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review 2017-03-02 04:58
Book Review for Coal Regulators MC Book by Chelsea Cameron and Jessie Lane
 
 
 


 
Coal
Regulators MC Romance Book 
by Chelsea Cameron and Jessie Lane
 4 stars
 
Reviewed by: Angels
Format:Kindle
Published: Whiskey Girls Publishing 
Source: ARC
Genre:  MC Romance,Romance,Erotica,
Bad Boys
 

Blurb

She is the everyday girl next-door.

He is shadowed by regret laced in broken memories.

Dark sins of the past have a way of taking hold of your heart and never letting go.

Paisley Asher is the average woman trying to get by in life. Happy and safe in her bubble of ease, she is not prepared to take on the black pit that is one man’s heart.

Trevor ‘Coal’ Blake has a past covered in black. Tainted. He is a dark soul.

In the moment, it is easy to lose sight of what is going on. Looking back, however, little cues were misread … or were they? He lives with more questions than answers.

Chance encounters bring these two together. Is she the angel to pull him from the depths of his personal hell, or is he destined to remain alone and as black as coal?


 
 


Our Review 

Coal and Paisley !

Lets start off by saying this is new author to us and we enjoyed reading their latest installment in their MC Romance series.I loved reading MC Romances so we are always looking to add to our current book collection.

I did enjoy this story.I found the characters to be like-able as well as engaging.The story dabbles in the current problems arising in the MC and how the members are dealing with them.Each member's different personality blended into the story making it a fun read.Although I liked the two main characters a lot Pixie ( Paisley's nick name) and Coal I just couldn't imagine them as a couple.There was a lot of things that I liked about each character but, they were total opposites .I like a story when the character's are totally different and they seem to make it work and sometimes it even works to their advantage.Pixie is a Vegan and lives a clean life in mind and spirit as well as health.She needs balance in her life just to focus and to be happy.Coal is tall dark dangerous as well as having a troubled past. He lives life on the edge and is in danger because of the life he leads yet he is attracted to a sweet an innocent. His polar opposite.I just couldn't see a relationship going anywhere for this couple from the very beginning.

I loved how Paisley was always happy upbeat and determined.She was kind and quite love-able.I liked how she was with her friends who were also her polar opposite but seem to make their friendships work.I like how she was willing to take chances within reason.She was just an adorable character who just tried to make all those around her happy as well.I loved that about her.I also loved how she was always giving herself pep talks they made me laugh.

I loved Coal with his good deeds.I loved how he took his troubled past and tried to make a difference to those women in need. I love how he loved his friends and the loyalty he showed them.I enjoyed seeing him squirm fighting his attraction toward Paisley.It was too funny .I chuckled more then once.I loved how Trevor's (Coal) reasons for not getting involved with Pixie had nothing to do with her lifestyle choices they were personal ones.Coal even started eating slightly better by being with Paisley.It happened gradually without him even realizing he was making better choices in general.I loved that omg moment when he realizes he was giving up meat! Too funny!

This was a light fun read.I enjoyed getting to know the character's and I am looking forward to picking up the other stories in its series.I enjoy the other character's as well their different personalties blended into the story adding humor to it.

Although this couple had chemistry It lacked heat and fire.I missed the sizzle I guess you could say that this couple could have brought to the pages.Paisley would have been a willing partner in that area. She was a tad adventurous ...

We are giving this story 4 stars.I am hoping to read more of these authors stories in this series in the near future and get to know the rest of the character's and their stories.

ARC provided by author for an honest review.
 
 
 
 
Other books in this series Amazon Links!
 
 
 
 
USA Today Bestselling author Chelsea Camaron is a small town Carolina girl with a big imagination. She is a wife and mom chasing her dreams. She writes contemporary romance, erotic suspense, and psychological thrillers. She loves to write blue-collar men who have real problems with a fictional twist. From mechanics to bikers to oil riggers to smoke jumpers, bar owners, and beyond, she loves a strong hero who works hard and plays harder.
 
 

About Author

 

Jessie Lane is a best-selling author of Paranormal and Contemporary Romance, as well as, Upper YA Paranormal Romance/Fantasy.

She lives in Kentucky with her two little Rock Chicks in-the-making and her over protective alpha husband that she’s pretty sure is a latent grizzly bear shifter. She has a passionate love for reading and writing naughty romance, cliff hanging suspense, and out-of-this-world characters that demand your attention, or threaten to slap you around until you do pay attention to them.

She’s also a proud member of the Romance Writers of America (RWA).

