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Tree of Life - Nataša Pantović Nuit
A-Ma Alchemy of Love - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Mindful Being - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Creativity: Mindfulness Meditations - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Spiritual Symbols: With their Meanings (Alchemy of love mindfulness training) (Volume 8) - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Power of Subconsciousness

If subconscious mind is more powerful than conscious  live Consciously?

an  by Nuit

The subconscious  is an integral part of the mind that modern psychologists acknowledge as an invisible layer of human . My research suggests a form of an amoeba rather than a layer, a hermaphrodite, morphed amoeba that in some of its manifestations is covered in mold. I’ll tell you in a minute why…

amoeba subconscious mind covered in mold

The subconscious mind patterns are programmed by repetition, -to-soul contacts and deep emotions. If the emotion is “fear” we run a risk of raising a child that will not properly develop Own-Self but stay in the shadows of the Parents’ Will-Power, or a solder that stays overpowered with his King who consciously or subconsciously wishes him to stay mentally and emotionally weak, so he can kill for his King.

Source: artof4elements.com/entry/227/why-is-subconscious-mind-amoeba-covered-in-mold
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-07 17:14
Podcast #119 is up!
Nemesis: Alcibiades and the Fall of Athens - David Stuttard

My latest podcast is up on the New Books Network website! In it, I interview David Stuttard about his biography of the Athenian leader Alcibiades. Enjoy!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-02 08:06
The Indus by Andrew Robinson
The Indus: Lost Civilizations (Reaktion Books - Lost Civilizations) - Andrew Robinson

TITLE:  The Indus:  Lost Civilizations

 

AUTHOR:  Andrew Robinson

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2015

 

FORMAT:  Hardcover

 

ISBN-13:  9781780235028

__________________________________

DESCRIPTION

When Alexander the Great invaded the Indus Valley in the fourth century BCE, he was completely unaware that it had once been the center of a civilization that could have challenged ancient Egypt and neighboring Mesopotamia in size and sophistication. In this accessible introduction, Andrew Robinson tells the story—so far as we know it—of this enigmatic people, who lay forgotten for around 4,000 years.

 

Going back to 2600 BCE, Robinson investigates a civilization that flourished over half a millennium, until 1900 BCE, when it mysteriously declined and eventually vanished. Only in the 1920s, did British and Indian archaeologists in search of Alexander stumble upon the ruins of a civilization in what is now northwest India and eastern Pakistan. Robinson surveys a network of settlements—more than 1,000—that covered over 800,000 square kilometers. He examines the technically advanced features of some of the civilization’s ancient cities, such as Harappa and Mohenjo-daro, where archaeologists have found finely crafted gemstone jewelry, an exquisite part-pictographic writing system (still requiring decipherment), apparently Hindu symbolism, plumbing systems that would not be bettered until the Roman empire, and street planning worthy of our modern world. He also notes what is missing: any evidence of warfare, notwithstanding an adventurous maritime trade between the Indus cities and Mesopotamia via the Persian Gulf. 

 

A fascinating look at a tantalizingly “lost” civilization, this book is a testament to its artistic excellence, technological progress, economic vigor, and social tolerance, not to mention the Indus legacy to modern South Asia and the wider world. “

 

______________________________

 

This is a short, nicely written, but scholarly summary of what is known about the Indus Civilization, which covered a large area in present day Pakistan and India from approximately 2600 to 1900 B.C.  Robinson briefly describes the discovery of this lost civilization, the problematic archaeology of the sites, the arts, crafts, agriculture, trade, possible social structure, religion, decline and disappearance.  The Indus script is also discussed in much detail.  Since little is known about this civilization despite the artefacts, a great deal of this book is speculative, but the author differentiates with what was found in terms of archaeology and the natural environmental, and what is more probably or less likely.  The general consensus is that more archaeological finds are necessary and that the script needs to be deciphered before any more definitive information about the Lost Indus Civilization can be revealed.  I found this book interesting and to be a good introduction to the subject.  The numerous photographs, maps and other illustrations were helpful.

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?