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url 2018-01-26 20:29
Fighting Erasure: Women SF Writers of the 1970s, A Through F
Thieves' World - Robert Lynn Asprin,Lynn Abbey,John Brunner,Poul Anderson,Andrew J. Offutt,Joe Haldeman,Marion Zimmer Bradley,Christine DeWees
A Woman of the Iron People - Eleanor Arnason
Kindred - Octavia E. Butler
Red Moon and Black Mountain - Joy Chant
The Vampire Tapestry - Suzy McKee Charnas
Gate of Ivrel - C.J. Cherryh
Moongather - Jo Clayton
The Door Into Fire - Diane Duane
Born to Exile - Phyllis Eisenstein
Light Raid - Connie Willis,Cynthia Felice

In the 70's, I mostly got to read school library books, my aunt's endless Harlequin subscriptions and yard sale finds.  So, several of these are authors I haven't read:

 

I have all the Diadem novels by Jo Clayton (most are so yellowed and brittle -- some I had to get used in pre-Amazon and pre-eBay online searches so came that way and some were mine).  I've been putting off finishing because hard for my old lady eyes to read.

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url 2018-01-25 21:59
Fighting Erasure: Women SF Writers of the 1970s, A Through F
Thieves' World - Robert Lynn Asprin,Lynn Abbey,John Brunner,Poul Anderson,Andrew J. Offutt,Joe Haldeman,Marion Zimmer Bradley,Christine DeWees
A Woman of the Iron People - Eleanor Arnason
Kindred - Octavia E. Butler
Red Moon and Black Mountain - Joy Chant
The Vampire Tapestry - Suzy McKee Charnas
Gate of Ivrel - C.J. Cherryh
Moongather - Jo Clayton
The Door Into Fire - Diane Duane
Born to Exile - Phyllis Eisenstein
Light Raid - Connie Willis,Cynthia Felice

The link goes to TOR.com article from their recent email newsletter with more details on books/authors.  In the 70's, I mostly got to read school library books, my aunt's endless Harlequin subscriptions and yard sale finds.  So, several of these are authors I haven't read:

 

 

I have all the Diadem novels by Jo Clayton (most are so yellowed and brittle -- some I had to get used in pre-Amazon and pre-eBay online searches so came that way and some were mine).  I've been putting off finishing because hard for my old lady eyes to read.

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review 2018-01-10 07:31
Eleanor Oliphant is more than fine, she is wonderful
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine - Gail Honeyman

Gail Honeyman’s Eleanor Oliphant, the narrator of her debut novel is more than fine, she is wonderful! One of the most genuine and deeply moving character journeys I’ve read in a very long time – powerful enough to evoke tears of laughter and sadness. One of our Top Reads of 2017.

 

Read our full review of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman at bookloverbookreviews.com >>

Source: bookloverbookreviews.com/2017/09/eleanor-oliphant-is-completely-fine-by-gail-honeyman-book-review.html
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review 2015-12-08 01:52
bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2015/12/01/november-2015-round-up
Half a Creature from the Sea: A Life in Stories - David Almond,Eleanor Taylor

Cybils book. Almond is a wonderful writer–great at magical descriptions and dreamy, eerie stories. I do wonder who this short story collection is FOR; the stories themselves are mg/YA, but the framing distances the narrator from that age and for me set up an unnecessary barrier between reader and story.

Source: bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2015/12/01/november-2015-round-up
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review 2015-09-07 18:34
Recent Reading: non-fiction and YA
Hissing Cousins: The Untold Story of Eleanor Roosevelt and Alice Roosevelt Longworth - Marc Peyser,Timothy Dwyer
The Disenchantments - Nina LaCour
The Devil You Know - Trish Doller

Hissing Cousins by Marc Peyser and Timothy Dwyer: I picked up this double biography of Eleanor & Alice Roosevelt because, I mean, look at that tile! How could I not? It turned out to be (as far as I could judge) a well-researched and well-written look at the complex intertwining lives of these two cousins. Peyser & Dwyer examine the ways in which each woman lived up to her reputation, as well as the ways in which she didn’t. They also look at the long-standing feud between them, and the ways in which this both was and wasn’t reflected in their actual relationship. Definitely recommended for people interested in early 20th c. American history, or women’s history, or complicated family dynamics. My only quibble is that the authors seem reluctant to talk about the wider social ramifications of, say, Theodore Roosevelt and his beliefs and policies in favor of a mostly-positive personal portrait.

 

The Disenchantments by Nina LaCour: I picked this one up after reading and loving LaCour’s more recent Everything Leads to You. The Disenchantments has the quirky, artsy, adventure/quest that I enjoyed in ELtY, but for me it lacked some of the depth of character that I saw in that book. Then again, it’s also true that this book falls into the pattern of a boy interacting with an unattainable, brilliant, and unknowable girl. It’s well written, and yet the pattern itself annoys me; if anything, I wanted this story from Bev’s point of view. Still, LaCour’s prose is smoothly enjoyable and the story as a whole does a nice job of looking at that transition from high school to college, as well as the realization that the adults in your life are actually human and complex.

 

The Devil You Know by Trish Doller: The Devil You Know has been very highly praised by several people I trust, and I really liked Doller’s previous books. This one is part coming-of-age, part romance, and part mystery. I had two somewhat different reactions to it. First, like Dessen’s Saint Anything, I thought Doller did a great job of writing an extremely readable book, which also takes on big issues. I really admired the way she wrote this situation where things slowly start to unravel. And the fact that Cadie is never judged or shamed for the choices she makes also was great. On the other hand, I figured out the mystery really quickly. That said, this is 1) a book written for teens and not for mystery-obsessed adults (me) and 2) not the reason I was reading this book and therefore wasn’t as much of a problem as it might have been. So despite that fact, I would definitely recommend this one if you want that combination of big topics and readability

Source: bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2015/09/07/recent-reading-non-fiction-and-ya
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