logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Children
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-19 22:22
Review: The Misadventures of Michael McMichaels Vol. 1: The Angry Alligator
The Misadventures of Michael McMichaels Vol. 1: The Angry Alligator - Tony Penn,Brian Martin

Are you a kid that thinks everything can go wrong does. The Misadventures of Michael McMichaels maybe a good book for you. It a story with morals and life lessons. The first book is about The Angry Alligator. Ever hear the saying The Gator gonna get you or eat you. 

The child in the book say say this to Michael and it gives him the idea of it really happening. The lessons in the book is about not lying about something you did. You know once you tell one lie it get harder to tell the truth as you go to cover up one lie after another.

Well Michael lies and lies and it get all tangled up. You are in a big mess when you should have just told the truth in the first place and you would not be needing to cover up more lies. I also like the saying The truth will set you free.

Source: nrcbooks.blogspot.com/2018/04/review-misadventures-of-michael.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-18 20:49
Book Review of Little Bear and His Chair by Claressa Swensen & Illustrated by Alena Paklina

 

Book Review of Little Bear and His Chair by Claressa Swensen & Illustrated by Alena Paklina

 

Review 5*

 

This is a wonderfully illustrated story for children aged between 3 and 8. I loved it!

 

I love the colourful illustrations done by Alena Paklina. They bring this short story to life and will engage a child who hasn’t fully grasped how to read yet, but who can follow the story with ease as it's been read to them by their parent. It compliments the short story written by the author so one is transported directly into the tale. Depending on the child’s age and reading ability, the author has written a charming story that is easy enough for a young reader to follow, as she uses simple words that will not confuse a child.

 

The story is a simple but important one about learning to share. Little Bear has a lovely chair but refuses to share it. Because of his selfish behaviour, he has been left out of the fun and become lonely, which is no fun at all. He learns that by sharing, he is included in all the fun and games with his friends. This then translates into teaching the young reader how it is better to share when playing with their friends or siblings. Some adults reading this book may decide that this book is also about bullying as Little Bear is not exactly nice to his friends. However, this is not the impression I found when reading it. I suppose it depends on your upbringing and what your life experiences have made to you as a reader, and how you interpret a book in a certain way. I can only go on my impression of this book and I think it’s a lovely book that can entertain as well as educate. Everyone’s opinion is different, so I will leave you to decide if, after reading the sample, whether you would want your child to either listen to you read it, or they read this book on their own.

 

This book is suitable to read as a bedtime story, or anytime at all, especially if a child has a short attention span. It is a quick read, so even if they haven’t settled down, the lovely pictures will entertain the children.

 

Claressa Swensen is a new author to me, as I have not read her other children’s books. However, I would definitely read more of her books in the future.

 

I highly recommend this book to children aged 3 upwards and to adults looking for a fun but educational read for their children. – Lynn Worton (Book Reviews by Lynn)

 

P.S. This book has not yet been published and will be on Kickstarter for a crowdfunding campaign at the beginning of May. Please consider donating to it. The link to the campaign will follow once it goes live on 1st May 2018.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-18 06:04
Review: The Duke Who Ravished Me (Rebellious Brides #4) by Diana Quincy
The Duke Who Ravished Me - Diana Quincy

This was an wonderful, well-written, heart-melting story from start to finish. With one of the best introductory scenes I might have ever read, this is one book I definitely recommend to anyone that loves fresh stories, unique twists, the right amount of drama, and characters full of emotions and wit. 

So, that scene; we are introduced to the Duke of Sunderford, or Sinful Sunny, in the most decadent and naughty way, giving us glimpse of what was yet to come * yum *
I love dukes. I don’t care how many fictitious dukes there are, I’ve read lots of them and I’ll probably continue reading them for the rest of my life. However, Sunny is by far the most deliciously wicked, cynical, charming duke I have ever read. He was the epitome of the perfect all-rounded scoundrel there could possibly exist, and yet in spite of all the flaws the haughty man might have had, he never lied! 

The plot itself was so much fun to read. One of the reasons my favorite trope is enemies to lovers is because of the verbal sparring, and this story satisfied my needs for it Every.Single.Time. The chemistry between Sunny and Isabel, the governess, simmered slowly until it burned a raging blaze at a perfect pace. Their love was believable and honest, just as the emotional attachment Sunny developed for his wards. Throughout the book we learn of Sunny and Isabel’s painful past, yet the story doesn’t dwell on it and instead it moves forward because of it. In truth, I think my only cavil is that as we neared the end I felt the scenes were being rushed. I’m not talking about the ending itself but the scenes that preluded the climax. Even so, the story delivered in every other way so I'm willing to overlook whatever faults I thought there were. 

