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review 2017-09-15 20:48
How on earth did this get past an editor?
The Bestseller Code: Anatomy of the Blockbuster Novel - Jodie Archer,Matthew L. Jockers

This book won't tell you how to make your manuscript a blockbuster, record seller in the veins of 'Fifty Shades of Grey' or 'The Da Vinci Code' and the like. This book also really won't tell you much of anything else, either. A problem with having more than one author can be especially apparent when the writers have different styles, strengths or just plain ability to write.

 

I had been super excited by this book that (I thought) would help me understand why some books fly off the shelves. Bestsellers are rarely worth the hype in my opinion and I often avoid them. What is it that helps these books appeal to the masses? Word of mouth? The plot? Writing? Characters?

 

Honestly, it was hard to tell from this book. There appears to be some attempts at using cold data analysis (word usage) but there are also pieces that aren't quite as quantifiable in terms of numbers such as name recognition (Nora Roberts for example) or topic (certain subjects like Abraham Lincoln to stories about dogs are often sure to move numbers). 

 

The criticisms and negative reviews are on target. I had not realized this book had more than one author and it shows. It veers from being relatively readable to academic dry text. It is repetitive. In the end I became increasingly confused as to how it made it past an editor. This would have read MUCH better as a longform piece of journalism, a blog, etc. 

 

There might be interesting bits in here but overall I found it to be a waste of time and didn't really answer my questions. There are also spoilers for many books (in discussions of plot and whether that plays a role in what sells better), so be warned if you don't want to know. Overall I'd skip this one.

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review 2017-07-15 16:58
Everything you need to know before reading Eleven Minutes, by Paulo Coelho

Maria, a beautiful Brazilian girl went to Europe to work as an exotic dancer, but ended being a prostitute. An expensive one, "working" in a luxurious bar in Geneva. Maria's goal is to earn enough money to buy a farm in Brazil for her and her parents and leave Swizerland in a year. "Eleven minutes" is her story.

 

But what is her story?

 

The men she had met since she arrived in Geneva always did everything they could to appear confident, as if they were in perfect control of the world and of their own lives; Maria, however, could see in their eyes that they were afraid of their wife, the feeling of panic that they might not be able to get an erection, that they might not seem manly enough even to the ordinary prostitute whom they were paying for her services. If they went to a shop and didn’t like the shoes they had bought, they would be quite prepared to go back, receipt in hand, and demand a refund. And yet, even though they were paying for some female company, if they didn’t manage to get an erection, they would be too ashamed ever to go back to the same club again because they would assume that all the other women there would know.

Paulo Coelho - Eleven Minutes book, bestseller

‘I’m the one who should feel ashamed for being unable to arouse them, but, no, they always blame themselves.’
To avoid such embarrassments, Maria always tried to put men at their ease, and if someone seemed drunker or more fragile than usual, she would avoid full sex and concentrate instead on caresses and masturbation, which always seemed to please them immensely, absurd though this might seem, since they could perfectly well masturbate on their own.
She had to make sure that they didn’t feel ashamed. These men, so powerful and arrogant at work, constantly having to deal with employees, customers, suppliers, prejudices, secrets, posturings, hypocrisy, fear and oppression, ended their day in a nightclub and they didn’t mind spending three hundred and fifty Swiss francs to stop being themselves for a night.
‘For a night? Now come on, Maria, you’re exaggerating. It’s really only forty-five minutes, and if you allow time for taking off clothes, making some phoney gesture of affection, having a bit of banal conversation and getting dressed again, the amount of time spent actually having sex is about eleven minutes.’
Eleven minutes. The world revolved around something that only took eleven minutes.
 
And because of those eleven minutes in any one twenty-four-hour day (assuming that they all made love to their wives every day, which is patently absurd and a complete lie) they got married, supported a family, put up with screaming kids, thought up ridiculous excuses to justify getting home late, ogled dozens, if not hundreds of other women with whom they would like to go for a walk around Lake Geneva, bought expensive clothes for themselves and even more expensive clothes for their wives, paid prostitutes to try to give them what they were missing, and thus sustained a vast industry of cosmetics, diet foods, exercise, pornography and power, and yet when they got together with other men, contrary to popular belief, they never talked about women. They talked about jobs, money and sport.
Something was very wrong with civilisation, and it wasn’t the destruction of the Amazon rainforest or the ozone layer, the death of the panda, cigarettes, carcinogenic foodstuffs or prison conditions, as the newspapers would have it.
It was precisely the thing she was working with: SEX.
 
