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review 2019-11-13 10:16
Bonjour Tristesse (Hello Unhappiness) by Francoise Sagan, translated by Irene Ash
Bonjour Tristesse - Diane Johnson,Irene Ash,Françoise Sagan

The French Riviera: home to the Beautiful People. And none are more beautiful than Cécile, a precocious seventeen-year-old, and her father Raymond, a vivacious libertine. Charming, decadent and irresponsible, the golden-skinned duo are dedicated to a life of free love, fast cars and hedonistic pleasures. But then, one long, hot summer Raymond decides to marry, and Cécile and her lover Cyril feel compelled to take a hand in his amours, with tragic consequences. Bonjour Tristesse scandalized 1950s France with its portrayal of teenager terrible Cécile, a heroine who rejects conventional notions of love, marriage and responsibility to choose her own sexual freedom.

Goodreads.com

 

 

 

 

 

Seventeen year old Cecile, having recently finished boarding school, celebrates by going on a two month long vacation to a Mediterranean villa with her playboy father, Raymond. Also in attendance is Raymond's favorite lady of the month, Elsa. Raymond is 40 years old, has been widowed for fifteen years, but doesn't let that keep his mood down --- he's changing out love interests every six months or so!

 

The trip also proves to be something of a sexual awakening for young Cecile. Six days into this vacation, she spots Cyril for the first time. Cyril is a young, gorgeous Latin man also in the area for vacation. Cecile admits he's not her usual type --- turns out he's a sensible, responsible, law student AND her own age --- but there's something about him that she just cannot resist. 

 

Later on, we see the arrival of Anna, a longtime family friend who has served as a sort of surrogate mother to Cecile over the years. At first Cecile assumes Anna is only there to join in on family time, but gradually realizes Anna may have a romantic eye set on Raymond. Raymond doesn't seem too bothered with having a little female competition over him to liven up the days! Nor does he seem troubled when Cecile points out the complication of having two women interested in you staying in the same house. If anything, Raymond is amused!

 

He laughed softly and rubbed the back of my neck. I turned to look at him. His dark eyes gleamed; funny little wrinkles marked their edges; his mouth was turned up slightly. He looked like a faun. I laughed with him as I always did when he created complications for himself.

 

"My little partner in crime," he said. "What would I do without you?"

 

His voice was so serious yet so tender that I knew he would really have been unhappy without me. Late into the night we talked of love, of its complications. In my father's eyes they were all imaginary. He refused categorically all ideas of fidelity or serious commitments. He explained that they were arbitrary and sterile. From anyone else such views would have shocked me, but I knew that in his case they did not exclude tenderness and devotion ---- feelings which came all the more easily to him since he was determined that they would be transient.

 

 

 

Cecile likely would've rolled with whatever happened in the house, had Anna not overstepped her bounds regarding Cecile's budding romance with Cyril. Once Anna begins to feel she has a pretty solid in (romatically) with Raymond, she jumps right into full-on new stepmom mode, insisting Cecile drop Cyril and focus more on her educational pursuits. Not impressed with Anna trying to lay down the law all of a sudden, Cecile, in grudge mode, decides to get her father's attention back on Elsa. Plots and ploys ensue and before long this love triangle implodes, leaving one major tragedy in the wake. Elsa's not the brightest bulb, as characters go, but it's hard not to feel a little sorry for her when reality of the situation finally dawns on her.

 

All the elements of a drama were to hand: a libertine, a demimondaine, and a strong-minded woman.

 

This was Sagan's debut novel, published in 1954, when Sagan was barely older than her main character, Cecile! (Sagan passed away in 2004, but google her life story, it's a pretty interesting & layered one!). I'd read that at the time of its release this book had France up in arms over the themes of sexual liberation, particularly involving that of a teenage girl. Reading it now, it must have had to do with the time period because I did not find it all that risque. Yes, sex is mentioned, but it's so gently suggested compared to some of the softcore novels that are out there now, I struggle to see how anyone could take offense to the way the topic of sex is handled in this book. What I did notice is the way Sagan puts her best emo foot forward right from the opening paragraph LOL:

 

A strange melancholy pervades me to which I hesitate to give the grave and beautiful name of sorrow.  The idea of sorrow has always appealed to me, but now I am almost ashamed  of its complete egoism. I have known boredom, regret, and occasionally remorse, but never sorrow. Today it envelops me like a silken web, enervating and soft, and sets me apart from everyone else.

 

While the writing style itself might have a little more finesse than what is commonly seen in YA literature today (especially with remembering that Sagan herself was a teenager when she wrote this novel), it appears the popular themes for the genre haven't changed too much over the decades. In Bonjour Tristesse, we see somewhat overbearing Anna always quietly trying to slip into that stepmom disciplinarian role, not approving of Cecile's choice of boyfriend, pushing for the girl to focus on her studies and future career options instead... Cecile feeling annoyed and stifled, ultimately choosing to rebel against authority, to the point of plotting payback, after her opinion of Anna switches from that of friend to "beautiful serpent" ---- all ideas that can be found in contemporary YA novels. Used to finding a bratty someone to loathe in YA novels of today? Cecile gives you that as well --- anytime anyone remotely tries to hold her accountable for her actions, she gets huffy and storms off like a bored, moody cat. 