To be notified about new releases you can sign up for her Newsletter at: www.jessielane.news

Please visit Jessie at: http://jessielanebooks.com/ for more information!
 
You may find us here !




 
 
 


 
 
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review 2017-03-01 11:49
Book Review For Mayhem Alexis Noelle
 
 


 
Mayhem
Deathstalkers MC Book #2
by Alexis Noelle
 stars
 
Reviewed by: Angels
Format:Kindle
Published: Alexis Noelle & Amazon Digital
Source: ARC
Genre:  MC Romance,Romance,Erotica,
Bad Boys
 

Blurb


I had to step up, take over,
Save her from herself,
From him.
He doesn't deserve her.
But I sure as Hell don't either


She's too sweet, too soft, too kind.
A broken shell of the woman she once was.
But now, there's more on the line,
She's in too deep.
And I'll be damned if I ever give up
On putting her back together,
Piece-by-piece,
Owning every ounce of the woman,

Who stole my heart.
 

Our Review


Cutter and Jaz's story !

Let me start off by saying that I absolutely love this author's stories in this series.I throughly enjoyed this latest release Mayhem.This series has been on my top favorite reads list for 2017.

In this latest installment is yet another heart wrenching read that tugs at your heart strings.The story had your heart pounding,heart breaking and ready to shred tears for Jasmine at a moments notice.This story is not for the light hearted it includes abuse ,rape, and graphic situations including sex.

I normally pick a favorite character in a story and mine is going to be Cutter but, Jasmine is right up there with Cutter.I picked Cutter because he is highly dangerous.His name stands for the deeds he has done and is highly skilled at.I chose him because he goes against his own beliefs on how women should be treated and acts the dominate .Cutter needs to dominate Jasmine in order to help her deal.Cutter takes charge and demands things of Jasmines rules and orders her about only giving her small choices to make each day.My heart breaks for Cutter in no way does he want to treat Jasmine like her husband and like a slave but he has no choice if he wants her to heal. At this moment is when I fell in love with Cutter's character sigh..

Cutter is a complicated guy and he is a highly dangerous man.He got his Nickname from being good at his craft.Men fear him just by whispering his name yet we saw a totally different side of him when dealing with Jasmine.When it came to his interactions with Jasmine we found him to be protective ,kind,and love-able.When Cutter meets Jasmine both their lives change for the better.Act of fate perhaps?Its amazing to see the changes that we saw in Cutter's character as he started to care and fall in love with Jasmine.Jasmine brought out emotions in Cutter that lay dormant but now his emotions come to the surface.We see him actually feel something instead of pain and unhappiness.I enjoyed seeing him find some happiness it made my heart glad.

Jasmine's character showed the most emotional growth throughout this story. Jaz amazed me at the things that she was able to overcome.We watched a shell of a women blossom throughout the pages.My heart broke for Jasmine as I felt her emotional pain .Jaz 's pain was so heart wrenching it made you want to cry.I shred a few tears for her myself. All it took was for someone to believe in her and we finally saw just how strong she was.I was rooting from the first few pages that this amazing women would find herself again as well find a little bit of love and happiness .

I have to say that I loved all the character's except Dylan.I loved their kindness,humor, protectiveness when it came to Jaz.I loved seeing them build lasting relationships along with friendships that helped her in her healing process.I loved seeing her find a bit of happiness that she deserved.I love seeing all the past character's grace the pages in this newest story.I loved seeing what they were all up to now.They added those special moments to enrich this story and make it quite the page turner.I love the old Ladies and how protective they are and are just as dangerous as their men are when it comes to protecting the ones they love.

Another fantastic read.The story was filled with pain and suffering along with love and happiness.We saw growth and changes in both characters.We also saw a couple heal just by being with one another and both healing from past hurts.I love a story that keeps you engrossed in its pages and this story did just that.The author did an amazing job creating a character so like Dylan with Cutter but his personality worked in a positive effect instead of a negative one.I love when you can connect with the characters you read about and be invested and connected to them which I was able to do with the characters in this story.

Favorite Scene:

Jasmine and Cutters interaction in the kitchen regarding lunch after Lucy's talk with Jaz.It was one of the most touching moments in this entire story.This scene made me fall head of heals for Cutter.

One of th biggest surprises of the story is how opposites attract and how it worked to this couples advantage.The difference's in Jasmine and Cutter's personalities just made you love this couple even more.Another winner for us a 5 star read.A recommended read to all those MC Romance lovers.I also recommend you read all the others in its series as well.Another amazing read....
 
