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text 2015-01-22 15:33
Indies of Note
Streets of Payne - Jeff Brackett
Dissolute Kinship: A 9/11 Road Trip - David Antrobus
Giggles (a novella) - Michael Crane

The three books above are all by friends of mine. They do not know I'm posting this. I do not have a vested interest in their work. They are all damn fine authors, and they deserve far more attention than they get. If you're one of the authors I mention in this post, you do not need to thank me. I'm doing this because I want to. Thank you for being you.

 

For the science fiction fan: Streets of Payne, by Jeff Brackett

 

For the literary non-fiction fan: Dissolute Kinship, by David Antrobus

 

For the horror fan: Giggles, by Michael Crane (known here on Booklikes as Michael's Book Babble)

 

 

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text 2014-09-01 19:08
Seasons for Charity
Seasons - Edward Lorn,Jo-Anne Teal,J.D. Mader,David Antrobus

Seasons is a little collaboration I did with three fantastic authors. This is literary venture, and not horror in the slightest. Best part is, all proceeds go to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. It's short, it's cheap ($0.99), and it's for a good cause. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Seasons-David-Antrobus-ebook/dp/B00CLG16YA/ref=la_B0073M9ILU_1_19?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1409594517&sr=1-19

 

 

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text 2014-01-09 18:29
READ ME!
Seasons - Edward Lorn,Jo-Anne Teal,J.D. Mader,David Antrobus

Do you like literary fiction? Do you like charity? Do you have a buck (preferably on a credit or debit card, because Amazon doesn't take singles)?

 

If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, SEASONS is the book for you.

 

On a serious note, this collection of interweaving shorts tackles a subject near and dear to my heart. All proceeds go directly to the NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION HOTLINE

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review 2013-10-24 16:08
Dissolute Kinship: A 9/11 Road Trip Review
Dissolute Kinship: A 9/11 Road Trip - David Antrobus

For the most part, I read to be entertained. I normally don’t enjoy nonfiction memoirs. My escapes into literature are normally just that; escapes, so when I picked up David Antrobus’s short story, “Dissolute Kinship: A 9/11 Road Trip,” I did so understanding two things: harsh memories would be dredged up and someone else’s emotions would become my own. What I did not expect to find was a sudden admiration for an author that, in my honest opinion, makes my own writing look banal in comparison.

I do these reviews not to help sell other author’s works, but to dissect what they have done right or wrong. I am a self-trained storyteller; literature is my classroom. With David Antrobus, I have learned that there is beauty in the mundane. My favorite bit from the story has David likening a cloud of smoke to a head of a cauliflower. Simple, beautiful, striking. You see exactly what he means without him having to go into great detail. That might seem like a small thing to everyone else, but to me, it’s my life’s blood.

I enjoyed the story as much as I could, seeing as it’s not a light-hearted journey. What I saw was a man coming blindly into a terrible situation. There was no one to fight, no place-holder to attack, nothing but an overwhelming since of sadness and empathy for those around him. At that moment, David seemed to look within and without with equal curiosity. So often I read stories from only one point of view—the author describing in glorious detail what’s happening inside, inside, inside, forgetting for a moment that the real world is still going on around them. David doesn’t do this. He examines his own feelings as well as the emotions emanating from those he comes in contact with. I applaud his efforts, for he succeeds page after page.

David Antrobus has a way with syntax. You can tell he is a well-read, intelligent individual that could crush you with his vocabulary given the chance, yet he dribbles instead of spews. He brings out the big guns only when their effect is desirable and doesn’t beat you about the head with verbose meanderings. Having an extensive lexicon and knowing when to use it is a gift in my eyes. David, you, sir, are gifted.

This is the first piece from David I have read—other than his online presence—and it will not be my last. Thank you for sharing your travels. They were well received.

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review 2012-09-10 00:00
Dissolute Kinship: A 9/11 Road Trip - Da... Dissolute Kinship: A 9/11 Road Trip - David Antrobus For the most part, I read to be entertained. I normally don’t enjoy nonfiction memoirs. My escapes into literature are normally just that; escapes, so when I picked up David Atrobus’s short story, “Dissolute Kinship: A 9/11 Road Trip,” I did so understanding two things: harsh memories would be dredged up and someone else’s emotions would become my own. What I did not expect to find was a sudden admiration for an author that, in my honest opinion, makes my own writing look banal in comparison.

I do these reviews not to help sell other author’s works, but to dissect what they have done right or wrong. I am a self-trained storyteller; literature is my classroom. With David Atrobus, I have learned that there is beauty in the mundane. My favorite bit from the story has David likening a cloud of smoke to a head of a cauliflower. Simple, beautiful, striking. You see exactly what he means without him having to go into great detail. That might seem like a small thing to everyone else, but to me, it’s my life’s blood.

I enjoyed the story as much as I could, seeing as it’s not a light-hearted journey. What I saw was a man coming blindly into a terrible situation. There was no one to fight, no place-holder to attack, nothing but an overwhelming since of sadness and empathy for those around him. At that moment, David seemed to look within and without with equal curiosity. So often I read stories from only one point of view—the author describing in glorious detail what’s happening inside, inside, inside, forgetting for a moment that the real world is still going on around them. David doesn’t do this. He examines his own feelings as well as the emotions emanating from those he comes in contact with. I applaud his efforts, for he succeeds page after page.

David Atrobus has a way with syntax. You can tell he is a well-read, intelligent individual that could crush you with his vocabulary given the chance, yet he dribbles instead of spews. He brings out the big guns only when their effect is desirable and doesn’t beat you about the head with verbose meanderings. Having an extensive lexicon and knowing when to use it is a gift in my eyes. David, you, sir, are gifted.

This is the first piece from David I have read—other than his online presence—and it will not be my last. Thank you for sharing your travels. They were well received.


E.
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