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review 2014-02-01 00:00
Broken City
Broken City - Brian Azzarello About halfway through Broken City, I realized I was reading it in a Max Payne voice. That's because Batman's running monologue is very typical noir, seemingly copy/pasted from a Max Payne game script. Testosterone-infused Batman isn't my favorite take on the character, he's mostly just getting angry at everyone and beating the crap out of them in between rambling about how God doesn't care about Gotham. Aside from appearances by Penguin, Scarface, and Joker, the story's not too exciting or groundbreaking. The art here far outshines the writing.
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text 2013-11-29 11:29
Broken Truce: The Finished Cover!!!

So here it is at last!!!

 

The cover for the next book in my Broken City series: Broken Truce!!!
 
 
I would love to hear your thoughts (and/or questions!) on the cover! I'm hoping those of you who have read Broken City will be intrigued.  ;-P 
 
Broken Truce has taken me by surprise, I think it's quite different from the first book in the series; not so hopeful, a bit darker and you see the City from more peoples points of view. Deeta has grown up a lot, and she's wiser than before.

I've had soooo much fun with the characters in this book. Yes, Deeta and Tom remain the focus of the story, but they share the limelight with Tom's brothers, most especially Jayden. (For those of you who don't remember who Jayden is: he's the twin that Nova tipped orange juice over in Broken City.) You really get to know Jayden in this book, his faults as well as his strengths, he's very much a fish out of water. I really enjoyed writing him, he has such an attitude on him, but at the same time you can't help liking him (I hope!)

I had a blast with some of the secondary characters this time round as well, the first story is quite insular, focused the the group of people that Deeta loves and cares about most. Broken Truce introduces you to a lot of new characters, some good and some bad.

These side characters were some of my favourites to write; Ian, a scout from the Brownly tribe, Julian, Max, Ned and Linus, I can't really tell you who these are without being too spoilerish, but they were sooooo much fun! Wren, Falcon, Raven and Kestral, siblings from a tribe known as The Birds, and so much more!

I'm hoping to knuckle down and have the manuscript ready to go live in January...

Contributions to the cause in the form of brownies and fluffy pillows are very much appreciated! ;-P


DeeDee.
 
D.D. Chant
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review 2013-09-12 22:43
A City Tossed and Broken by Judy Blundell
A City Tossed and Broken: The Diary of Minnie Bonner, San Francisco, California, 1906 - Judy Blundell

A copy of this book was provided via Netgalley for the purpose of review.

 

Dear America is a middle grade series from Scholastic that explores in diary form the lives of young women and girls at important points in United States history. In A City Tossed and Broken, the young woman in question is Minnie Bonner, a young woman who is forced to take a position as a maid after her father gambles away almost everything the family owns. But when her employers are killed in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, Minnie faces dual dilemmas; as she grapples with the moral dilemma of using a young woman's death to her advantage, she must escape the flames that are consuming San Francisco.

All in all, A City Tossed and Broken is both a reasonably educational glimpse at a historical disaster and an entertaining story that manages to be extraordinary without breaking one's suspension of disbelief, and its fourteen-year-old female protagonist is both clever and competent in the face of extreme circumstances. After the epilogue of Minnie's story, there is also a helpful section that elaborates on the historical disaster and features photographs of the damage done to the city.

I'd recommend the book to fans of MG and historical fiction, especially those with an interest in natural disasters and/or San Francisco. For children with an interest in natural disasters and/or San Francisco who can't yet handle a book this size, I would recommend checking out Earthquake in the Early Morningby Mary Pope Osborne; for those interested in a nonfiction take on the 1906 disaster, I'd recommend theStuff You Missed in History Class podcast's 2011 episode, History's Unforgettable Fires

And I will definitely be reading more of the Dear America series in the future.

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review 2013-02-01 00:00
A City of Broken Glass - Rebecca Cantrell A City of Broken Glass is a story set in 1938 in Berlin. Adelheid Zinsli is a Swiss journalist sent to Poland to write a lifestyle piece on the Saint Martin festival. While there, though, she hears about twelve thousand Jews deported from Germany, and knows she has to get the story. Which she does, before she’s arrested by the Gestapo and brought back to Germany in the trunk of a car…As she leaves her twelve-year-old son Anton and her former lover Lars in Poland, Adelheid must stay calm and plan an escape — she faces certain death once she gets back to Berlin. Because Adelheid Zinsli is really Hannah Vogel, who made herself persona non grata in Germany before she last left Berlin…And so begins this gripping tale of betrayal, forgiveness, and reconciliation set during one of the scariest times in our current history — especially for those the Germans have marked as impure. Of course, Hannah escapes the Gestapo, with the surprising help of Lars and Anton. But once in Berlin, she discovers that the situation is way more dire than imagined — especially when she realizes that she’s the target of a personal vendetta. The question is, by whom — and why? Ok, so that’s two questions.A City of Broken Glass is tense and taut, and manages to suck you under a spell weaved with expert story-telling and memorable characters. Hannah is strong and stubborn and independent, yet doesn’t hesitate to accept help when she needs it. Anton is so very mature for twelve — understandable, considering all that he goes through in this book. And Lars. He’s been through so much, and could’ve reconciled with Hannah sooner if he’d only have overcome his own pride. And all around them, the heartache and heartbreak of loss — loss of lives and loves, loss of freedom, loss of identity, loss of trust. Can they make it out of Berlin before it’s too late? Or will these three be added to the ever-increasing numbers of the casualties of the Germans’ cleansing?I enjoyed this so much I’m looking up the previous three Hannah Vogel books to add to my TBR pile.drey’s rating: Excellent!
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