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review 2018-11-15 10:07
More or Less a Temptress (The Somerset Sisters, #3) by Anna Bradley
More or Less a Temptress (The Somerset Sisters #3) - Anna Bradley

 

 

Somersets don't make love easy, but they sure do keep society interested. More or Less a Temptress is Hyacinth's turn to shine. Instead she stirs up a ruckus that could impact more than her reputation. It could end with her losing her heart. Always bold, never boring and hard to resist, this group of sisters make showstopping fun.

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text 2018-11-10 19:39
I've given up!
Milkman - Anna Burns

I should know by now that a book that wins the Man Booker prize is going to do nothing for me. With the exception of White Tiger, I have never enjoyed a Man Booker prize winner and Milkman was no exception. I was listening to an excellent reading by Bríd Brennan, complete with genuine Irish accent, but even this could not make up for the unnecessary verbosity of this book. Huge credit to the narrator for making it to the end, I abandoned ship at 23%.

 

Just as an example, here is a typical paragraph:

"Considering alone his avowals of devotion towards women, his mission of idolatry, his supreme glorification and deification and view that on earth in women was the life of things, the breadth of things, the cyclicality, essential nature, higher aspect, the best, most archetypal and utmost mystery of everything." 

 

And this was then followed by an endless discourse about whether or not the sky was actually blue?

 

There was much scope to provide an understanding of life as a young girl during the time of the 'Troubles' in Northern Ireland. The way women were treated, the boys' names that were or weren't acceptable, who was 'in' and who was 'beyond the pail', This book kind of suffuses this into the reader by osmosis, but by the same token, it was becoming more and more irritating and I do my reading for enjoyment; I was not enjoying the style of this book at all.

 

My first abandoned book this year :(

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review 2018-11-09 21:32
Cancel the Milkman
Milkman - Anna Burns

As a native of Northern  Ireland and indeed spending a greater part of my teens in battle ridden Belfast I am well versed with the people and the country to appreciate or not Milkman by Anna Burns. I have to admit at first blush indeed for the first few chapters I was intrigued  by her intensive and somewhat claustrophobic style.  Here was a society built on gossip, a suspicious people hardened by a bitter indoctrination an unnerving belief in the supremacy of the catholic church or the teachings of such inflammatory demagogues as the most Reverent Ian Paisley, Jerry Adams or indeed intimation by the various sectarian groups UDA, IRA who viewed Belfast as their very own battle ground.

 

The best way to describe her style of writing is to think of a book and all the words that make up a story....take those words throw them high into the air and upon retrieval start reading....The experience is not quite right it's a jumbled and confusing picture that is painted which quite neatly sums up Milkman. This is a story where no one has a name and is narrated by middle sister who attempts to keep her mother and family ignorant of her maybe boyfriend and her rumoured affair with the Milkman. It is a story and language that tries to copy and show the small minded approach of a hypocritical populace where to be the wrong religion was a sentence of death, and where a strong opinion would leave you open to persecution by the shadowy renouncers. It didn't work for me with few chapters a total lack and use of paragraphs the whole experience was  muddled and confused. If the intent of the author was to get inside the mindset of the politically deranged "Ulsterman" it failed miserably and was a  great disappointment to me personally.

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text 2018-11-09 09:59
4/24 Tasks: 7th of November: Diwali
Anna Karenina - Larissa Volokhonsky,Richard Pevear,Leo Tolstoy
Gathering Blue - Lois Lowry
The MacKinnon's Bride (Highland Brides, # 1) - Tanya Anne Crosby
El oso de karantania - Cristina Loza
Heidi - Johanna Spyri
Anne of Avonlea - L.M. Montgomery
Pygmalion - George Bernard Shaw
Reforming Lord Ragsdale - Carla Kelly
Her Sister's Baby (Harlequin Superromance No. 627) - Janice Kay Johnson

Task 1:  Share a picture of your favorite light display. ~ I might be reaching here, but no man-made display has ever captivated me as much as the night sky (though lantern festivals come close).

Task 2:  Cleaning is a big part of this holiday; choose one of your shelves, real or virtual, and tidy / organise it.  Give us the before and after photos.  OR Tidy up 5 of the books on your BookLikes shelves by adding the CORRECT cover, and/or any other missing information.

 

Well, since I can never help myself, while searching for the girl with flowers covers I ended up merging one of my books into it's proper author, and I bet I'll end up doing some more, lol.

 

As for my physical library, I plan on an overhaul around Christmas, so I'll post pictures then.

Task 3: Eating sweets is also a big part of Diwali. Either select a recipe for a traditional sweet, or make a family favorite and share a picture with us.

 

Dulce de Leche!!

 

This is not an easy one to make, actually. I think we only attempted it once, it took a looooong time, and the consistence was not that firm (plus, I think we got a bit enthusiastic with the sodium bicarbonate)


Task 4: During Diwali, people pray to the goddess Lakhshmi, who is typically depicted as a beautiful young woman holding a lotus flower. Find 5 books on your shelves (either physical or virtual) whose covers show a young woman holding a flower and share their cover images.

 

I'm among those having a lot less difficulty finding women brandishing weapons than carying flowers among my covers, but children and classic books came to my rescue. Clearly, I might want to "make love not war" more reading-wise. If only I could find more romances that treaded better the line between crazy drama and blandness.

Book: Read a book with candles on the cover or the word “candle” or “light” in the title; OR a book that is the latest in a series; OR set in India; OR any non-fiction book that is ‘illuminating’ (Diwali is Sanskrit for light/knowledge and row, line or series)

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text 2018-11-08 15:15
24 Festive Tasks: Door 4 - Diwali, Task 4 (Book Covers: Young Women Holding Flowers)
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy,John Bayley,Larissa Volokhonsky,Richard Pevear
Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon - Jorge Amado
The Third Wedding - Costas Taktsis,Κώστας Ταχτσής
Cousin Phillis - Elizabeth Gaskell,Joe Marsh
The Virgin in the Garden - A.S. Byatt
The Bride Wore Black - William Irish,Cornell Woolrich
The Rose Rent - Ellis Peters
Goldengirl - Peter Lear
Death in the Stocks - Georgette Heyer
The Pursuit of Love - Nancy Mitford

Bookshelves: Classics, Women Writers, International (resp. various country / language shelves), Mysteries, Historical Fiction

 

I'm not a romance reader at all, but I've found ladies holding flowers (actually more than I could attach to this post) in unexpected places ...

 

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