** I received this book at no cost to me and I volunteered to read it; this is my honest opinion and given without any influence by the author or publisher.**

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-14 19:34
Loony Coon (Living Forest #8)
Looney Coon - Sam Campbell

One cannot doubt that raccoons can be both a source of problems and of humor, but sometimes a raccoon comes along that takes it to extremes.  Loony Coon is the eighth book of Sam Campbell’s Living Forest series which features the antics of the titular raccoon in question as observed by Sam, his wife, Giny, and their friends around the Sanctuary of Wegimind while also visiting an old timer who has is own private sanctuary with a domineering goose.

 

Sam and Giny visit “Coony Castle” after not seeing a raccoon regular at their cabin, Andrea, and discover that she’s giving birth to six babies though one immediately stands out with a floppy left ear and adventurous behavior—Loony.  Although they express interest in all of Andrea’s family, it’s really Loony that becomes the focus of their attention as well as their newest human friends.  Sonya Eck, a young fan of Sam’s, and her parents visit the Campbell’s home not only give their daughter a nature experience but to help her mother Dorothy to not fear animals which results in her own misadventures amongst the wildlife.  The Campbells with new friends in tow visit another nature lover several times; Warden Olie, whose animal friends is second only to that of the Campbells though the goose Grandmaw might be the most domineering animal ever encountered in the series, features in a few humorous situations peppered throughout the book.  The end of the book finds Loony, his mother Andrea, and a sibling sharing “Coony Castle” for the winter and Dorothy on nearly friendly terms with her daughter’s pets after a most interesting summer and fall.

 

Like the majority of the books in this series the length of this book is around 230 pages and is a blend of styles, from the familiar prose of Sam and using other’s stories to fill in content of the book.  Unlike the previous book, Campbell’s words are used throughout however he invests more space for the stories of others though in his words.  The dominating feature of the book is how baby raccoons develop, with Loony as the featured star, however the mission of Dorothy Eck to not fear animals is the strong secondary feature of the book that gives hopes to anyone who is intimidated by animals to learn that others have dealt with them.  And the interludes with Warden Olie feature extreme fun while also helping give the book its’ usual element of forest philosophy.

 

Loony Coon is a wonderful mixture of nature related humor and adventure which is a special feature of Sam Campbell’s Living Forest series.  If you’ve enjoyed the previous books of Campbell’s you’ll enjoy this one, but if you’re knew of Campbell’s writing this might be a nice book to start with.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-05 19:11
The Amber Spyglass / Philip Pullman
The Amber Spyglass - Philip Pullman

Will is the bearer of the knife. Now, accompanied by angels, his task is to deliver that powerful, dangerous weapon to Lord Asriel - by the command of his dying father.

But how can he go looking for Lord Asriel when Lyra is gone? Only with her help can he fathom the myriad plots and and intrigues that beset him.

The two great powers of the many worlds are lining up for war, and Will must find Lyra, for together they are on their way to battle, an inevitable journey that will even take them to the world of the dead...

 

I’m rating this at 4 stars, but really I feel like it should be 4.25 or 4.3 or something like that.  Although I didn’t love it as much as the first two books, I found it to be a realistic and satisfying ending to the trilogy.

 

It was great to see Iorek Byrnison, the armoured, talking polar bear, again.  He gets to be the voice of the natural world, warning against doing something “just because you can” and about unknown consequences of actions.  Pullman had managed to include so many interesting creatures to inhabit all of his parallel universes!  Witches, dæmons, angels, spectres, gyptians, ghosts, just to mention a few.

 

Lyra & Will are on the cusp of adulthood in this book, but have already taken on adult-level responsibilities.  They handle them much better than I would have at the same age!  But didn’t we all feel “all grown up” at that stage?  I couldn’t understand why adults didn’t see me the same way!  Their reluctance to trust me with any kind of burden seemed very insulting to me at 17 or 18 years.

 

I can also see why very religious people wouldn’t care for Pullman’s worldview, but since I’m not a religious person, I was perfectly comfortable with it.  A recommended series.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?