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review 2017-06-15 20:38
Blacklist
Blacklist - Sara Paretsky

Wow. You would think Sara Paretsky had a crystal ball and could look into the future of America with this book.

 

"Blacklist" taking place in a post 9/11 America where everyone who is a Muslim is automatically a terrorist is starting to wear on VI. Due to her protesting during her college days, she knows what a slippery slope the US is in right now with allowing The Patriot Act to allow the government to spy on its citizens all for the great good of security. When VI is asked by one of her long-standing clients to look into his mother's accusations that someone has broken into their old home, VI comes across a dead journalist/writer. And it looks like his investigations into a pioneer in the African American art scene during the Red Scare in the U.S. has run into an America that is ready to do whatever it can in the name of terrorism.

 

I loved this book and it in turn broke my heart while reading. VI can be self righteous. But you definitely (or I did) get where she is coming from. You can see parallels to what the US did back in the 50/60s to those who they claimed where Communists to them saying anyone with brown skin is automatically an enemy. VI ends up running into a powerful publisher and a character who reminded me a little too much of Glen Beck while I was reading.

 

We get the usual cast of characters in this one. We also have VI feeling lost now that her lover Morello is in Afghanistan investigating the Taliban. She makes a lot of comparisons to her being Penelope and him being Odysseys. I would have to say though that no one puts VI in the corner, so it was a bit much to have her being all fire and brimstone towards anyone who is blocking her ability to figure out who murdered this journalist to them being all weepy over the state of her love life.

 

The ending shocked me (in a good way). I wish that sometimes Paretsky would do what Sue Grafton does with her Kinsey Millhone detective books and write an epilogue. I hate things being left twisting in the wind.

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text 2015-09-28 21:15
I can watch Red Reddington I mean The Blacklist all day long...

A bit of a reading slump today. But then again I don't mind. I've been watching The Blacklist instead since I haven't finished S2 yet and it soon time for S3 to start. 

 

But I'm going to take a break now and read a couple of chapters. I do want to save some epsiodes for tomorrow...:)

 

 

 

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text 2013-10-20 04:08
Oh, just a list.....

last edit: 20 October 2013

 

for posterity and my own personal reminder.

 

This list is NOT intended to cause harm or any sort of distress on the individuals contained herein. However, if it somehow (although highly unlikely) contributes to a significant decrease in their sales, unfortunately that is not my problem and I do not have a moral responsibility in ensuring a writer's financial success.

 

No bullying here, folks, move along.

 

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text 2013-10-02 00:18
SNC Lavalin Canadian Companies World Bank blacklist

Canada leads World Bank blacklist of fraudulent companies thanks to SNC-Lavalin

 

Canada leads the world in companies and individuals that have been banned by the World Bank from contributing to international aid and infrastructure projects.

 

Of the 608 companies and individuals listed on the World Bank’s just-released blacklist for fraudulent or corrupt conduct, 119 are Canadian companies. But engineering firm SNC-Lavalin and its subsidiaries, many of which are registered outside Canada, comprise 16 per cent of the total.

 

The World Bank bans companies from participating in aid and development contracts if they “have been sanctioned under the Bank’s fraud and corruption policy.”

 

The number of companies included on that list soared in 2013, rising from only 65 banned entities on last year’s list, according to the South China Morning Post. The World Bank says about $40 billion of the roughly $200 billion it has given out since 2008 has been stolen.

 

Companies with head offices listed in Canada, which does not include overseas subsidiaries, comprise 119 names on the World Bank list, the most of any country. The U.S. is second with 44 debarred firms, Indonesia third with 43 and Britain close behind with 40.

 

The grounds for getting blacklisted vary, but usually include some manner of bribery, fraud, collusion, coercion or obstruction either in bidding for contracts or in carrying them out.

The most prominent name on the World Bank list, by far, is SNC-Lavalin, which has been mired in scandal for the last two years. Of the companies banned for corruption and fraud, SNC-Lavalin has 102 entries on the blacklist, stemming from a blanket ban against the company from earlier in 2013.

 

The World Bank has debarred SNC-Lavalin from working on its projects for 10 years after company officials were linked to bribery in a bridge project in Bangladesh. There are also corruption allegations in relation to a World Bank-financed rural electricity project in Cambodia.

 

The RCMP raided the Montreal headquarters of the engineering and construction giant in April as part of an investigation into $56 million in mysterious payments. One multimillion-dollar payment allegedly went to the family of former Tunisian dictator Zine el Abidine Ben Ali to win construction contracts in the North African country. The company also had ties to Libya’s former dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

 

The former CEO of SNC-Lavalin, Pierre Duhaime, was charged with fraud in late 2011 in connection with the Quebec anti-corruption commission, which has been probing corruption in the province’s construction sector.

 

A request from Canada.com for comment from SNC-Lavalin went unanswered Tuesday, as did a similar request to the Department of Foreign Affairs Canada.

Foreign Minister John Baird spoke out against corruption on a trip to Algeria over the weekend, another country where SNC-Lavalin is embroiled in bribery allegations.

 

“This company does not represent all Canadian businesses, which give huge importance to ethics,” Baird said in a joint news conference with his Algerian counterpart on Sunday. “It is obvious that they must pay for their actions through the courts.”

 

Despite SNC-Lavalin’s ongoing legal problems, however, the Canadian government recommended the company for a hospital-building project in Trinidad and Tobago through the little-known Crown corporation the Canadian Commercial Corporation. The 2012 recommendation came amid allegations of wrongdoing in the company’s international dealings, but before bans by the World Bank and the Canadian International Development Agency.

 

CIDA has since been absorbed into Foreign Affairs.

 

Use the interactive database below to see which companies are on the blacklist. Typing “SNC” in all-caps should be a good starting point.

 

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text 2013-10-01 08:31
Canada leads World Bank blacklist of fraudulent companies thanks to SNC-Lavalin

http://o.canada.com/news/snc-lavalin-canadian-companies-world-bank-blacklist/

 

Canada leads the world in companies and individuals that have been banned by the World Bank from contributing to international aid and infrastructure projects.

 

Of the 608 companies and individuals listed on the World Bank’s just-released blacklist for fraudulent or corrupt conduct, 119 are Canadian companies. But engineering firm SNC-Lavalin and its subsidiaries, many of which are registered outside Canada, comprise 16 per cent of the total.

 

The World Bank bans companies from participating in aid and development contracts if they “have been sanctioned under the Bank’s fraud and corruption policy.”

 

The number of companies included on that list soared in 2013, rising from only 65 banned entities on last year’s list, according to the South China Morning Post. The World Bank says about $40 billion of the roughly $200 billion it has given out since 2008 has been stolen.

 

Companies with head offices listed in Canada, which does not include overseas subsidiaries, comprise 119 names on the World Bank list, the most of any country. The U.S. is second with 44 debarred firms, Indonesia third with 43 and Britain close behind with 40.

 

The grounds for getting blacklisted vary, but usually include some manner of bribery, fraud, collusion, coercion or obstruction either in bidding for contracts or in carrying them out.

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