 

While it is certainly impressive that Sagan could publish a debut novel at such an early age and find such raving success as a writer right out of the gate, I'm not entirely convinced this is deserving of the level of high praise it seems to have garnered over the years. It's an mildly entertaining story, perfect for a easy, breezy summer day, as the writing has that kind of lazy river flow to it... but in it's entirety, it fell a little flat for me. Seemed like Sagan wanted to go a little bit thriller-ish with the plot but there's just not enough tension built up there. Cecile's sexual awakening is hinted at, but again, she and those scenes are all presented in a "can't be bothered" kind of tone, so if our MCs can't care enough about the direction of their lives, why should we?

 

 

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review 2018-08-14 18:31
Bonjour Tristesse & A Certain Smile
Bonjour Tristesse & A Certain Smile - Françoise Sagan

Bonjour Tristesse & A Certain Smile, both novellas by Sagan have been on my TBR for years, and I am so glad I finally read them. 

There was no particular reason I wanted to read them other than that I heard so many readers speak of them, tho not about them. I was intrigued.

 

I had no idea that Sagan was only 18 when she wrote Bonjour Tristesse, but reading the novella I had been wondering what age group the author was writing for. You see, I didn't connect with the main character. She was quite young mentally and I was wondering if this was a novel that would now be found in the YA/NA section, except the writing is far too accomplished for NA. 

On the other hand, there are far more issues and layers to the stories than I'd probably expect from a YA (never even mind NA...) book. So, even if the novellas fit on either of those shelves - both certainly feature the angsty young people pursuing love interests as their main plot - the novellas are also more than they appear. I'm just not sure, that the reader is given much of a chance to explore the additional issues before the main plots - the romances in both novellas - end.  

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text 2016-03-03 22:20
Books read in January and February
An Untamed State - Roxane Gay
Forbidden - Beverly Jenkins
My Name Is Lucy Barton: A Novel - Elizabeth Strout
The Guest Room: A Novel - Chris Bohjalian
The Reluctant Duchess (Ladies of the Manor) - Roseanna M. White
Bonjour Tristesse & A Certain Smile - Françoise Sagan
I'll See You in Paris: A Novel - Michelle Gable
Playing the Part - Jen Turano

I only read 3 books in January and 5 in February. I'm pleased thus far. I lowered my goal this year to 50 from 100. This year I want to read without pressure. I don't want to choose books based upon size and not content. I don't want to feel pressure with something that is supposed to be an enjoyment for me.

 

 

Standouts

 

An Untamed State

 

My Name Is Lucy Barton

 

 

Honorable Mentions

 

Forbidden

 

I'll See You In Paris

 

 

I'm excited for March and will post my reading intentions.

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review 2015-08-24 23:18
Bonjour tristesse
Bonjour Tristesse - Françoise Sagan

I have actually never read this book in English! ;) But I am looking forward to seeing the way heartbreak translates across cultures and universes...

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review 2015-08-04 21:38
Review: Bonjour Tristesse
Bonjour Tristesse - Diane Johnson,Irene Ash,Françoise Sagan

An odd, precocious little novella that seemed like an ideal summer read: prematurely world-weary French girl thwarts her playboy father’s relationship while on vacation on the Riviera and experiencing her own sexual awakening. Sounds just delightfully melodramatic enough. And it’s short. In some ways it was an ideal summer read, being light on any real morality or repercussions, and capturing a certain rootless (and ruthless) charm. I suppose the one lesson to take away from it is don’t be a spoiled brat.

 

And the narrator-heroine-villain Cecile IS a brat. She does what she wants, when she wants, and no one gets in her way. And yet, at times I did feel a little bad for her. Her father’s decision to marry her deceased mother’s friend Anne Larsen happens-- almost literally--overnight. Immediately Anne begins acting like Cecile’s mother, and in an overbearing way. She means well, but a stepmother (or potential stepmother) can’t simply take over as the mother of a nearly grown teenager and expect no resistance. And Cecile is smart, resourceful, and driven by selfishness- a dangerous combination.

 

There is little outward plot, as most of the book follows Cecile’s thoughts and plans. She has doubts and regrets about what she is doing, but never truly tries to stop herself. Once things are set in motion, they move inexorably towards the tragedy of the ending, but even that feels very remote and rather bloodless. This novel has a very interior, very philosophical and removed way of describing events, which is the kind of stereotypical aloofness that Americans often associate with the French. So in a way, whether it’s true or not, Bonjour Tristesse is a kind of quintessential French novel for those of us who really haven’t read very much French literature.

 

(Cross-posted at Goodreads: Bonjour Tristesse)

 

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