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review 2018-01-02 02:09
A Matter of Honor: Pearl Harbor: Betrayal, Blame, and a Family's Quest for Justice - Anthony Summers,Robbyn Swan

In "A Matter of Honor: Pearl Harbor: Betrayal, Blame, and a Family's Quest for Justice" Anthony Summers has written what is likely to be the definitive account of the events that led to the Pearl Harbor attack (on the U.S. Pacific Fleet) of December 7th, 1941 and the failures among the U.S. political and military leadership that helped make the attack likely. 

Summers has a deserved reputation as a journalist/writer who leaves no stone unturned and scrupulously explores every source available to him, checking thoroughly for the veracity of various documents and data he finds on a subject that is his prime interest. Some years ago, I read his biography of J. Edgar Hoover - 'Official and Confidential, The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover' - which made me a fervent fan of his work. (The way he was able to marshal facts and personal accounts from people who both worked closely for Hoover or suffered as the result of his unjust acts, absolutely captivated my interest in the book.) And here in "A Matter of Honor", as a way of giving a further scope to the common narrative of the Pearl Harbor attack that has been perpetuated for decades, Summer provides the reader with a compelling account of the life and career of Admiral Husband E. Kimmel - the commander of the Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor. Here was a man who devoted his whole life to the U.S. Navy, from his time at Annapolis in the early 1900s, to the various commands he served - always earning the highest commendations from his superiors. He truly epitomized through his personal conduct and service all that could be asked for from an officer. 

Yet, from the time, Kimmel was made commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet in February 1941, there are factors that Summers brings to light that show that Kimmel and his Army counterpart, General Walter Short, were not provided with all the resources they needed to defend Hawaii against a possible Japanese attack. This was during a time when diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Japan were deteriorating, and by the latter part of 1941, it was judged likely by both Washington and the top military leadership that war between the 2 countries would result. (Indeed, the U.S. military had broken the Japanese military and diplomatic codes - and so, had some sense of what Tokyo was contemplating as a resolution to its impasse with Washington.) 

This is a book that anyone who wants to know the definitive account of who(m) is (are) responsible or culpable for the tragedy of Pearl Harbor should read and then quietly reflect upon. I know that I will never again judge Admiral Husband Kimmel as guilty as dereliction of duty. In my view, he was a convenient scapegoat (which is not easy for me to admit, as someone who had earlier accepted wholesale the official stories behind Admiral Kimmel's and General Short's "neglect" of Hawaii's defense).

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review 2017-10-28 01:35
Cute Contemporary
Blame It on the Bet (Whiskey Sisters) (V... Blame It on the Bet (Whiskey Sisters) (Volume 1) - L. E. Rico

Hennessey O’Halloran and her sisters are trying to save their pub following their father’s death.  Bryan Truitt is a developer who want’s the land their pub sits on for land development. They make a bet that will either save the pub for the O’Halloran’s or give Bryan what he wants.

This was a cute story that was an easy quick read. The characters were likable and the story kept you entertained. I highly recommend.

**I voluntarily read and reviewed this book

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review 2017-08-14 00:06
Bride Of The Bad Boy (Blame It On Bob) (Harlequin Desire) - Bevarly

cute in a stupid sort of way. Stupid as in, do people really act like that?

 

Ok then. The H is in this quiet town to "negotiate" a deal with a local pharma

ceutical company for the mob. He's driving a convertible of European engineering, and renting a house. I'm not sure how this is supposed to keep anyone from being suspicious of him but apparently the h and maybe one of her fellow journalists are the only ones who find this odd. His attempts to talk tough come across as cheesy. And the h's accusations hurt his feelings (?!)

 

The h is a bored journalist who is suspicious - the guy has been in town a week, supposedly represents a chemical company, and has yet to contact the pharmaceutical company. She knows this because her dad owns said company. Her fellow bored journalist has dug things up that connect him to the mob. She breaks into the house he's renting for some inexplicable reason. He catches her. She tries to warn her dad who irritates me by coming across as decidedly dismissive. She writes a couple of articles all but accusing him. He coerces her into marriage. (I'd love to know what her dad thought when all these slimy looking mob guys showed up at the wedding. Hah!)

 

He finally comes clean - after the wedding night of course - telling her that he's actually DEA and undercover. She's miffed - somewhat understandably I guess, but at this point..

 

I found her behavior when confronted odd, particularly for a college grad and journalist. I had a great deal of difficulty taking her seriously. And I really ponder why she stayed there when her dad treated her like she was 12.

 

The H was just one of those guys who I wonder how he was capable of holding his job. We never see him as a cop - that was offpage (gee thanks). We just see him as this dingbat who manages not to blow his cover just by existing mostly because everyone else is oblivious.

 

According to my booklist, I have the other two. Yay?

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review 2017-08-09 19:42
Blame - Jeff Abbott
Blame is running rampant in Lakehaven, Texas. Fingers are being pointed all over the small little town and they mostly seem to be pointing at Jane Norton. A seventeen year old girl who crashed her car with her neighbor and best friend, David Hall in a seemingly one vehicle involved accident. Jane woke up after four days in a coma to discover that she has lost three years of memories. Those three years contain the death of her father and three years at high school. 

At first when she woke up, she didn't even recognize her mother. Although that memory came about very soon. Her friends, before high school, she remembers, as fourteen years old, not as they are today. Her new friends made in high school, she doesn't remember at all. She even has to relive the fact of her father's death due to an accident while handling a gun. A memory that was horrible to live through the first time.

When a suicide note is found near the crash several days later, Jane is blamed for the death of her friend, David. David is a very popular guy at school, Jane isn't or wasn't until now. However, her popularity is entirely negative. David has lived next door to her for years, they grew up together. She considered the Halls her extended family, not anymore. The fingers are pointing to blame and it's all in Jane's direction. This leads Jane to extremes in her living situation as she can't stand to live in "that house" anymore.

This is just the start of this book that leads to lots of suspense, action, jaw dropping findings, backstabbing, false newspaper stories, and mystery. The allegations have Jane determined she did not kill David, it was an accident and she will do whatever it takes to change everyone's opinion.

Another great read by Jeff Abbott that I requested on sight and am absolutely grateful to Grand Central Publishing and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
 
 

 

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review 2017-04-16 00:00
Blame
Blame - Paul Read Blame - Paul Read

So good!
I’m so glad I came across this book, I read it almost in one sitting, it was unputdownable!

Lucas, a successful pharmaceutical scientist, receives the news about the sudden death of his father with whom he hasn’t been in contact for many years. He goes back to his hometown to manage the legacy and to arrange the funeral, and the memories from the past that were long blurred come to the surface.

The story movies between now and Lucas teenager’s dairy, and evokes all possible emotions. It is tragic and funny at the same time. What happened in the past between Lucas and his father? Was a heart attack the real cause of his sudden death? A lot of unanswered questions, but you'll get all answers at the end.

Paul Read offers an excellent family psychological drama, brilliant prose, an eloquent and witty writing style, well-developed and authentic characters and a highly satisfying ending.

I cannot recommend it highly enough!


**Copy provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review**
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