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review 2018-07-16 21:02
F*** You Very Much
F*** You Very Much: The surprising truth about why people are so rude - Danny Wallace

[I received a copy of this book from NetGalley.]

That was an interesting read. Perhaps not as funny as I had expected, but interesting nonetheless. Basing his argument on what he calls the ‘Hotdog Incident’, where he had to wait for 1 hour to get served a hotdog, and was rudely treated when he dared complain, Danny Wallace goes to explore rudeness and rude behaviours in general. Why are people rude? What’s in it for them? Why are the usual reactions to rudeness, and what do they reveal about people in general?

According to Wallace, it seems that there is something in it for rude people. Rudeness and bullying often tend to create a cognitive dissonance in people who’re at the other end of it, making them slower to react to it; so it looks like this explains why we keep wondering why rude people ‘get away with it’, when it’d stand to logics that they should be pointed at and shamed for their behaviour. I bet most of us had at least one experience of that kind (not necessarily about an actual hotdog) where hours later, we were still thinking about what we should’ve said or done instead. Why didn’t we do it for starters? Because of the shock of being treated rudely. I don’t know if the science behind this is really exact, however, I’m willing to agree with that out of empirical evidence, so to speak.

There were moments when I thought, ‘Did he really dwell on that Hotdog Incident for so long, isn’t that a little far-fetched?’, and it felt more like an artificial gimmick than an actual example to write a book about. But then, I guess it also ties with the point the author was making: what seems like little incidents can indeed stay with us for a lot longer than the few minutes or even seconds they took to happen.

And I do agree that rudeness is contagious. It’s happened to me quite a few times. If someone bumps into me in the street and doesn’t apologise, I’m much more likely to stop caring about the people around me: ‘If -they- don’t make way for me, why should -I- make way for them?’ So, it’s a vicious circle. Being aware of it helps, of course, because then it’s easier to act upon it. Still, it’s frightening how being rude can come… naturally.

A few parts are also devoted to exploring cultural differences, such as what is considered rude in one country but not in the other. Some of those I already knew about (the ‘Paris Syndrome’), others I discovered through this book. This, too, was interesting, because it puts things back into perspective. That’s not to say that we can afford to be rude because we can ‘make it pass as if it’s normal somewhere else’, of course.

The book definitely makes you take a look at yourself: we’ve all been rude at some point or other, and will be rude again. Yet acknowledging it is the first step to stop. (And if it helps facing rudeness from others in a calmer way, because we know the mechanisms behind it, I guess it’s also good experience to put annoying people back in their place.)

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text 2018-02-27 19:21
Why Mucca's always worrying about library books
On the Shores of Darkness, There Is Light: A Novel - Cordelia Strube
Endurance: My Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery - Scott Kelly
Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace - Masha Gessen
The Clothesline Swing - Ahmad Danny Ramadan
Out Standing in the Field: A Memoir by Canada's First Female Infantry Officer - Sandra Perron
The Prey of Gods - Nicky Drayden
Lavinia - Ursula K. Le Guin
White Houses - Amy Bloom
The Boat People - Sharon Bala

Currently checked out:

On the Shores of Darkness, There Is Light: A Novel - Cordelia Strube  (DUE 12 March)

 

*Endurance: My Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery - Scott Kelly  (DUE 12 March)

 

Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace - Masha Gessen  (DUE 12 March)

 

*The Clothesline Swing - Ahmad Danny Ramadan  (DUE 23 March)

 

*Out Standing in the Field: A Memoir by Canada's First Female Infantry Officer - Sandra Perron  (DUE 23 March)

 

*The Prey of Gods - Nicky Drayden  (DUE 3 April)

 

On active hold:

Lavinia - Ursula K. Le Guin (1 of 2 in holds)

*White Houses - Amy Bloom  (6 of 8 in holds)

*The Boat People - Sharon Bala  (18 of 178 in holds)

 

*Newish books that likely can't be renewed.

 

I froze and deleted a bunch of holds, and am not ordering anything else until I get this situation down to something less panic inducing. I'm not completely sure how this happened. I think a lot of things ticked out of hold at once, causing a pile up.

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review 2017-08-05 06:29
A Fun Ethnography of British People at the Turn of the First Century
The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium, An Englishman's World - Robert Lacey,Danny Danziger

As I said above, this book was quite fun to read. It was an interesting angle to use archaeological evidence and historic documentation to extrapolate an ethnography of the early English people. The division of the chapters to reflect aspect of culture based on what the common man of the day would have relied on, the Julian work calendar, was quite excellent, and aided in driving the point home. Due to the main focus of archaeology on elites, this work's focus on the common man was that much more impressive. The dearth of information that is sadly given to the common person invariably made the research that much more arduous, yet the sheer wealth of information covered betrays this dearth, and makes the information displayed that much more impressive.

 

My only complaint is that, in a couple of chapters, it dragged a little bit, disrupting the overall flow of the book. Had that not occurred, it would easily have been a five star work.

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review 2017-07-29 22:15
I'm so behind on my comics!
Batman (2016-) #27 - Tom King,Mikel Janin,Davide Gianfelice,Danny Miki,Clay Mann

But I managed to sneak one in yesterday.   Easier to do that at the concert than Uprooted, so Batman 27 got read.   

 

This one was about Kite-Man.   Yeah, he's a villain who specializes in kites.   And I mean, like huge kites that can carry humans, but still.   Kites.   Kites.   

 

King chooses to do a story about the man behind the kite.   Well, underneath the kite, I guess.   It's about his child.   It's about how before he had his kites - kites, I repeat - he specialized in aerodynamics, building things for villains like The Joker.   It's about how The Joker used kites - yeah, kites - against him and about how he turned that on its head.  

 

By becoming Kite-Man.   That's right.   Kite-Man.   And as ridiculous as a touching story about the man behind Kite-Man sounds, that's what Tom King delivered.  

 

And yet, I'm finding myself slightly disillusioned with this series.   This might be one of the best stories King has delivered in this series, and yet I keep being reminded that Vision exists.  Sales, comments, seeing Vision somewhere and this isn't Vision.   And that's not the best thing.   It didn't have to be exactly Vision or say the things that Vision did; in fact, I don't think it should have done those things.   Batman isn't Vision and his series should be used to a different point.  

 

But Vision was meticulously layered, with depths of meaning - depths that I don't see in this series.   And I sorely miss that.  I wanted this to be as whip smart as that series was, and I don't feel it.   

 

So I'm foreseeing four stars, tops, unless this steps up to Vision level intelligence.   I still love this series sand will continue to buy and read it, but I will still hope that this series gets to that level where I want to reread it multiple times, to glean something new from this series. 

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text 2017-07-05 18:20
REVIEW BY AMY - Empty Threat (The Black Pages, #1) by Danny Bell
Empty Threat - Danny Bell

Elana Black has the power to make herself fictional. But when she decides to start saving all the people in books and TV shows who die just for the sake of advancing the plot, she quickly learns that she's not the only one with her powers.

All Elana wants to do is save people. But these others don't want the stories to change, and they'll do everything they can to stop her. 

If you had the power to change fate... to create a happy ending where there wasn't one before... would you do it if it meant risking your own?

 

@Mommy_Amers, @XpressoReads, #Coming_of_Age, #Fantasy, 4 out of 5 (very good)

 

Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/amy/emptythreattheblackpages1bydannybell
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