 
 
 
Click the covers to bring you to our other reviews in this series !
 
 
 
 
Other books in this series will bring you to Amazon!
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

About Author

 

I love reading romance books! I feel like being able to lose yourself in a book in one of the more exciting aspects. The books I love to read and write will be ones that make you feel for the characters. You should have an opinion on every character in a book. Whether you love them, hate them, or think they are up to something.

I live in Philadelphia Pennsylvania with my husband, two kids, and two dogs. On top of starting a writing career I am a full time student, and a full time mom. I love spending time with my kids, although I have to hide the computer from them when I am writing! I love being active and being able to do any activity outdoors.

I have always thought as an author the most important critic is your reader, so I would love to hear from you. If you read the book and loved it or hated it, tell me. As long as it is in a constructive way I will always answer and interact with you. I want fans to feel free to tell me what they want for the characters in the story and what they want to see happen.
 
You may find us here !


 



 

 
 
 


 
 
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review 2017-02-12 21:39
Chelsea Chelsea Bang Bang - Chelsea Handler

book was pretty good, but some boring parts. 3 stars

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review 2017-01-31 09:21
The 'horror' was in very small quantities
Scared: Ten Tales of Horror - Rayne Hall,Deborah J. Ross,Jonathan Broughton,Karen Heard,Pamela Turner,Liv Rancourt,William Meikle,Tracie McBride,Grayson Bray Morris,Donna Johnson,Rayne Wheeler,Deborah Wheeler

Overall this collection of stories only made up approx 70% of the book (the rest was dedicated to promotion of the author's other works) and left quite a bit to be desired. There weren't really any creepy stories here, and the 'horror' was in very small quantities.

My favourite story by quite a way was 'Death comes for Maggie McDaniel' because of the haunting sadness and the fact that it was a well written and interesting tale. I would definitely read more by Grayson Bray Morris, Pamela Turner, Donna Johnson and William Meikle. The rest I probably wouldn't bother.

I feel that the four best stories are dragged down a bit by the others that get a nudge into the realm of good because they're being carried by the four better stories. Not a great collection, but an OK way to spend a couple of hours if you want a not very scary collection of stories.

Story specific thoughts below:

Out of Order - 3 stars
This one has a single horrible animal scene, which is written off in one or two lines. The horror aspects were not a problem, a bit simple, like a child witnessing a murder, too simplistic to be very impactful. A shame really because the idea is interesting.

Our lady of the toads - 3 stars
Witches tale that reads quickly but doesn't really offer anything new. Not a bad read, but a touch boring.

Family Heirloom - 4 stars
An interesting idea, but the story was over too quickly. I'd have liked to see the story teased out a bit more.

Ring of stones - 4 stars
A really short tale rich with imagery and sensory information. But a glimpse, captivating.

Death comes for Maggie McDaniel - 4.5 stars
A sad tale, full of character and loss. I only wish it were a touch longer so the blow to guts had the impact it deserves. Lovely writing.

Creatures of the night - 4 stars
The creepiest story so far tied in with the character being a writer so it's an instant win for me. The pace is quick, detail light but enough to paint a picture.

Druid stones - 2.5 stars
The story gallops along to its own tune, the ending obvious from a mile off. A lot of flowery wording that could be cut to make the story stronger.

The Loft - 2 stars
Rather boring, even what should have been tense moments lacked any sort of urgency. Repetition and an annoying MC made for an uninteresting or engaging story.

Life in miniature - 3.5 stars
A great idea, but over far too quickly. This should have been teased out, hints dropped etc. Who is Susan? Who is Michael? A little more character behind them would make this a great story.

You have one message - 3 stars
Probably the creepiest only because of the unknown factor and the panic written on the characters faces. The story offered little by way of characterization, but for once this worked because it allowed the faceless masses to form and show mass hysteria even in a small window of opportunity with limited character visibility. Still, there were too many unanswered questions and not enough content to really make this stand on its own.

**Note: I won an electronic copy of this book through the Booklikes giveaway program**

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review 2017-01-25 20:36
Review: The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. LeGuin
The Left Hand of Darkness - Ursula K. Le Guin

Though I last read The Left Hand of Darkness some fifteen years ago, it had been on my mind frequently as my first North Dakota winter got underway. As the temperature plummeted to -20°F (feeling even colder with the wind rushing down from the icy north), as the snow piled up in feet, as a simple walk from my car to the grocery store became a race against frostbitten fingers, all I could think about was Genly Ai and Lord Estraven, trekking across the glacier in LeGuin’s most famous novel.

