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text 2017-11-18 14:28
Reading progress update: I've read 371 out of 652 pages.
William Pitt the Younger: A Biography - William Hague

Huh? I had no idea that the episode of Hornblower that featured Quiberon Bay (the one with Antony Sher as the mad French Aristocrat) was based on a real event.

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text 2017-11-18 11:55
Reading progress update: I've read 314 out of 652 pages.
William Pitt the Younger: A Biography - William Hague

Hague only spent 14 pages on Pitt's involvement in the abolition of slavery.

 

14 teeny tiny pages.

 

One of the shortest chapters in the book so far.

 

I can only surmise that he left the details for his subsequent book on William Wilberforce, which I will read, too, at some point because I am enjoying Hague's writing quite a lot. (And that's something I'd never thought I'd say!)

 

Here's hoping Hague goes into more detail about Pitt's stance on Ireland.

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review 2017-11-13 16:34
Anger Is An Energy by John Lydon
Anger is an Energy: My Life Uncensored - John Lydon
Interesting bio from an interesting  man.
I feel like I sat down and had a conversation with Johnny Rotten about his life. I knew a bit about him, the bands he played in and even other things he has been up to. I feel like I know so much more now. Getting glimpses into the backstage part of the show, sort-to-speak.
What a story too! Being a fan I was completely enthralled throughout. Especially in those private moments where he talks about Sid, and Nancy too. I've always wondered about his point of view. Now I have it.
I do feel that he bounced around a lot when telling a story, I mean, if you have ever heard him talk then you probably get what I mean. He gets back to where he needs to be, but often gets sidetracked in the stories. 
It's all good though, and fans, like me, will eat it up!
 
 
Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2017/11/anger-is-energy-by-john-lydon-23.html
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review 2017-11-10 07:59
In my Top Ten list of History books
Africa: A Biography of the Continent - John Reader

This is a wonderful and highly readable book, but do not misunderstand what it is about. The subtitle is completely honest: this is not a book (entirely) about human history in Africa; this is a book about the African continent.  As such, it is divided into three approximately equal sections:

 

1) Natural History: 

This describes the formation of the African continent during the cooling phase of the Earth's crust. Africa is unusual among continents for being composed of just three giant cratons. A large portion is dedicated to the formation of the Bushveld Igneous Complex- the single largest and richest concentration of mineral wealth on the planet, and almost the sole accessible source of some strategic materials like chromium. 

 

This part progresses to the emergence of life, and the considerable evidence that humans find their origin in Africa, with our present form emerging somewhere between 2 and 4 million years ago, depending on what criteria you apply, and how you interpret the available evidence.

 

2) Anthropology:

Development of human civilization in Africa, and importantly- the co-evolution of other organisms with the human species in their land of origin.  This is a big deal, because all the evidence suggests that humans only left their mother continent about 120,000 years ago. We are an invading foreign species everywhere else on the globe, and like most introduced species, we had fewer natural predators and parasites outside of Africa. Malaria is the best example of an organism which co-developed in evolution, in Africa, alongside humans. Humans even adapted with rearrangements of hemoglobin, which can be beneficial in the hybrid SC form, but deadly in the SS homozygous form (i.e. Sickle Cell Anemia).  This, and other similar examples account for the comparatively slower growth rate of human communities within Africa, compared to without, and some of these issues continue to plague Africa today. 

 

"Expatriot" groups returning to Africa about 15,000 years ago transformed human development on the continent by introducing foreign species which had been domesticated in Asia. Most important of these were cattle. Skeletal remains have shown two different pathways that Africans took with this new resource:

a) cattle raising for meat (in which skeletal remains show an equal number of males and females in the herd). and

b) cattle raising for milk: (in which skeletal remains show most males in the herd were slaughtered) 

 

The two patterns have different land-use and social development implications, which were fascinating to read.

 

There is an entire section dedicated to exploring how conditions, particularly around present-day Nigeria, led to the development of acephalous social structures... some of the largest and most sophisticated examples of completely decentralized human communities with essentially no leaders. It was a development which fit the local environment well, at the time it developed, but made Africa in general extremely vulnerable to foreign attackers with heirarchical social systems concentrating,  commanding, and directing resources against them. This began in earnest with contact with Arab slavers on the East coast of the continent, beginning about 800 years ago, and really picked up pace with European contact in the 1500's.

