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text 2018-12-09 01:40
DEADLINE by MIRA GRANT
Deadline - Mira Grant

Audiobook

Not to toot my own horn, but TOOT! I figured out the ending as soon as Kelly said what she did to escape. Also, the SPOILER!! [ George] haunting is just strange. 

And last but not least my prognostication radar has went off and I'll share what I think the next book will show, which I've thought since book one SPOILER!!! [Rick has a bad buy from the beginning and he's part of this new outbreak]. I may be wrong though.

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review 2018-06-27 23:25
Deadline
Deadline - Professor John H Dunning

This story got my attention very early on and kept it the whole way through. It was a good story. I really like the way it sounded like an old detective novel only it is about a journalist. Walker is just starting work at the Tribune in New York but before he gets there he happens to see a fire and hears people screaming at a small carnival. A circus tent was on fire, the fabric going up like paper. He went to help and a fireman asked for his help carrying a small body out on a stretcher. It was the body of a young girl and seeing her young form affected him deeply. Later, as the number of deaths increased, he kept tabs on the story and was surprised to learn that no one ever came to claim the young girl's body. He had been given another story to work on but he wasn't interested. He began trying to figure out the identity of that little girl who was eventually buried in a pauper's grave by the coroner. He knew there must be a big story there and there was. It was so big in fact, that finding out might cost his life.

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review 2018-02-20 15:59
Deadline by Jennifer Blackstream
Deadline (Blood Trails) (Volume 1) - Jennifer Blackstream

Deadline by Jennifer Blackstream is book 1 in the Blood Trials Series. I personally thought it was a great start for a series and cannot wait for book 2. This series has a lot of great potential to be one of my new favorite series. I really liked the main character Shade Renard. I love how she does not always have all the answers, and that all though she is a strong person she is not a strong witch. I love how she learns as she goes. All of the characters in the book were written very well, even the villains. This books was one of those I had a very hard time putting down.

 

In the book Shade is a village witch, kind of like a healer so to speak as well as taking care of problems in her village. Along with her Familiar a Pixie named Peasblossom they take on the village problems. But Shade also has a dream of being a PI.

 

An FBI Contact asks her to consult on a case of a possible haunting which includes a missing woman. Shade jumps at the chance. Then Crime Lord Anton Winters, AKA the Prince Kirill of Dacia, and also a Vampire shows up at Shades door to hire her to help find a his stolen black book, she gets her first real case, and can hopefully prove herself as a PI.

 

Dealing with stronger Otherworld creatures she will have to first survive the case, before she can solve it.

 

I was given my copy of this book by the Author and Enchantress Design and Promo as part of a book tour. My thoughts on this book are my own.

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text 2017-10-23 18:54
5 spooky books you're reading right now
Cuckoo Song - Frances Hardinge
Deadline - Mira Grant
Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: Twenty Chilling Tales from the Wilderness - Hal Johnson,Tom Mead
What the Hell Did I Just Read - David Wong
The Turn of the Screw - Henry James,Richard Armitage,Emma Thompson

9 days to Halloween. If you're wondering what to read to feel the spirit of the upcoming night, check out what BookLikes bloggers are reading right now.

 

A blogger at Darth Pony is reading Cuckoo Song by Frances Hardinge  

Cuckoo Song - Frances Hardinge

When Triss wakes up after an accident, she knows that something is very wrong. She is insatiably hungry; her sister seems scared of her and her parents whisper behind closed doors. She looks through her diary to try to remember, but the pages have been ripped out.

Soon Triss discovers that what happened to her is more strange and terrible than she could ever have imagined, and that she is quite literally not herself. In a quest to find the truth she must travel into the terrifying Underbelly of the city to meet a twisted architect who has dark designs on her family - before it's too late.

 

A blogger at isanythingopen is reading Deadline by Mira Grant 

Deadline - Mira Grant

Shaun Mason is a man without a mission. Not even running the news organization he built with his sister has the same urgency as it used to. Playing with dead things just doesn't seem as fun when you've lost as much as he has.
But when a CDC researcher fakes her own death and appears on his doorstep with a ravenous pack of zombies in tow, Shaun has a newfound interest in life. Because she brings news-he may have put down the monster who attacked them, but the conspiracy is far from dead.
Now, Shaun hits the road to find what truth can be found at the end of a shotgun.

