logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Camille
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-12 08:53
Voodoo Butterfly (Voodoo Butterfly #1) by Camille Faye
Voodoo Butterfly (Voodoo Butterfly #1) - Camille Faye

Voodoo Butterfly is the first book in the Voodoo Butterfly series, and from the start you can tell that research has been done for this story. Sophia is alone in the world, or at least she thinks she is. Her mother moved away from New Orleans, and told Sophia everyone was dead. However, after her mother's death, Sophia finds out that her grandmother had been alive, but no longer. She is told she has inherited half of a shop, and goes to the funeral to pay her last respects to a woman she never knew about.

 

This is a gripping and interesting story, with many facets to keep your attention. It is well written, with plenty of character development throughout. And come on, admit it, if you were handed a voodoo shop in New Orleans, you'd be sceptical too! I loved the interaction between all the characters, although I was unsure of just what Jacques was playing at. 

 

There were no editing or grammatical errors that disrupted my reading flow, and I definitely would like to continue with this series. A fantastic start that leaves you wanting more. Absolutely recommended by me.

 

* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *

 

Merissa

Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

 

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2018/07/11/Voodoo-Butterfly-Voodoo-Butterfly-1-by-Camille-Faye
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-10 02:09
The Boy From Tomorrow by Camille DeAngelis
Boy From Tomorrow - Camille DeAngelis

This is the kind of novel I would have loved as a kid, and happily it's one that I love as an adult. Josie and Alec share a house, even a bedroom, but have never met. It's because they live a century apart. Through the use of a spirit board - is Ouija trademarked? - the two become friends. Their communication is severed, but not before Alec gets a hint of danger ahead for Josie and her little sister. Is there anything that Alec can do to help them from a hundred years in the future?

Historical fiction is tricky business, and the hurdles may not be more difficult when writing for a younger audience, but they certainly get a little silly. DeAngelis skillfully leaps those boundaries without sacrificing any of the wonderful details of the past that she inserts into this story.

This is a great new-house story, historical mystery, and a touching depiction of an impossible friendship. OK, you won't cry as much as you did at 'The Fox and the Hound', but you have two children 100 years apart - there's sadness ahead, we both know it. A good story.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-02 17:25
Woman Last Seen in Her Thirties - Camille Noe Pagán

I could definitely relate to this book. Married for so long and just as soon as the kids are about to move out, your "significant other for life" decides everything has been a waste. No growing old together, no until death do us part, and yes, lots of heartbreak.

Divorce can be really hard, especially after that many years, and I really sympathized with Maggie. However, I so admire her. Many women probably would have gone back to their ex with a weak spine and a severe case of loneliness. However, not Maggie. She took the bull by the horn and turned her life around.

Definitely a feel good book for the women who can totally relate to Maggie and the term "woman last seen in her thirties" because after that, all she became was wife and mother. The rest of her was lost taking care of her family.

An absolutely great book that I thoroughly enjoyed.

Huge thanks to Lake Union Publishing and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-03 13:02
New Charity Blues
New Charity Blues - Camille Griep

New Charity Blues is marketed as a retelling of the Trojan War, but as such, the comparisons are rather subtle and I wouldn't recommend it being read like that. After a devastating plague survivors have scrambled together to form two communities, one poor, one relatively rich. When one girl is allowed into the New Charity from the City, she is surprised to see the riches there and she might hold the future of the entire world in her hands.

This was an interesting read. The focus was not so much on the post-apocalyptic setting of the story but more about relevant questions of good and evil, what we would like and what we should do. As such, very interesting. The dual POV was not my favourite but I enjoyed reading the novel nevertheless.

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-01-19 00:00
The Way of Beauty
The Way of Beauty - Camille Di Maio I have read and enjoyed all of Camille Di Maio's books and this one did not disappoint. I was fascinated with the historical background of Penn Station in NYC. This was something I was not that aware of. I felt I was there with the characters as their lives evolved over the years and their love for the station.
I found the characters well developed. I stayed up very late each night as I could not put this book down. I would highly recommend this book to friends and fans of historical fiction.
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?