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review 2018-01-29 00:00
Diamond in the Shade 1
Diamond in the Shade 1 - D.J. Manly Diamond in the Shade is an interesting take on a vampire hunter falling for a vampire. In this case the vampire hunter - or Destroyer - in question is an orphan known only as Diamond. Abandoned as a baby, Diamond was left to die on the steps of a Hungarian orphanage in the middle of winter. But he survived the night and was taken in by a monastic society of vampire killers known as Destroyers. Trained from infancy to be a weapon, Diamond knows nothing but killing, feels nothing but duty.

Enter Sebastian Shade. A vampire who'd found his humanity in the arms of another Destroyer over a century before. Tanus the Destroyer had loved Sebastian and had given him a purpose and a reason, to protect humanity from others of his own kind. Even after his death Shade continued to protect humanity, eventually making his way to the new world and settling in New York. But the new world has new rules - and a vampire counsel - that help to keep the status quo between vampires and mortals. Unless the vampires go rogue. And that's where Sebastian stepped in and took care of the problem.

Sebastian now has a team of humans helping him stop the rogues, but this new rogue is beyond even them, forcing Sebastian and the hunter sent to destroy him to work together. A witch turned vampire is stealing babies for an ancient blood ritual. And everyone knows blood rituals are bad news.

As Diamond and Shade work together the unfeeling Destroyer begins to develop feelings for the monster he wants to kill, and said monster is once more falling in love with a mortal. The last time nearly killed him, losing Tanus all but destroyed Shade. How will he survive Diamond?

Read the book and find out.

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text 2017-02-01 07:35
The Pro - D.J. Manly

Lee Hastings is a high priced hooker who, boy oh boy I’m going into this biz, gets, like, $2,000 a night for sex. That’s some serious moolah. I liked Lee he’s got a good heart and treats people well but some of his regulars are a bit assholy. Not cool how you want the hotness but you diss it too. Don’t be bitchy.


Zach is s cop who drinks a lot because he keeps remembering a case gone bad. Zach is totes obsessed over a bad guy, Labeau, who was responsible for a little girl’s death. The cop wants him locked up as of yesterday but he can’t make that happen which means more drinking and feeling shitty. But a chance happens along by the name of Lee Hastings who’s Labeau’s pretty hooker boytoy.


Me to Zach: You are a basic bitch asking Lee to go undercover or you’ll out his clients and stitch him up in business. Bad juju, man. Baaad. It’s not his job to help you out. But I bet you’re thinking how good he’d be in bed, Your gay he’s gay, and aha! knew it, you are thinking about those lips and butt.~ “In your game, you can’t be giving it away for free. So, how much do you charge, anyway, to suck a man’s cock?”  Ooo, and~He walked around to the back, and let out a sharp breath. What an ass, firm, round, absolutely delightful. It had been awhile since he’d seen an ass this nice.
“What are you doing back there, exactly?” Lee snapped.

Cause $2,000 a night hookers have nice asses. Dreaming~~



Me to Lee: Don’t let Zach psych you out just cause he’s a cop and all alpha with a face & bod for sin, a square jaw and is sadly hot. Sadly hot is one of the hottest kinds, Lee, so listen up. I want you to help. Okay, do it, Lee, Do it!! Work with him and get his hot body and alphaness into you bed.  Gawd, I’m such an easy hypocrite.




But Lee has his own little perks from hanging with and helping the hot cop~ Fantasising about Zachary Freeman was his little secret, and in its own way, a source of power.

I had fun fun fun reading this saucy cock teasy book~ it takes awhile for Lee and Zach to get it on but it’s worth the sizzle in the pants getting there~ It wasn’t the client he was fucking, it was that damned cop, but Thomas Carter got the ride of his life. Yasss! Lee’s Little Lee may be fucking someone else for his job but Zach’s in his thoughts. Zach falls for the hottie hooker, goes all macho for him, and all is well in my sexy little bookdom bubble. Oh yeah, and they deal with that douchey bad guy while they get it on. 


The Pro seems to be an oldie but a goody in mm reading. It doesn’t seem like 110 pages, and I mean that in a it seems like more packed into less good way NOT in an, oh shit, I’m going to age and die reading it way. Maybe you should just grab it yourself.


Me to me: Go find some more of this DJ Manly person’s books.

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text 2017-01-25 12:16
7 Great Short Fiction Collections
Strange Wine - Harlan Ellison
The Shawshank Redemption - Stephen King
Tales from Nightside - Charles L. Grant
Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders - Neil Gaiman
Night Music: Nocturnes Volume Two - John Connolly
Owls Hoot in the Daytime & Other Omens: Selected Stories of Manly Wade Wellman (Volume 5) - Manly Wade Wellman
20th Century Ghosts - Joe Hill,Christopher Golden

I am a big short fiction reader, and have always been. I love being able to hop in, geta full experience, and move on in a single sitting. Or take a long, hot bath and read an entire novella. That kind of thing.

