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review 2018-04-26 01:28
Rock Star Baby (Bad Oak Boys, #1) by Erin M. Leaf Review
Rock Star Baby - Erin M. Leaf

Ryan Oakley, lead singer of Bad Oak and heartthrob extraordinaire, isn’t looking for a girlfriend. He’s definitely not looking for a boyfriend, but after the explosive encounter he has with a guy he meets backstage, he realizes he’s more flexisexual than he’d thought. Of course, suddenly being able to shift into a wolf is an unexpected side effect he didn’t expect and can barely control.

Bardulf Forst is Alpha-Heir to his pack, but he can’t resist his little sister when she begs him to meet Ryan Oakley. When he realizes the sexy singer is his mate, he can’t deny instinct. He claims the famous rock star even though he knows his father won’t approve: heirs are supposed to have children and two males can’t reproduce.

Little do they know that they’re about to experience an ancient shifter biological imperative: when two male Alphas mate, unexpected miracles sometimes happen.

 

Review

 

I keep trying MPREG romance. I have yet to find one that has good enough world building to make me happy.

This one did not and the the couple spent too much time apart for me to be happy.

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review 2018-04-13 18:06
Boy's Life Review
Boy's Life - Robert R. McCammon

Source: Library

 

This book. This book. Sometimes you come away from a book, and you can’t even describe how you feel about it. You didn’t just read it, you experienced it. Boy’s Life is one of those books. I had highlights in basically every chapter. I fell in love with the characters, with the town. So I decided to let some of the quotes lead the way in my review.

“Oh, yes, the shelves. The troves of treasure. On those shelves are stacks of me:”

When you run into a quote like that almost right off the bat, a connection is forged. You identify so strongly in that moment with the protagonist that no matter what happens, you know you’ll always love them at least a little bit.

 

And I did. I loved Cory a little bit, and maybe more than that. I loved him because I saw myself in him. Because I thought he seemed to get it. And he did.

“In the real world I had no power; in my world I was Hercules unchained.”

Imagination is a powerful thing. Something Robert McCammon proves time and time again during the course of Boy’s Life. The magical realism aspect is so well written that it’s legitimately hard to tell the difference between fact and fiction. I still don’t know. I don’t think I want to know, honestly. Boy’s Life isn’t a book meant to be studied. It’s meant to be savored, to be loved.

“If she could imagine events through to their worst tragedy, then she seemed to have some kind of control over them.”

But it wasn’t just Cory that I had an affection for. I understood his mom. I’ve worried things over endlessly, thinking them to their worst, getting myself all worked up. I can’t help it, that’s just how I am. But I could never put it into words as well as McCammon did. In that moment, with that line, Cory’s mom became real to me.

 

His dad, though, I think was the father I always wanted. Kind, gentle, and good-spirited even though he grew up in conditions that didn’t exactly lend themselves to that type of character. I worried about him as soon as it was obvious he was having problems. I kept hoping that nothing happened to him. I needed the author to not turn this man horrible. I wanted to reach into the pages and talk to him. To let him know that it would be okay. That he would be okay. No matter what else happened in the novel, I needed Cory’s dad to be okay. He wasn’t perfect, but yet he actually was. I loved him.

“I was never afraid of my monsters. I controlled them.”

Ah, Cory, sweet child. How I see you in me and me in you. So many people don’t understand the appeal of reading horror, especially when you’ve had a particularly crappy life. But horror fiction is exactly that: fiction. It’s a horror we can have control over, whether its by finishing the story, refusing to finish the story, or imagining our own adventures with the monster. It’s a beautiful thing that has saved my sanity more than once – that ability to control my monsters.

“I never knew what hate really was until I thought of somebody wrapping up a bomb and putting in a church on Sunday morning to kill little girls.”

This line in Boy’s Life hit me particularly hard. I don’t know why. I think maybe I cherished Cory’s innocent so much that at this point finding that innocence to be partially stripped away just hurt. I hurt for him, I hurt for that moment in every child’s life when they finally learn what hate really is.

“Traveling, traveling, with planets and stars beyond and invitation books open to a single name. The solitary traveler has left this world. He will not pass this way again.”

This one came close to delivering a knock-out blow for me. I was already sad because of what had been happening, but this line stole the breath from my body. It’s a version of what I told my daughter when her sister passed away. I had told her “She’s traveling now, the atoms of her… kissing Jupiter, playing in Saturn’s rings.”  So, to see this in Boy’s Life, it was real life sorrow mixing with fictional sorrow, and it was heartache and heartbreak old and new all mixed together.

 

Boy’s Life is one of the best books I’ve ever read. It felt as close to perfect as a book can get. I think in almost anyone else’s hands this story would have bored me to tears. But McCammon brought it to life in a way that must be personally experienced. This was absolutely gorgeous prose, and that so rarely happens that I think I shall forever treasure it. I went into this book with the full expectation that I would hate it. The synopsis looked boring and I had just finished Stinger which I didn’t care much at all. I only agreed to read Boy’s Life with a few partners as a buddy read. But even going up against the weight of my negative expectations, McCammon managed to deliver a story that slapped some magic back into me.