 

I had already been planning to focus on rereads in 2017. As my nation, as the world, veers drunkenly into ominous and uncharted new dimensions, I’ve been craving the comfort of reading stories whose endings are known, whose dangers have been mapped and rendered tame. But I had forgotten how The Left Hand of Darkness actually ends.

 

It begins in the capital city Erhenrang, in the nation Karhide, on a planet called Gethen or, more descriptively, Winter. Genly Ai, originally from Earth, has been sent with a mission to invite the Gethenians to join the Ekumen, a galactic alliance of human societies. He comes alone, as Ekumenical Envoys always do, so as not to frighten or antagonize his hosts (“One alien is a curiosity, two are an invasion,” he explains.) But, as probably should be expected when inserting oneself into the political sphere of any human nation, Ai soon becomes a tool of multiple factions both within and without Karhide – and none, it seems, have much interest in prostrating themselves before some mythical League of Nations from beyond the stars.

 

When the Karhidish government, nominally a monarchy but actually a loose federation of diverse tribal groups, falls under the spell of a Trumpian demagogue with unity on his lips and war on his mind, Ai decides to leave Erhenrang and try his luck with Karhide’s major rival. The country of Orgoreyn runs a tight Soviet-style ship; their national motto is “papers please!”, and their secret police love nothing more than to send dissidents and deviants off to the Voluntary Farms, which aren’t exactly farms and certainly aren’t voluntary. It isn’t long before Ai finds himself on the wrong side of the wrong people, and throughout the second half of the book, must escape from a labor camp on foot, across a continent-wide glacier in the dead of winter on a planet so frigid it is named after the ice. His savior and only companion on this expedition is a person named Estraven, the disgraced former Prime Minister of Karhide, who had been exiled as a traitor. S/he is, perhaps, the only truly honorable person on Gethen – certainly the only one Ai ever meets (though, hanging around politicians, I suppose he’s lucky he met even one…)

 

The book, narrated primarily by Ai, refers to Estraven with male pronouns, but this is something I won’t do in my review. Because Estraven is neither man nor woman. Though “typical” humans in every other way, all Gethenians are androgynes, spending the majority of their lives in a sexless state. Once a month, they enter a period called “kemmer” (heat, rut, estrus), where they, upon finding a partner, take on the characteristics of one or the other sex. In this way, the same individual may be father to one child, mother to another. Genly’s permanent maleness is seen as a perversion by them – being always sexually responsive, how do his people ever get anything done?

 

It is the gender politics of Gethen – or, really, the lack thereof – that have made The Left Hand of Darkness a classic of feminist science fiction. To me, though, it feels odd to read a “feminist” book where every single character is referred to as “he”. One of things I remember about reading this the first time is how much this bothered me, the consistent use of masculine pronouns. The Ekumen’s (and LeGuin’s?) excuse for writing this way is as follows: “Lacking the Karhidish ‘human pronoun’ used for persons in somer [the sexually inactive state], I must say ‘he,’ for the same reasons as we used the masculine pronoun in referring to a transcendent god: it is less defined, less specific, than the neuter or the feminine.” And to this I say: bullshit. Masculine pronouns are certainly “defined”, in that if you refer to a person as “he”, I will picture a man. It’s incredibly difficult to train the brain not to. The narrator even acknowledges this, saying: “But the very use of the pronoun in my thoughts leads me continually to forget that the Karhider I am with is not a man, but a manwoman.”

 

I am not quite sure what to make of LeGuin’s intent here. Although inventing or appropriating a gender-neutral pronoun could potentially be jarring or break the flow of narration, I think it should be a bit jarring to read about a civilization of complete neuters, where we as readers can’t automatically slot any character into one of the two most basic categories we understand: man or woman. In fact, I don’t think it’s even necessary to use a gender-neutral pronoun to do this, as Ann Leckie demonstrated ingeniously in her Ancillary Justice series, where everyone is referred to as “she”. There, though the characters aren’t androgynes, gender is considered irrelevant in the narrator’s culture, and the use of “she” forced me every time it was used to consider that the character in question may identify as male, or female, or neither, and the lack of confirmation was both jarring and refreshing. (It also led to some humorous reviews, where careless readers scoffed at this “society full of lesbians”…)

 

The first time I read The Left Hand of Darkness, I wrote this all off as LeGuin being unintentionally sexist. I figured, this book was written in the 60’s; maybe just the idea of an androgynous culture was considered radical, and who cared whether they were all called “he” – it was just language, after all. But rereading the book now, I think LeGuin was being subtler than that. The entire novel is infused with Genly Ai’s point of view – even when Gethenians are narrating, Ai is translating. And Ai is a man from Earth, a very 1960’s-ish Earth from what we can tell. It no longer seems to me that LeGuin couldn’t handle gender-neutrality well; rather, Genly Ai can’t.

