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review 2017-05-12 08:00
Body Work
Rivers of London: Body Work - Ben Aaronovitch,Lee Sullivan Hill,Andrew Cartmel

I'm a big fan of the Rivers of London series, but I did hesitate a little before ordering Body Work, the first of a series of graphic novels that tell additional stories to the main series. I'm not always pleased with the way an artist interprets characters, so I was not sure I would like this graphic novel.

I needn't worry. It was great. Body Work, together with its sequel Night Witch, gave me one of the most relaxing evenings of the year so far (read it while listening to Gymnopedies, the world seemed perfect for a moment). In all seriousness though, I really liked it. It is not necessary to read this for the story I guess (but I can't be sure as I haven't read Foxglove Summer yet - yes, still waiting for that right edition).

Peter and his friends investigate 'England's most haunted car'. Also, there are some very very short stories in it as well. I suppose there's one at the end of each issue, but since I read the volume edition, I can't be sure.

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review 2017-01-10 16:39
Rivers of London : Body Work Issue #3 / Ben Aaronovitch
Rivers of London: Body Work - Ben Aaronovitch,Luis Lobo-Guerrero,Lee Sullivan Hill,Andrew Cartmel

The members – all two of them – of London’s most secret police force are on the trail of a self-driving killer car. But it takes something weird to catch something weird and soon they are behind the wheel of… The Most Haunted Car in England!

 

I am the first to admit that I don’t always fully appreciate graphic novels and I will also confess that I prefer the full Aaronovitch novels to the graphic novels, but I still enjoyed my first graphic foray into the London of Peter Grant. I know for a fact that I’ll be buying future installments as they become available in print in Canada.

I think that’s my biggest frustration at this point—if I used an e-reader, I could have all the graphic novels, but here in Canada there are only two paper copy titles available and they are not being produced in order either! How to drive a library worker crazy!

I’m fond of the depiction of Peter—I wasn’t sure at first, but it grew on me. Also liked Beverly Brook. (Particularly the James Bond-ish artwork at the very beginning of this issue, with Peter looking suave and Beverly emerging from the water, reminiscent of Halle Berry in Die Another Day). The best of them all? Toby, the dog! He is exactly the yappy little dog that I had in my head as I read the novels. I’m hoping that Nightingale and Molly grow on me as well. Nightingale needs to look a trifle older in my opinion and Molly needs to look a bit creepier, perhaps somewhat reptilian?

I had time on Boxing Day (before anyone else in the house was awake) to read Body Work two or three times, so I eventually sorted out the story. Did anyone else find that the jumps from present to past were a bit confusing? I’m sure that my lack of experience with the graphic format has something to do with it, but with a bit of study I was able to follow the action.

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review 2016-11-18 03:27
A Solid Move Into Comics for Peter Grant
Rivers of London: Body Work - Ben Aaronovitch,Luis Lobo-Guerrero,Lee Sullivan Hill,Andrew Cartmel
The Folly -- Peter Grant and his boss, Inspector Nightingale -- make their way to comics in this collection from Titan Comics. The two are facing a threat right out of a Stephen King novel: a homicidal car.
 
There's more to it, of course, but that's it in essence.  
 
The story was entertaining, and fully captured the feel of the novels (easier with the writer of the books writing these). This seemed slight -- a bit too brief. But it wasn't -- maybe it just flowed so smoothly I didn't notice. Maybe there wasn't that much of a story, I'm not sure. I'm willing to give Aaronovitch and the rest the benefit of the doubt. 
 
The best part of this collection is that it solidified my mental image of Grant, clarified my idea of Molly, and reshaped/corrected my idea of Nightingale. The art wasn't dazzling, but it was good.
 
It didn't blow me away, but it scratched the Peter Grant itch and made me want to read more. If I sound like I'm not totally sold on this, it's because I probably wasn't, but I'm glad I read it and should be reading the next collection in a month or so -- so there's that.
Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2016/11/17/body-work-by-ben-aaronovitch-andrew-cartmel-lee-sullivan
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text 2016-10-01 08:02
Books read (or not!) in September
Rivers of London: Body Work - Ben Aaronovitch,Luis Lobo-Guerrero,Lee Sullivan Hill,Andrew Cartmel
Those Above - Daniel Polansky
An Accident of Stars - Foz Meadows
The Kraken Sea - E. Catherine Tobler
The Obelisk Gate - N.K. Jemisin
Goblin Moon: Mask and Dagger 1 - Teresa Edgerton
Of Sorrow and Such - Angela Slatter
A Case of Possession - K.J. Charles
Night Broken - Patricia Briggs
Dark Horse - Michelle Diener

Books started: 13 (including the 2 I'm currently reading)

Books finished: 11

Books not finished: 1

 

Genre: Pretty much SFF, with one foray into historical m/m where there's magic so that probably still counts as SFF too. 

 

What progress on Mount TBR?: Got a few finished off, added a few... 

 

Book of the month: As you would probably guess, the stand-out book this month for me is The Obelisk Gate. Like its predecessor, one of the best things I've read all year. 

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review 2016-08-21 15:47
Rivers of London: Body Work - Ben Aaronovitch,Luis Lobo-Guerrero,Lee Sullivan Hill,Andrew Cartmel
London Constable Peter Grant discovers something a little unusual while investigating a series of murders: he can see ghosts. Before long, he finds himself apprenticed to Investigator Nightingale ... a wizard. Because he can also do low-level magic.

Think Harry Potter meets Sherlock Holmes, and you've got it.

The title is based on the spirits associated with London's various rivers: Mother and Father Thames, Beverly Brook, Tyburn, Fleet, Oxley and more become actual people whom we meet in the course of the investigation.

The premise is clever, the "whodunnit" took me completely by surprise -- and the clever use of London's theatrical history as a basis for the plot was simply delightful. I'll look forward to reading more of these books.
 
 
 
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