  • “Everything tells me that I am about to make a wrong decision, but making mistakes is just part of life. What does the world want of me? Does it want me to take no risks, to go back to where I came from because I didn't have the courage to say "yes" to life?”
     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

     “At every moment of our lives, we all have one foot in a fairy tale and the other in the abyss.”
     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

     “It is not time that changes man nor knowledge the only thing that can change someone's mind is love.”
     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes



     “Love is not to be found in someone else but in ourselves; we simply awaken it. But in order to do that, we need the other person.”

     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

     “Sometimes, you get no second chance and that its best to accept the gifts the world offers you.” 

    ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes


     “When we meet someone and fall in love, we have a sense that the whole universe is on our side. And yet if something goes wrong, there is nothing left!”
     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes


     “I am two women: one wants to have all the joy, passion & adventure that life can give me. The other wants to be a slave to routine, to family life, to the things that can be planned and achieved. I'm a housewife & a prostitute, both of us living in the same body & doing battle with each other. The meeting of these two women is a game with serious risks. A divine dance. When we meet, we are two divine energies, two universes colliding. If the meeting is not carried out with due reverence, one universe destroys the other.”
     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes



     “A writer once said that it is not time that changes man, nor knowledge; the only thing that can change someone's mind is love. What nonsense! The person who wrote that clearly knew only one side of the coin.”
     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes



     “In love, no one can harm anyone else; we are each responsible for our own feelings and cannot blame someone else for what we feel.”
     ― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes
     
    Reviews
     

     

    In comparison to my experiences with his other pieces. I can confidently say that this Paulo Cohelo work tests the reader in a unique and dangerous way.

    Each of his novels teach valuable lessons for adults through the interesting happenings of his protagonists. This story does the same. However the lesson taught borders on relationship counseling and sexual education. It was just as compelling and effective as it was uncomfortable. Uncomfortable in the sense that the information being learned as one reads each chapter is not theirs to have. He accomplishes this through the less than innovative approach of journal or diary entries, but envertheless, it is striking how moving it is to read the sexual and romantic discoveries of a conventional young lady.

    A book that is difficult to put down. A must-read for many, but especially those who have not yet discoveredy what makes them tick, oo and ahhh. Again, an inspiration!

 

Once upon a time, there was a bird. He was adorned with two perfect wings and with glossy, colorful, marvelous feathers. In short, he was a creature made to fly about freely in the sky, bringing joy to everyone who saw him.

One day, a woman saw this bird and fell in love with him. She watched his flight, her mouth wide in amazement, her heart pounding, her eyes shining with excitement. She invited the bird to fly with her, and the two traveled across the sky in perfect harmony. She admired and venerated and celebrated that bird.

But then she thought: He might want to visit far-off mountains! And she was afraid, afraid that she would never feel the same way about any other bird. And she felt envy, envy for the bird's ability to fly.

And she felt alone.

And she thought: "I'm going to set a trap. The next time the bird appears, he will never leave again."

The bird who was also in love, returned the following day, fell into the trap and was put in a cage.

She looked at the bird everyday. There he was, the object of her passion, and she showed him to her friends, who said: "Now you have everything you could possibly want." However, a strange transformation began to take place: now that she had the bird and no longer needed to woo him, she began to lose interest. The bird, unable to fly and express the true meaning of his life, began to waste away and his feathers to lose their gloss; he grew ugly; and the woman no longer paid him any attention, except by feeding him and cleaning out his cage.

One day, the bird died. The woman felt terribly sad and spent all her time thinking about him But she did not remember the cage, she thought only of the day when she had seen him for the first time, flying contentedly amongst the clouds.

If she had looked more deeply into herself, she would have realized that what had thrilled her about the bird was his freedom, the energy of his wings in motion, not his physical body.

Without the bird, her life too lost all meaning, and Death came knocking at her door. "Why have you come?" she asked Death. "So that you can fly once more with him across the sky," Death replied. "If you had allowed him to come and go, you would have loved and admired him even more; alas, you now need me in order to find him again."



So now I think that passage from the book already ate up my review so I'll just add some extra things.