 

Ai’s sexism is subtle, but it is definitely there, and as I read through the book this time, examples started to jump out at me. The powerful political leaders that Ai spends most of his time with are referred to as men exclusively, with little thought or cognitive dissonance. It is only when Ai begins to meet downtrodden Gethenians, such as the other inmates at the labor camp, that they begin to seem feminine to him – and always in a negative way. “Among my fellowprisoners I had for the first time on Winter a certain feeling of being a man among women, or among eunuchs. The prisoners had that same flabbiness and coarseness. They were hard to tell apart; their emotional tone seemed always low, their talk trivial.” He speaks later of their “gross, bland fleshiness, a bovinity without point or edge.” When Gethenians lose power and prestige, when they lose their very freedom, suddenly they seem womanly to Ai. Later, when Estraven explains why, though s/he loves Karhide, s/he is not a patriot, Ai is again disgusted: “There was in this attitude something feminine, a refusal of the abstract, the ideal, a submissiveness to the given, which rather displeased me.” Again and again, when Ai encounters any traits in a Gethenian that are not associated with virility, aggressiveness, or authority, he is suddenly reminded that the person before him is not a man, but something lesser, something a bit vulgar. Something feminine.

 

Ai is not really an unreliable narrator, in the sense of being a liar or a madman, but his biases are insidious, threaded throughout the novel and rarely drawing attention to themselves. It is not that Ai hates women; like many men, he has just not thought much about gender politics. When asked by Estraven, who has never met a woman, whether they are inferior to men, Ai has trouble responding. “No. Yes. No, of course not, not really. But the difference is very important. I suppose the most important thing, the heaviest single factor in one’s life, is whether one’s born male or female.” He’s hardly a misogynist; it’s just that a gender studies class would probably do him good. As a character Ai is likable, but he is probably not the ideal individual to lead the reader on this anthropological journey through Gethen. And that is, I think, the point.

 

One of the themes in this book is cultural misunderstanding – how the same action or trait can be seen in contradictory ways by different civilizations. As this idea is a staple of virtually every first-contact or anthropological science fiction story, I tend to take it for granted by now, but I like how it’s handled here. On their trek across the ice, Estraven and Ai begin to understand each other in ways they never had before; they become friends, and even begin to love each other (in a strictly platonic way, Ai hastens to point out – sex with a Gethenian would just be too weird for him). But they also recognize the ways in which they are too different, too alien, to fully comprehend each other. And they leave it at that. I love Ai’s dawning understanding toward the end of the novel:

 

“I thought it was for your sake that I came alone, so obviously alone, so vulnerable, that I could in myself pose no threat, change no balance: not an invasion, but a mere messenger-boy. But there’s more to it than that. Alone, I cannot change your world. But I can be changed by it. Alone, I must listen, as well as speak. Alone, the relationship I finally make, if I make one, is not impersonal and not only political: it is individual, it is personal, it is both more and less than political. Not We and They; not I and It; but I and Thou.”

 

This duality, between I and Thou, relates to the title of the novel, which comes from a Gethenian poem: “Light is the left hand of darkness / and darkness the right hand of light. / Two are one...” Ai thinks that Gethenians are obsessed with the unity of all things because they are sexually undivided; other humans, separated into men and women, are therefore obsessed with duality. But Estraven disagrees: “Duality is an essential, isn’t it? So long as there is myself and the other.”

 

I’m not sure where to leave this review, other than at that. This book is a classic, and deservedly so. The ending broke my heart in a way I was completely not expecting – how could I remember so many specific plot points from reading this so long ago, but forget how shattering it is in the end? But I was a different person then, and the world was a different place.

 

Speaking of the world, maybe in the end I can take heart in the quick and absolute downfall of Tibe, the Karhidish Donald Trump. I can take heart in the prevention of total war between Karhide and Orgoreyn. I can take heart in people like Estraven, who love their homelands but are resolutely unpatriotic, who would be happy to serve a good government if they ever could identify one. Maybe there’s hope for us too. Maybe it won’t even require the intervention of a galactic civilization, to remind us how small we really are.

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