 

A blogger at Reading For The Heck Of It is reading Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: Twenty Chilling Tales from the Wilderness by Hal Johnson

Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: Twenty Chilling Tales from the Wilderness - Hal Johnson,Tom Mead

Meet the snoligoster, who feeds on the shadows of its victims. The whirling whimpus, who once laid low an entire Boy Scout troop. And the hoop snake, who can chase prey at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour and then, with one sting of its venomous tail, cause it to turn purple, swell up, and—alas—die.
These and 17 other fearsome creatures are among the most fantastical beasts in American folklore. Their stories, as narrated by one of the last surviving cryptozoologists, are best enjoyed while sitting around a campfire. If you dare.

 

A blogger at What I am reading is reading What the Hell Did I Just Read - David Wong

What the Hell Did I Just Read - David Wong

From the writer of the cult sensation John Dies at the End comes another terrifying and hilarious tale of almost Armageddon at the hands of two hopeless heroes.

It’s the story “They” don’t want you to read. Though, to be fair, “They” are probably right about this one. No, don’t put the book back on the shelf – it is now your duty to purchase it to prevent others from reading it. Yes, it works with ebooks, too; I don’t have time to explain how.

While investigating a fairly straightforward case of a shape-shifting interdimensional child predator, Dave, John, and Amy realized there might actually be something weird going on. Together, they navigate a diabolically convoluted maze of illusions, lies, and their own incompetence in an attempt to uncover a terrible truth that they - like you - would be better off not knowing. Your first impulse will be to think that a story this gruesome – and, to be frank, stupid – cannot possibly be true. That is precisely the reaction “They” are hoping for.

 

A blogger behind Ani's Book Abyss is reading The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

The Turn of the Screw - Henry James,Richard Armitage,Emma Thompson

Henry James's classic ghost story The Turn of the Screwhas been enthralling readers for over a century and shows no sign of losing popularity as new generations continue to discover this chilling masterpiece.
The novella's anonymous narrator is a young woman, a parson’s daughter, who is engaged as governess to two seemingly innocent children at a remote English country house. What initially seems a idyllic soon turns nightmarish, as she becomes convinced that the children are consorting with a pair of malevolent spirits. These are the ghosts of former employees at Bly: a valet and a previous governess. In life, scandalously, the two of them had been discharged as illicit lovers, and their spectral visitations with the children hint at Satanism and possible sexual abuse. The book amply fulfills its pledge, laid down in the first few pages, that nothing can touch it in terms of sheer “dreadful—dreadfulness.”

 

What are you reading? Share the titles below.

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review 2017-07-05 23:40
A Good Highway Audiobook
Deadline - Sandra Brown

I listened to this as an audiobook, and it delivered what I want from that medium: it kept me wildly alert on long drives (except during one of the sex scenes, which ran on so long I found myself thinking, “No, I don’t want to hear about a third orgasm; get on with the story.”)

 

Just when you think the mystery is solved and there’s nothing left reveal, there’s more. (Kind of like that sex scene, only more exciting.) Brown accomplishes this layered process of revelation through police procedure, an investigative journalist’s persistence, and authorial sleight of hand. The first two are done well, but I’m not a fan of authors overtly withholding from readers. In this case, it makes a certain big discovery feel like a trick rather than part of the growth of an organic plot and I was thrown out of the story for a while. Having the protagonist suddenly share a stunning secret that he has known all along, while effective in making me sit up and say “Whoa!” didn’t work for me otherwise. If he knew this truth, and more than half the book is in his point of view, and he never once thinks about this secret in his private ruminations or during interactions with affected people, especially with a close friend who knows the secret, it’s out of character for such a deep and introspective man. Aside from that and the over-long sex scene, however, this is a great book, masterfully crafted, with intense and believable relationships. Brown waits until the antagonists’ biggest secret has been revealed before showing their points of view. She uses diary excerpts effectively to get yet another point of view and a glimpse of the past. While Deadline isn’t perfect, I still recommend it for fast-paced listening, an excellent audiobook for long stretches of highway. You won’t get close to falling asleep at the wheel.

 

This next comment is more of a footnote than part of the review—food for thought. The book is set in the South and yet everyone is apparently white. Maybe some authors don’t think they should mention race or skin color in a description, but if hair color and eye color are worth noting, why not skin color? In the points of view of a white protagonist, white love interest, and white close friend and ally, it seems that other races and ethnicities would be noticed as a matter of observing appearances, not judging or categorizing. Without any mention of race at all, I got the image of a hundred-percent white cast of characters, and I have never gone a day in the South or the Southwest without interacting with diverse people. (Am I the only reader who ever has this thought? Do other readers have auto-diversity imaginations?)

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