First: As expected from Paulo Coelho this is another philosophical somewhat self-help, inspirational novel. This book was actually dedicated to a fan named Maurice Gravelines and Coelho met this guy unintentionally when he visited the Grotto in Lourdes. When they met the guy was like "You know, you look just like Paulo Coelho." And then Coelho said that yeah it was really him. And then the guy embraced him and he said to Coelho that, "They(Coelho's books) make me dream." I think that pretty sum up what kind of books Coelho's are.

Second: This book actually talks a lot about sex so I really recommend this book to adult readers, 18 years old and above. The novel has some masturbation scenes, BDSM, a blowjob scene etc. It just talks a lot about orgasm and in the other hand it also talks about the sacredness of sex and some history of prostitution blah blah blah. So really, adult readers or if you're sensitive about sex or anything about it maybe this book is not for you.

Third: My only complain about this book is that...there's actually a Filipino character in this book and she's a prostitute in the book and she's Maria's friend. My only problem about her is her name which is Nyah. I just really find her name weird and not very quote and quote Filipino. Maybe the author did not have time to research on it but the common names of Filipinos are similar to Spanish names and American names so I just really find it odd that her name's Nyah since it doesn't sound like a Filipino name. Maybe he could just name that character Juana or Ana or Susan but to name her Nyah, it was just odd. *shoulder shrug*

 

Some of my friends were raving about Coelho's "The Alchemist"; however, my first encounter with his writing is this book. I'm a little bit disappointed, though, because I expected more. 

Source: ebookstoreal.blogspot.al/2017/07/everything-you-need-to-know-before.html
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review 2017-05-29 18:07
Rezension | Die Geschichte der Bienen
Die Geschichte der Bienen: Roman - Maja Lunde,Ursel Allenstein

Beschreibung

 

Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts lebt der Samenhändler William Savage mit seiner Familie in England. Als sich sein Mentor Rahm von ihm abwendet, fällt er in eine tiefes Loch, denn William sieht sich als Forscher gescheitert. Seiner Kinder zuliebe rafft sich William jedoch nochmals auf um seine Idee für einen innovativen Bienenstock umzusetzen.

 

Wir schreiben das Jahr 2007. George ist Imker in den USA und arbeitet hart um seinen Betrieb auszubauen, so dass sein Sohn Tom ein zukunftsfähiges Erbe antreten kann. Jedoch hat Tom ganz andere Pläne, bis eines Tages etwas unfassbares geschieht. Die Bienen auf Georges Farm verschwinden.

 

Ein Sprung in die Zukunft zeigt, dass im Jahr 2098 die Weltbevölkerung deutlich geschrumpft ist. In China kämpfen die Menschen um ihr Überleben, denn die Bienen sind schon lange ausgestorben und der Anbau verschiedener Lebensmittel nicht mehr möglich. Die Arbeiterin Tao übernimmt die Arbeit der Bienen und bestäubt Tag für Tag die Bäume in Handarbeit.

 

Meine Meinung

 

Maja Lunde verwebt in „Die Geschichte der Bienen“, ihrem ersten Roman für Erwachsene, drei unterschiedliche Handlungsstränge (Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft) zu einer bewegenden und aufrüttelnden Geschichte rund um das Aussterben der Bienen und den daraus entsehenden Konsequenzen für die Menschheit.

 

Die drei einzelnen Geschichten an sich sind eher unaufgeregt und werden aus der Sicht des jeweiligen Protagonisten erzählt. Jedes Kapitel trägt den Namen des Protagonisten, so dass man gleich einordnen kann in welcher Erzählung man steckt. Da wäre der Forscher und Samenhändler William Savage der gegen Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts in England lebt, von Depressionen geplagt wird, kaum Selbstvertrauen in sich trägt, sich dennoch aufrafft im Bereich der Bienen etwas erfolgreiches zu Stande zu bringen. Dann gibt es noch den Imker George in den USA der Anfang des 21. Jahrhunderts mit viel Liebe und Leidenschaft seinen Hof leitet und alles daran setzt einen zukunftsfähigen Betrieb in die Hände seines Sohnes geben zu können.

 

Dadurch, dass Maja Lunde in kurz gehaltenen Kapiteln jedoch immer nur ein paar Einzelheiten zu der jewiligen Geschichten einfließen lässt, ergibt sich ein angenehmer Spannungsbogen der sich über das ganze Buch schlängelt. Kapitel für Kapitel fügen sich die einzelnen Puzzelteilchen zusammen, bis sie ein facettenreiches Gesamtwerk ergeben.