 

...Which brings us to the subject of slavery. It is an indigenous African practice, which evolved from traditions of adoption and extended family (mutual) obligations. Going back to what I said about malaria and Africa's slow population growth... this created a demand for labor which was sometimes answered with warfare and enslavement of the vanquished, or with peaceful indentured servitude agreements (some coerced, some not; some for a lifetime, some for more limited terms).  The upshot of all this is that a well-established social acceptance of slavery, and a well-developed economic system of slave acquisition and trade was in place by the time Arab slavers arrived in the 1200's or so.  Later, beginning with the Portuguese, Europeans fed this system, and in a sense "addicted" the economies in present-day Congo and Angola to the slave trade. Outright slavery continued in Africa into the 20th century, and many of the proto-slavery practices (i.e. adoption of orphaned relatives, in exchange for limited periods of enforced servitude) continue today.  One interesting observation:  plantations in North America tried on several well-documented occasions to force Native Americans into slavery, but the enslaved never cooperated. They simply refused to work, even on pain of death. The reason is that slavery was a foreign concept to them. Slavery is not a useful institution to hunter-gatherer societies, which don't cultivate or hoard large amounts of food (or any other possessions). It is only in pastoral or agricultural civilizations that large amounts of manpower are needed to work the land.  Africans brought to North America as slaves were mainly from agricultural areas of Western Africa which unfortunately understood well the concept of slavery, and culturally accepted it sufficiently to participate in it, in a way that Native Americans did not.

 

3) Human History:

This is the names and dates History that I had expected the entire book to be. There is little well-documented history before Arab contact.. the Great Zimbabwe, the Egyptian pharaoh dynasties, and the Biblical-era Ethiopians being the standout exceptions. Once Arabs entered the continent, with their written systems of recording, History as we think of it really takes off.  The book is necessarily superficial, covering an entire continent for about 800 years. As expected, there is a lot about colonialism, particularly the Dutch and British in South Africa, the Germans in Tanzania, and the British in Kenya and Egypt. The book follows through to the many independence movements in the 1950's and 60's, and ends ominously with the Rwandan genocide and the probable CIA assassination of Patrice Lumumba- first elected Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

 

Overall this is a definite Five Star book, and on my personal Top Ten History Books list.

 

Highly recommended!

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2017-11-03 15:33
How to Get a Millennial to Clean a Toilet – Permission To Screw Up by Kristen Hadeed @KristenHadeed
Permission to Screw Up: How I Learned to Lead by Doing (Almost) Everything Wrong - Kristen Hadeed,Simon Sinek

If you want to know how to get a millennial to clean a toilet, try reading Kristen Hadeed’s Permission To Screw Up.

 

Have some laughs and learn how she succeeded, regardless of the mistakes she made along the way.

 

Permission to Screw Up: Learning to Lead by Doing (Almost) Everything Wrong

Goodreads  /  Amazon

 

MY REVIEW

 

First off, I want to say I enjoyed Permission To Screw Up by Kristen Hadeed and had my share of laughs and chuckles while reading it and shaking my head. BUT, I would not classify this as a guide to success.  It reads more like a biography than a How To Succeed story. I feel Kristen Hadeed had a great idea and stumbled her way into success, but many others would fail if they followed her path.

 

It all started with a pair of $100 jeans, that her parents wouldn’t buy for her, and an ad on Craig’s list to clean houses. Just goes to show, where there’s a will, there’s a way.

 

I tossed most of the notes I took as I sat here trying to write this review. Like any nonfiction book, you take the information that works for you and you leave the stuff that doesn’t.

 

Millennials – 1982 to 2004. I like that Kristen was upfront about her mistakes and her feelings about millennials. It’s just like any generalization, it doesn’t apply to everyone.

 

When she blew off checking into her trademark before using it, I thought that about summed up my opinion of some of the pitfalls of millennials. They can be lazy. They are handicapped, only have one hand available, because they have their phone in the other one. They think Google has all the answers and their parents will take care of everything for them. But, again, this is only a generalization and doesn’t apply to all millennials.

 

I like that she wasn’t too proud to ask for help, and find the place to get the answers she needed, though it’s not like she didn’t try to have someone do it for her…at times.

 

I like that she talks about the Participation Generation, where you get rewards just for showing up. Helicopter parents – parents who hover, overprotective, over involved, and over indulging their children.  How can a person like that accept criticism. Kristen learned that there is “a time for pep talks and a time for reality checks.”

 

I like that at the end of each chapter is a quick summary that hits the highlights.

 

I do look at this as her story, not so much a business book. She does share some helpful hints and reminds us that even the most experienced leader can learn something new and improve their leadership style. She does share her thoughts about the value of employees being happy, even while mopping floors or cleaning toilets.

 

Would I recommend Permission To Screw Up? Yes, especially for the younger generation and the beginning entrepreneur, to show that mistakes are not failures, just learning experiences. Also, for anyone who likes to read biographies, Kristen Hadeed does have a fun and interesting story to tell.

 

I borrowed a copy of Permission To Screw Up by Kristen Hadeed from a friend.

 

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos 3 Stars

 

Read more here.

 

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Source: www.fundinmental.com/how-to-get-a-millennial-to-clean-a-toilet-permission-to-screw-up-by-kristen-hadeed-kristenhadeed
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