 

Boy’s Life isn’t horror, and it isn’t action-packed, and there’s very little of what I tend to like in it… and yet I absolutely loved this book.

 

Absolutely a must-read folks.

Source: www.scifiandscary.com/boys-life-review
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text 2018-04-13 07:10
Blog Tour - Never Been Good

 

About the Book:

 

Never Been Good
by Christi Barth

Series: Bad Boys Gone Good #2

Genre: Adult, Contemporary Romance

Publisher: Avon Impulse

Publication Date: April 3, 2018

 

 

 

 

Flynn Maguire isn’t really a bad guy. Sure, he worked for the mob, but he ran a legitimate business—on paper anyway—and it paid enough to keep his brother out of the lifestyle. Until they turned on him. Now he’s stuck in Witness Protection, tending bar in Nowheresville Oregon… and pissed the life he knew is gone.

 

The only bright spot? Fantasizing about his quiet, secretive, beautiful coworker.

 

Sierra Williams is a woman on the run. All she wants now is to settle into small town life… and ignore the brooding, sexy bartender who can’t seem to take his eyes off her. Flynn’s bad-boy vibe pushes all her buttons, but Sierra fell for the wrong man once already. She can’t afford to let her guard down again. Except Flynn’s tough exterior is slowly melting away to reveal the sweet man beneath and their attraction is too strong to resist.

 

Sierra and Flynn are falling fast, but they’re both keeping so many secrets. The truth could ruin everything… unless a girl who’s a little bad is perfect for a guy who’s never really been good.

 

 

Amazon  |  Avon Romance  |  Barnes & Noble  |  Google Play  |  iBooks

 

Tour Wide Giveaway:

 

To celebrate the release of NEVER BEEN GOOD, we’re giving away two paperback copies of BAD FOR HER by Christi Barth!

 

GIVEAWAY TERMS & CONDITIONS:  Open to US shipping addresses only. Two winners will each receive a paperback copy of Bad For Her by Christi Barth.  This giveaway is administered by Pure Textuality PR on behalf of Avon Romance.  Giveaway ends 4/16/2018 @ 11:59pm EST. Avon Romance will send the winning copies out to the winner directly. Limit one entry per reader and mailing address.  Duplicates will be deleted.  CLICK HERE TO ENTER!

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Christi Barth:

USA Today bestseller Christi Barth earned a Masters degree in vocal performance and embarked upon a career on the stage. A love of romance then drew her to wedding planning. Ultimately she succumbed to her lifelong love of books and now writes award-winning contemporary romance.

 

Christi can always be found either whipping up gourmet meals (for fun, honest!) or with her nose in a book. She lives in Maryland with the best husband in the world.

 

Christi’s Links:

 website facebook twitter goodreads Amazon icon

 

 

 

 

 

This promotion is brought to you by Pure Textuality PR.
PTPR New Logo - Email 2

 

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review 2018-04-05 17:03
A blunt account of what the "Good War" was really like
The Boys' Crusade: The American Infantry in Northwestern Europe 1944-45 - Paul Fussell

Paul Fussell’s book is an unusual contribution to the Modern Library Chronicles series.  Whereas most volumes provide short introductions to their respective subjects, as other reviewers have noted, this is not a straightforward military history of the war with Germany.  Instead, Fussell offers a much more idiosyncratic work, a social and cultural history of the American riflemen who fought in northwestern Europe after Normandy.

 

This is not to say that this book isn’t worth reading – quite the contrary.  Throughout this book, Fussell dispels much of the “greatest generation” mythology cultivated in recent years by writers such as Stephen Ambrose.  A veteran of the war, Fussell provides a much more complicated portrait of inexperienced young boys thrown into the chaos and violence of combat.  In a series of short chapters, he covers topics ranging from the interactions with the French to the treatment of the wounded and the dead to the discovery of the work camps – all of which he addresses with the same blunt and insightful analysis that is a hallmark of his work.  Anyone seeking to get a more accurate portrait of what the “good war” was really like for the men who fought in it would do well to start here.

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review 2018-04-01 14:28
A great crossover
His to Protect: A Bachelor Bad Boys/Mast... His to Protect: A Bachelor Bad Boys/Masters and Mercenaries Novella - Carly Phillips,Lexi Blake

This was a terrific read. I could not put it down. It was fast moving and the characters were interesting and had a great backstory. Talia is a scientist for a pharmaceutical company that she found a breakthrough medication that others don’t want her to have so she needs protection which brings her bac to Shane, her brothers best friend and her crush from their childhood, who is a bodyguard for McKay-Tagart. When they go on the run they find out they both still have chemistry and both decide to just have what time they have together. But somehow whoever is after Talia they keep finding them. There is always something being going on in this book. Thee was so many twists and turns and the ending was great. Carly Phillips did not disappoint in this book. I highly recommend this read.

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