 

Die Fragen die Maja Lunde mit ihrem Roman „Die Geschichte der Bienen“ bezüglich dem Umgang mit der Umwelt und wie dies unsere Zukunft verändert aufwirft, haben mich sehr gefesselt. Durch das einweben realer Tatsachen wie z. B. die „Colony Collapse Disorder“ (CCD), eine aus den USA stammende Beschreibung für eine bestimmte Art des Bienensterbens, hat dem Roman zusätzlich Authentizität verliehen.

In meinen Augen spricht dieser Roman ein wichtiges Thema für die Menschen und die Zukunft auf unserem Planeten an. Die fiktive Geschichte über drei Schicksale in verschiedenen Epochen regt zum nachdenken an und wurde zu Recht mit dem norwegischen Buchhändlerpreis ausgezeichnet!

 

Fazit

 

Eine eindrucksvolle Geschichte die ein reales und äußerst wichtiges Thema anspricht. Unbedingt lesen!

Source: www.bellaswonderworld.de/rezensionen/rezension-die-geschichte-der-bienen-von-maja-lunde
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text 2017-04-21 11:24
SELFIES von Jussi Adler-Olsen
Selfies: Der siebte Fall für das Sonderdezernat Q in Kopenhagen Thriller (Carl Mørck) - Jussi Adler-Olsen,Hannes Thiess

Der siebte Fall für Carl Mørck und das Sonderdezernat Q in Kopenhagen.

Ein brutaler Todesfall in Kopenhagen, die Verbindung zu einem mehrere Jahre zurückliegenden und ausgesprochen brisanten cold case und Carls Assistentin Rose, die von grauenhaften Erinnerungen aus ihrer Vergangenheit heimgesucht wird.


Kann sie sich aus dem Dunkel befreien, in dem sie zu ertrinken droht?

Hol Dir den aktuellen Spiegel BESTSELLER jetzt: Selfies: Der siebte Fall für das Sonderdezernat Q in Kopenhagen Thriller (Carl Mørck) - Jussi Adler-Olsen

 

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review 2017-03-18 11:09
Burning through the pages
Ashes of London - Andrew Taylor

Andrew Taylor has made a career out of historical thrillers and his latest book is a compelling dive into post-republic Britain. Many of us perhaps recall 1666 as the year of the 'great fire of London', a catastrophic event in the history of the nation, often taught in classrooms alongside the impact of the plague, for which the fire is frequently regarded as a partial antidote. However, I for one, am short on detail, the impact for the city of such an event, both logistically, but also for individual citizens. In this book, Andrew Taylor draws us onto street level, as the inhabitants of the capital struggle to dampen the flames, which raged for days and threatened to cause irreparable damage. It's an interesting and dynamic backdrop into which the author deftly inserts a tale of intrigue, murder and power-broking which sustains the returned king, amid turmoil and a nation recovering from the tensions evoked under Oliver Cromwell.

 

James Marwood and Catherine ('Cat') Lovett are the adult children of regicides - those who had been directly instrumental in the execution of the king's father in Whitehall. Their respective families had flourished under parliamentarian rule and extremist religious views that were tolerated. However, the return of the monarchy was to confer profound changes to the fortunes of their respective fathers and emburdened the children with the associated shame and guilt. The book traces their respective interwoven journeys and struggles to survive, thereby lifting a veil on the often brutal life in London at that time, the machinations of the state, society and the fluctuating fortunes of the aristocracy, political and lower classes.

 

In some ways there are intriguing and tangible parallels with today. The destruction of a major city creates a flood of refugees and it is the rich and powerful best placed to survive the tumult, with most choices. Still, amid the generalized mayhem and economic disaster, with the attendant winners and losers, Taylor has developed a compelling plot, which made this reader want to know how circumstances pan out for the central characters.

 

Top of the bestseller list for this genre for weeks, Taylor has clearly tapped into an appetite for fast-moving action and in spite of the historical context the quality of the writing and the strength of the characters gives this book broad appeal. Worth noting there are instances of violence in the book, but handled well by the author, in my view and in keeping with the unsanitized description of a great city convulsed by time and happenstance. Well worth reading.

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