These are all single author collections, as opposed to multi-author anthologies. I prefer collections, in general, because, while they may vary wildly in terms of content and quality, they tend to be more cohesive, less jarring. Not to say there aren't some amazing anthos (this is what foreshadowing looks like)...

You'll also notice that these are mostly horror. I feel horror is often best at shorter lengths, giving short, sharp shocks before disbelief can set in. Novellas please me because you have just enough space to flesh out a few characters and give your story depth, but not enough to wander too far off  course.

Anyway, a few faves...


1. Strange Wine - Harlan Ellison  Strange Wine - Harlan Ellison  


    My first Ellison, recommended by Stephen King in Danse Macabre. Contains some of his best, weirdest works, but any Ellison is worth picking up. Still, this has a story about a nice Jewish boy whose dead mom is still trying to run his life. For his own good, of course. How can you resist?


2. Different Seasons - Stephen King  Different Seasons - Stephen King  


    Four novellas, all amazing. Yes, my favorite is "Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption," but"The Breathing Method" is a close second. I love club stories, and this is one of King's rare forays into that sub-genre. 

This is, to my  mind, King's most consistent collection. All of the others have at least one dud. Not this one. There's a reason three of these four tales have been made into great movies.


3. Tales from Nightside - Charles L. Grant  Tales from Nightside - Charles L. Grant  


    Another one highly recommended by King (he wrote the intro), and another that introduced me to one of my favorite authors. One  of the masters of "quiet horror," Grant wasn't much one for gore, preferring to imply some truly terrifying things. Dark and disturbing, with a few weird turns here and there.


4. Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders - Neil Gaiman  Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders - Neil Gaiman  


    I love almost everything I've read of Gaiman's, but this is my favorite of his collections. Not much more to say about it, really, it's just great.


5. Night Music: Nocturnes Volume Two - John Connolly  Night Music: Nocturnes Volume Two - John Connolly  


    Read this last year, and loved it. Everything from literary fantasy to Ligotti-esque horror to true-life hauntings, all in one beautifully written package. Still need to read more Connolly.


6. Owls Hoot in the Daytime & Other Omens: Selected Stories of Manly Wade Wellman (Volume 5) - Manly Wade Wellman  Owls Hoot in the Daytime & Other Omens: Selected Stories of Manly Wade Wellman (Volume 5) - Manly Wade Wellman  


    All of the Silver John stories in one place. One of my favorite series characters, John is an itinerant balladeer who confronts various bizarre happenings during his wanderings through Appalachia. There's nothing quite like this out there.


7. 20th Century Ghosts - Joe Hill,Christopher Golden  20th Century Ghosts - Joe Hill,Christopher Golden  


    If this only had the title story and "Pop Art," it would still make the list, but there's so much more, too. Those two are sweet and sad, but the rest gets pretty damn dark while still keeping a bit of wonder.

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review 2016-12-03 14:17
Mirrors - A.J. Llewellyn,D.J. Manly

If you ever watched the TV serise Ringer  starring Sarah Michelle Geller , then this book is M/M version of that show just with a bit different plot and twists.


Since I enjoyed the show and wished they didn't cancel it after the first season I liked reading this book and it was fun to read.

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review 2016-09-10 14:54
Hey Babe, take a walk on the wild side, Said hey honey, take a walk on the wild side...
Crazy Joe - A.J. Llewellyn,D.J. Manly

Having sex with the bosses son in the copy room at the office Christmas party might not be the best way to further one's career. Who knew? Apparently Dectective Montana Delray of the New Orleans Police Department didn't or at least he didn't know that the hot young man who practically dragged him into the copy room was his captain's son nor did he know that his captain was going to walk in and catch them with their pants down...literally...oopsie, so much for that promising police career.


It was this momentary indiscretion that causes Montana to find himself suddenly an officer of the 77th Precinct. That this precinct is a bit on the bizarre side is a mild understatement. Turns out the best thing that the 77th has going for it is Crazy Joe. He's either crazy or there's some truth to the rumor that he's psychic, but the one thing Montana knows for sure is he's hot, he's gay, he's definitely interested and damned if he isn't actually a good cop as well.


'Crazy Joe' is told from the alternating point of view of both Montana and Joe. In general I found Montana's perspective to be a bit more entertaining. His dry, caustic and somewhat cynical humor left me chuckling on more than one occasion and while I didn't find Joe quite and entertaining I still found him likable.


From start to finish circumstances in this story were bizarre and definitely over the top and while the flow from one POV to the other could have been a bit smoother. I was definitely entertained by the bizarre events that happened at the 77th precinct and enjoyed my brief visit there.



A copy of 'Crazy Joe' was graciously provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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