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review 2017-09-13 03:24
Review: John Dies At The End
John Dies at the End - David Wong,Stephen R. Thorne

This book was an exercise in insanity!  This is not the first time I've said this about a book, and considering there are two sequels to this, it won't be the last!

 

Sometimes I'm not sure if I'm too generous with my book ratings, or if I just have superb taste and amazing luck at picking great ones. I'd like to believe it's the latter...so I will.

 

My hubby and I, on a late night Netflix binge, saw this movie and were intrigued by the title--hello, spoilers!  So we watched knowing it would be my kind of flick.   It was bizarre and yet good.  Bizarrely good.  Horror/comedy with a bit of camp.  Everything you need to make a future cult classic.  And of course the moment I found out it was based on a book, it went on my wishlist.   And let me tell you, it is surprisingly hard to get a used copy of this book!  (I was on a budget and trying not to give Amazon any more of my money.)

 

And after I finally got a copy, I didn't read it right away.  Big mistake! Huge!  If I could kick my own butt for waiting so long, I would.

 

The whole thing is told from David Wong's point of view (yes the author is also a character).  I normally hate first person stories, but this was great.  It's about David and John and their ridiculous shenanigans.  It's like they get into the kind of situations that you just can't make up.  I had a friend like that once. She would get into the craziest stuff, and I was there half the time, so I know she wasn't making it up.

 

In the story there's this drug called 'soy sauce' and it's pretty much a gateway to hell--or so Dave and John think.  Crazy things happen when you're on the sauce, a whole new part of your mind is opened up to you.  And once it's opened, there's no closing it!

 

John takes it on purpose, and Dave is accidentially stabbed by the needle he confiscated from John.  Now they are seeing things they would have never wanted in a million years, ever wanted to see.  And they're able to do things--almost supernatural type things.  They get caught up in some serious mess all because of this 'soy sauce', and no matter how hard Dave tries to pull them out, John keeps dragging them in deeper.  It's almost like their [undisclosed] town is situated on a hellmouth!  And John and Dave are the 'slayers' poised to save the world.

 

Everything in this book is just insane. It's the right amount of dark, creepy, crazy and funny.  It's like Evil Dead with two good Ashes.  I loved every minute of it.  And now I'm about to dive into the sequel as soon as I post this.

 

...Why does it always have to be spiders?!

 

 

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text 2017-09-12 15:42
Reading progress update: I've read 306 out of 466 pages.
John Dies at the End - David Wong,Stephen R. Thorne

So much insanity!  The movie was pretty on the nose, but this book is soooo much more. 

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text 2017-09-11 19:06
Reading progress update: I've read 145 out of 466 pages.
John Dies at the End - David Wong,Stephen R. Thorne

This books is as bizarrely hilarious as the movie! I'm loving it!  I'm back and forth between reading, and listening to the audiobook when I can't hold the book.  I'm loving it.

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review 2017-09-09 00:29
Review: The Joy Luck Club
The Joy Luck Club - Amy Tan

So, I hate when I keep books on my 'TBR' list for so long that I regret waiting so long to read them.  I loved the movie, so I knew the book would be even better.  After having read the book, it is better (of course), but doesn't take away from the movie.

 

This is a book about mothers and daughters.  About the generation gap, cultural gap, and language gap between the Chinese born mothers and their American born daughters.

 

It's sad in some ways because it seems as their their relationships are base on obligation more so than love.  The mother's wanted so badly for their daughters to be worth something and to have nice things  and better opportunities in America, that they waited to long to instill their Chinese beliefs/wisdom in them.  Which was very much to the detriment of the daughters.  The girls (for a time) only care about being American and fitting it with their American peers.  And it wasn't until later in all of their lives that they realized what they had missed out on.

 

The mother's obviously loved their daughters very much; however, the way the showed it was so foreign to the girls that they really had no clue; all they saw was harassment, disappointment, embarrassment...  Their stories, which were life lessons, seemed like nothing but fairy stories from the "old country".  The two generations were battling a language gap, not because the daughters spoke English where their mothers spoke Mandarin or Cantonese, but because they spoke the languages of two separate generations from two different countries.  

 

The mothers clung so much to the old ways, except where raising their daughter's were concerned and by the time they realized what they had done (or not done) it was too late.  And the daughters never paid attention to the lessons that they were taught.  And by the time they realized that they were lessons, it was too late.

 

The mothers and daughters spoke to one another, but it all seemed to get lost in translation.  As was said in the book, the daughters would hear less than what their mothers had said, and the mother's would always hear much more than what their daughters had actually said.

 

They were all broken, emotionally injured in some way or another, and because none of them had learned to communicate with each other, it was near in possible to help.  It was beautiful and so very sad, especially for me as a mother of two daughters.  I hope that I have learned to not only speak clearly, but hear what my daughters say.

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review 2017-06-15 20:38
Blacklist
Blacklist - Sara Paretsky

Wow. You would think Sara Paretsky had a crystal ball and could look into the future of America with this book.

 

"Blacklist" taking place in a post 9/11 America where everyone who is a Muslim is automatically a terrorist is starting to wear on VI. Due to her protesting during her college days, she knows what a slippery slope the US is in right now with allowing The Patriot Act to allow the government to spy on its citizens all for the great good of security. When VI is asked by one of her long-standing clients to look into his mother's accusations that someone has broken into their old home, VI comes across a dead journalist/writer. And it looks like his investigations into a pioneer in the African American art scene during the Red Scare in the U.S. has run into an America that is ready to do whatever it can in the name of terrorism.

 

I loved this book and it in turn broke my heart while reading. VI can be self righteous. But you definitely (or I did) get where she is coming from. You can see parallels to what the US did back in the 50/60s to those who they claimed where Communists to them saying anyone with brown skin is automatically an enemy. VI ends up running into a powerful publisher and a character who reminded me a little too much of Glen Beck while I was reading.

 

We get the usual cast of characters in this one. We also have VI feeling lost now that her lover Morello is in Afghanistan investigating the Taliban. She makes a lot of comparisons to her being Penelope and him being Odysseys. I would have to say though that no one puts VI in the corner, so it was a bit much to have her being all fire and brimstone towards anyone who is blocking her ability to figure out who murdered this journalist to them being all weepy over the state of her love life.

 

The ending shocked me (in a good way). I wish that sometimes Paretsky would do what Sue Grafton does with her Kinsey Millhone detective books and write an epilogue. I hate things being left twisting in the wind.

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